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Full text of "Annual Reports of the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony, at Gardner, Mass (1925-1934)"

Li 



Public Document No. 70 



^'t)t CommontDealtf) of M^^^^ttnuttt^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 

/ 



TRUSTEES OF THE GARDNER 
STATE COLONY ^wn^ 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1925 



Department of Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
650 5- '26 Order 5 1 72. 



TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



OF THE 



GARDNER STATE COLONY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Ariie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 

Thomas R. P. Gibb, Rockport, Mass. 

George N. Harwood, Barre, Mass. 

Owen A. Hoban, Gardner, Mass. 

Mrs. Alice M. Spring, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg, Mass. 



Gharles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent 
Arthur N. Ball, M.D., Assistant Superintendent 
LoNNiE 0. Farrar, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician 
MiLMAN Pease, M.D., Assistant Physician 



Garleton G. Osgood, D.M.D., Dentist 
Myron L. Marr, Steward 
Maurice S. Powell, Head Farmer 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer 
Garolyn D. Harlow, Social Service Worker 



Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women 
Harry Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, Etc. 
David Profit, Supervisor of Shoemaking 
Henry L. Neilson, Supervisor of Tailoring 
John H. Jenkins, Supervisor of Furniture Making 
Walter Warman, Supervisor of Pottery ■ 
Edward G. Gorey, Supervisor of Printing 

SUPERVISORS 
Elvira L Winchenbach, R.N., Women^s Infirmary 
Alton J..WiNCfiE'N«AcH, MeJiS Infirr/cary 
Hazel M. Hsri^an,- R.;N., fTosvitai' 



RESIDENT OFFIGERS 



-, Assistant Physician 



DIREGTORS OF INDUSTRIES 



GOLONIES 



Matrons 

MRS..T^ATHERiNE.B.OT\TkiAN . ^ .Belcher Gottage 

Mnz: Milrtie Si'HAGur: : . lliUcr^^t Gottage 

Mrs: Mertie "Morse • - ' * Valiey Gottage 

Mrs. Minnie Larkin Gardner Gottages 

Mrs. Mabel Sanderson Fair\aew Gottage 

Mrs. Mary Staples Highland Gottage 

Mrs.JGladys Ben-nett Overlook Gottage 



Supervisors 
Hall C. Bowman 
Streeter G. Sprague 
Fred Morse 
Herbert F. Larkin 



Wachusett Gottage 
Westminster Gottages 



Grosby a. Sanborn 
Eugene L. Bryant 



RELIGIOUS SERVIGES 



Rev. James W. Dolan, Gatholic 



Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 



Local Pastors in turn, Protestant 



TRUSTEES' REPORT 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

We have the honor to present herewith the twenty-third Annual Report of the 
Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

Your Board has regularly met once a month during the year and has conscien- 
tiously and interestedly visited the Colonj^ and followed the work there. It again 
commends the careful and conscientious work of its Superintendent, Dr. Charles E. 
Thompson. 

Attention is invited to liis detailed report which accompanies this document. He 
so carefully describes the number and character of our patients and what has been 
done for their care and benefit, that there is no need for us to repeat. 

The Trustees invite especial attention to the requests for appropriations for special 
objects which have been submitted and which appear in the Superintendent's 
reporc. They desire to emphasize particularly the first three of these needs. 

At every visit made by members of the Board it has been impressed upon them 
most strongly that the present situation whereby the old and infirm and quiet 
patients are housed in the same buildings with the noisy and destructive and ob- 
scene, is one which is not creditable to the Institution nor to the Commonwealth. 
The Trustees have repeatedly asked for the necessary construction to enable them 
to separate these classes of patients. So far tliis appeal has been without avail. It 
is hoped that the present request will meet with better success. 

The Trustees consider that a Superintendent's house is most important for the 
well-being of the State Colony. The Superintendent and his family are entitled to 
living quarters which will take him away from the strain of his daily association with 
patients and business. The high character of our hospitals for the insane can only 
be maintained by having at the head of them men of capacity, humanity, and pro- 
fessional skill. Such men can only be procured in the long run when they are given 
proper conditions under which to live and do their work. All on the fist of requests 
in the Superintendent's report are important. The Trustees have emphasized those 
only which they consider absolutely essential to maintain the standard and good 
work of the Colony. 

The Trustees are gratified that work has at last been begun to provide a suitable 
water supply for the Colony. They are disappointed that it mU not be completed 
until Spring, but they feel that at last the terrible danger which they feared from 
fire and disease, because of lack of water, promises to be soon averted. 

AMIE H. COES, OWEN A. HOBAN 

THOMAS R. P. GIBB THOMAS H. SHEA, 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD, ALICE M. SPRING, 

FREDERIC A. WASHBURN, Chairman. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

Herewith is respectfully presented the twenty- third report of the administration 
of the hospital which is for the hospital year ending September 30, 1925 and the 
financial year ending November 30, 1925. 

Regarding Patients 

The whole number ot patients treated during the year was 664 men, 485 women, 
total 1149. There were under care, actually at the Colony September 30, 1924, 567 
men, 358 womea, a total of 935. On the same date there were in family care 36 
women. This made a total of 567 men, 404 women, total 971 actually under care. 

During the year there have been changes in population as follows: admitted from 
the community 61 men, 38 women, total 99; by transfer from other hospitals 12 



4 



P.D. 70 



men, 17 women, total 29. Residence has been terminated by discharge 37; by trans- 
fer to other hospitals 1 ; died 24 men, 16 women, total 40. 

The number of deaths 40 may be compared with the year 1924 when 38 were 
removed by death. The three chief causes of death in order of frequency were: 
cardiac disease, tuberculosis of the lungs, cerebral hemorrhage. It should be noted 
that 623^% of all deaths occurred in those fifty years of age or over. The average 
age of all at death was fifty-six and one-half years. 

Excessive use of alcohol as the direct cause of hospital care occurred in 12% o^all 
direct admissions. It is impossible to determine the part excessive alcholoic indul- 
gence played in other cases as a contributary cause. 

The number remaining on our books September 30, 1925 is 600 men, 641 women, 
total 1041. 

Family Care 

Since 1915 we have found it desirable to place in homes in this vicinity certain 
selected patients, chiefly women. These homes are carefully selected and super- 
vised by the Social Service and Medical Departments and in them are placed 
patients, usually above middle age, who may appreciate home surroundings and 
who cannot be especially benefited by hospital care, but who, for various reasons, 
cannot be in their former homes. Some also are able to here readjust themselves 
to home life before returning to their own homes or to some gainful occupations. 

This year we have had under such care 10 men, 55 women, total 65. There now 
remain in famihes 7 men, 40 women, total 47. 

The Physical Health 
of our entire population has been excellent so far as acute contagious and infectious 
diseases are concerned. Two cases of Encephalitis Lethargica have been received. 
Fifteen major operations have been performed. 

Cooperation with the Community 
through the Out-Patient Department which has been found distinctly valuable to 
the Communitj'' and to us, has continued. It seems to us that this is one of the most 
important branches of our work. It not only serves for the gi^'ing of advice, but 
offers a splendid opportunity to spread the gospel of mental hygiene and the sowing 
of seeds of better mental health. These contacts, and we are always endeavoring 
to make more, serve also to emphasize the fact that the hospital is a part of the 
community and not a thing apart. Following is a table showing the w^ork done in 



this department: 

Men Women Total 

Examined at Colony 4 2 6 

Examined at CHnics 10 21 31 

Examined in Homes 15 12 27 

Examined in General Hospitals 2 2 4_ 

31 37 68 



Recommendations made were as follows: Commitment as psychotic, 15; Volun- 
tary hospital care, 4; Commitment to School for Feeble Minded, 7; Home care with 
medical treatment, 5; Home care without medical treatment, 8; School supervision, 
10; Almshouse or Reformatory, 2; Medical treatment, 2; Further study, 3; Special 
training in school for deaf mutes, 1; Others, various, 5. 

Treatment 

As in all past years. Occupational and Industrial Therapy have been used more 
than any other form of treatment. All patients are reviewed at daily Staff Meetings 
and especially in all recent cases is this treatment prescribed by the physician and 
followed up by him. Case record forms as prepared by the American Occupational 
Association are used. We divide our activities into three groups: Hospital Indus- 
tries, Hospital Occupations and Industrial Therapy. An average of 85% have been 
daily occupied and in so far as possible along creative and productive lines. 

Next in general importance in treatment is hydrotherapy This form of treat- 
ment is invaluable especially in the acute and the excitable. The following hst of 
treatments show only to what extent it is used. This, or any table, cannot accu- 
rately show the precise benefit derived, but in general the results are shown in more 
quiet individuals, orderly behaved groups, a quiet community. This would be still 
more marked if overcrowding could be lessened. 



P.D. 70. 





Men 


Women 


Total 


Salt Glow 


358 


214 


872 


Saline Bath 


215 


311 


526 


Tub Shampoo 


427 


576 


1003 


Hair Shampoo 


426 


576 


1002 


Special spine treatment 


49 


12 


61 


Special hip and leg treatment 


3 





3 


Wet Mitt Friction 





42 


42 


Needle Spray 


1003 


1050 


2053 


Fan Douche 


995 


992 


1987 


Rain Douche 


416 


541 


957 



Continuous Bath Treatment 

Men 
Women 
Total 
Wet Pack Treatment 



No. of Different 
Patients 
82 
49 
131 

No. of Different 
Patients 
26 
223 
249 



Men 
Women 
Total 

Social Service 
New Cases referred by Community Agencies 
New Cases referred by Hospital Physicians 

Total 



No. of Baths 
568 
463 
1031 



No 



of Packs 

'36 
3556 
3592 

132 
79 

211 



Problems at Hospital: Mental 239; Sex, 33; Financial, 3; Employment, 16; Re- 
adjustment, 169; Marital, 8; PersonaUty and Temperament, 144; Recreation. 181; 
General Problems, 310. 

Investigation: Conduct disorders, 29; Employment situations, 10; Home con- 
ditions, 87; Statement of patients, 73; Statement of others, 56; Visits made, 908. 

School Clinic 

work which means the examination of backward children in the public schools has 
been continued. 184 have been examined and recommendations made as follows: 









Institu- 


Continued 


Reached 






Special 


tional 


in 


Scholastic 


Town 


Total 


. Classes 


Care 


Grade 


Attainment 


Ashburnham 


13 


1 





12 





Barre 


7 


3 





4 





Dana 


2 


1 





1 





Erving 


2 








2 





Fitchburg 


22 


12 





5 


5 


Gardner 


31 


16 





13 


2 


Greenwich 


3 








3 





Hubbardston 


7 


1 





3 


3 


Hardwick 


2 


1 





1 





Leverett 


3 


1 


2 








New Salem 


2 








1 


1 


Orange 


18 


5 


2 


10 


i 


Petersham 


1 





1 








Phillipston 


4 


2 








2 


Prescott 


1 








1 





Shutesbury 


1 


1 . 











Templcton (Bald^\^nville) 


26 


7 


3 


13 


3 


Wendell 


3 








3 





Winchendon 


36 


8 


1 


24 


3 




184 


59 


9 


96 


20 



6 



P.D. 70. 



Dental Department 
In the Dental Department the following work has been done: Examinations 942; 
Cleanings 890; Cement fillings 80; Gutta Percha fillings 28; Amalgum fiUings 332; 
Gold finings 4; Zinc Oxide Pulp caps 37; Synthetic Porcelain filhngs 99; Extractions 
422; Root Canal treatment 77; Root Canal filled 31; Vincento Angina treatments 
23; Pj^orrhea treatments 260; Post operative treatment 26; Gingivitis treatment 31; 
Plates made 14; Plates repaired 12; Bridge reset 1; Resection of alveolae abscess 1; 
Mucoparous Cyst 1. 

DivEESE Medical Matters 

There has been but one change in our Medical Staff during the year. Lassalle 
Laberge, M.D., appointed Assistant Physician June 10, 1925, left September 30, 
1925 to accept a position at the State Hospital for Tuberculosis at Norwich, Conn. 

The following meetings have been held at the Colony: July 28, The Worcester 
North Medical Society; September 5, The Rotary Clubs of Gardner, Fitchburg and 
Leominster; September 30, The New England Society of Psychiatry. 



Recommendations 

Complying with Section 3, Chap. 29, General Laws, the following estimates for 
1926 have been submitted: 

Object for which appropriation Estimates for Last 

is required 1926 approvriation 

Personal Services $183,033 . 60 $170,000 . 00 

ReUgious Instruction 1,891 . 50 2,000 . 00 

Travel, Trans., and 0. E. 6,250. 00 4,300. 00 

Food 77,533.73 53,000.00 

Clothing and Material 12,850. 00 11,500. 00 

Furnishing and Household Supphes 20,400 . 00 20,000 . 00 

Medical and General Care 19,250 . 00 14,000 . 00 

Heat, Light and Power 28,967 . 54 28,385 . 00 

Farm 31,482.80 28,000.00 

Garage, Stable and Grounds 7,206. 71 5,900. 00 

Repairs Ordinary 17,350.00 14,500.00 

Repairs and Renewals 18,076 . 00 8,000 . 00 



$434,191.88 $359,585.00 

Complying with Section 4, Chap. 29, General Laws, requests for appropriations 
for special objects have been submitted as follows: 

1. Building for Treatment of the Semi- disturbed. 

2. Two Additional Buildings for the Disturbed. 

3. Superintendent's House. 

4. Barn and Dairy Building. 

5. Replacement of the Valley and Wachusett Cottage. 

6. Generator for Power House. 

7. Purchase of Land. 

8. Construction of Road to the Town of Westminster. 

9. Additional Colony Group, 

10. Employees' Cottage. 

11. Coal Tre.stle. 

12. Food Conveyors. 

1. Building for Treatment of the Semi-disturbed. The need of this building has 
been expressed at every opportunity for the last tliree years. This need becomes 
greater each year and is now pressing because of the layout of the Colony which 
necessitates the return from the ''Colonies" to the Infirmarj^ Building on the 
quadrangle, all those who are, because of their disturbed condition, unable to remain 
in the "Colonies". This has, very naturally, led to an accumulation of disturbed 
patients and only very intensive hydrotherapeutic measures, continued day and 
night, have kept this central group from being an "Asylum" of twenty years ago. 



P.D. 70. 



7 



It must be remembered that the plan of the Colony as early conceived provided 
colonies for the quiet and a central group for the infirm and with the exception of 
two small buildings for ten each for which an appropriation to connect with the 
Power House by subway to carry on hydrotherapeutic treatment has each year been 
denied, no other buildings for the care of Ihe disturbed have been erected. To say 
that this need is pressing is putting it very mildly and I most respectfully urge that 
this, above every other request, receive your approval. 

2. Two Additional Buildings for the Disturbed. When a group of small build- 
ings was planned, it was understood that we would receive one additional each year. 
Two have been built. In view of the fact that an appropriaJ'ion has not been made 
from time to time to complete this group, the unit is incomplete, has not been con- 
nected with the subway and hydrotherapy is not carried on and we are not able to 
operate as the original plan contemplated. Two (one for each sex) should be pro- 
\'ided. A subway connection at ''Hospital" should be made. 

S. Superintendent's House. The Superintendent is housed on the second floor cf 
the Administration Building. A separate house is desirable 

i. Barn and Dairy Building. Last year our herd of reacting cows were replaced 
and we have been actively engaged in building up the herd in numbers and quality. 
The present barn is now filled. This Fall it will not be possible to accommodate the 
increased numbers at the dairy group. At sl time when so much attention is being 
paid to developing the herd, economical production of pure milk, etc., it decidedly 
is not the best plan to scatter growing heifers in barns all over the Colony. 

A new barn should also proXdde for hay storage. This year we will not have room 
to put all of our home grown hay in nearby barns and another year the crop should 
be still larger. 

We have no suitable storage for farm tools, implements, etc., and at the location 
of this proposed barn you will see carriages, tools, etc., out-of-doors for lack of 
housing room. This is bad in appearance, still worse for its effect on the imple- 
ments and most ot all certainly not economical. 

A dairy or milk room has been planned, detached from the present and proposed 
barn and located on the South and in front, to pro\ide for clean and proper handhng 
of milk and to minimize the fire risk which I consider great. 

5. Replacement of the Valley and Wachusett Cottages. These two houses were 
originally farm buildings which were on the property when it was first purchased, 
with some changes made since. They have now reached an age where there is some 
question whether they should be continued for the housing of patients. 

6. Generator for Power House. At present and for several years past, power has 
been purchased from the Connecticut River Power Co., through its subsidary the 
Gardner Electric Co. During these years the Colony has grown. A study made 
several years ago indicated that it was economy to purchase power. Another study 
at this time would quite likely show that we have reached a size when we could 
generate power cheaper. There is always a likelihood too, because of increasing 
cost of coal that a new contract would not be as favorable as those of the past. 
Unavoidable breakdowns in purchased power transmission would find us equipped 
to generate at our own plant. I recommend that inasmuch as our present contract 
expired July 5, 1925, that a review be made of purchased power versus Colony 
generated power and a larger generator installed for emergencies or continuous 
service. 

7. Purchase of Land. Near our pumping station lies a tract of lowland upon 
which we have made improvements since the Colony began and which has become a 
lowland grass piece instead of brush land and swamp. This has been partially 
ditched but not underdrained for the reason that to drain this, it would be necessary 
to lower the main ditcli which drains it. which ditch is not on our land. 

8. Construction of Road to Town of Westminster. This pro\ades for the building 
of two and one-half miles of road from the town of Westminster to the Institutio, 
allowing an entrance from tlie East instead of a five-mile detour through Gardner. 
This road would be constructed in cooperation with the Department of Public 
Works, Division of Highways, and the town of Westminster, each to provide one- 
third of the cost. 

9. Additional Colony Group. If indicated to provide for increasing numbers in 
the state. 



8 



P.D. 70. 



10. Employees' Cottage. A duplicate of those vie now have to provide accom- 
modations for housing married employees in buildings other than those occupied by 
patients. 

11. Coal Trestle. Repairs required by the Boston and Maine Railroad upon our 
coal trestle ^vill cost $3,365.60. Because of these repairs at this time and the neces- 
sity for repairs each year, it is recommended that the coal trestle be relocated, 
which will make unnecessary the handhng of coal by wheelbarrows. 

12. Food Conveyors. Food conveyors for the dining-room would result in less 
confusion, waste, noise, breakage of dishes and better service. 

Farm and Grounds 

Operation of the Farm during the year has been very satisfactory. We have a 
sufficient number of vegetables to last us through the year wdth the exception of 
potatoes. This is the first year that the crop of potatoes has been short to a point 
where it is eWdent that some will have to be purchased before another crop is ready. 

The production of milk from our entire herd has averaged 12,500 lbs. per cow. 
By taking calves immediately from reacting mothers and bringing them up in 
separate locations on pasteurized milk, we have now a splendid lot of heifers, all of 
which have recently passed successfully the Federal and State test for tuberculosis. 
From the entire number so brought up one only has reacted in the past two years. 

Forestry work has been continued. This j^ear we have planted 5,000 five-3^ear-old 
white pine trees, 5,000 five-year-old Norway spruce. 

The Annual Meeting of Superintendents, Stev\ards and Head Farmers of all 
hospitals was held here September 11. The day was devoted to ^dsiting of fields, 
inspection of crops, followed by a discussion of matters of interest. 

A large amount ot general work under this heading has been accomphshed such as 
the building of roads, walks, clearing of fields, etc., shown in the following: Lumber, 
(cut and sawed), 46,800 ft. — Native pine, 26,000 tt.; Chestnut, 3,000 ft.; Maple 
and Oak, 2, 100 ft. ; Hemlock, 9,300 ft. ; Spruce, 6,400 ft. ; Fence stakes, 650 ft. ; Fence 
posts, 200 ft. Ice harvested, 1,600 tons. Wood cnt, 535^^ cords. Sawdust, 20 
cords. Stones removed from fields, 3055 tons. Rock excavated, 1065 tons. Earth 
excavated, 2320 cu. yds. Sand and gravel excavated, 728 cu. yds. Road rebuilt, 
3088 2-9 sq. yds. Roads resurfaced, 8695 sq. yds. Walks resurfaced, 230 sq. j^ds. 
Grading, 3368 sq. yds. Land cleared of underbrush, 233^^ acres; Land cleared for 
fields, 1 1-20 acres. Blueberries, 8117 lbs. 

Acknowledgments 

Magazine subscriptions: Mrs. Amie H. Coes, 1058 Main St., Worcester; George 
N. Harwood, BaiTe. Magazines: Dr. P. J. Grant, 68 Parker St., Gardner; Roy 
Mayo, Gardner: Mrs. Chester Pearson, 88 Elm St., Gardner; Ridgley Club, Gard- 
ner; E. L. Godfrey, Gardner; L. M. Gammon, Gardner; Mrs. W. E. Biu-ns, 42 Main 
St., Gardner; ^liss Jennie Taylor, 70 Cross St., Gardner; Post Office, Gardner; Mrs. 
Oliver Schoonmaker, Ashburnham. Books from the Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
Boston; Christian Science Church, A. C. Crocker, Leominster; Distribution Com- 
mittee, 30 Main St., Leominster. Silk pieces, Mrs. R. Y. Fitzgerald, 7 Greenough 
Ave., Jamacia Plain. Packages of gum, tobacco, etc.. Knights of Columbus, 199 
Mass. Ave., Boston. Christmas stockings from Community Ser^vdce, 739 Boylston 
St., Boston. Clu-istmas boxes from American Legion, Room 158, State House, 
Boston. Radio for Assembly Building from Rotary Clubs of Gardner, Fitchburg, 
and Leominster. Donation from John C. Rahm, 145 Walnut St., Leominster. Play 
entitled ''Daddy" given by players from the Universalist Church of Gardner. 
Church Bell for Assembly Building from Officers of the Colony. 

In closing this report for the year I wish to express to you the Board of Trustees 
and to each member my full appreciation of your every assistance and active co- 
operation in the work of the Colony during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, 

Si^perintendent. 



P.D. 70. 



9 



Products of Farm 



Milk, whole 


oDy,4yo . o 


IDS. 


vS$. 1(400 


flf Ofi AO^ AH 
$Zd,4o1 . 4d 


Milk, skim 






(g .U2o2o 


7A 1 
/O. 31 


Cream 


Ooi. . 6 




^ 9t; 
(S) . zo 


00 CQ 

oZ . 00 


JiggS 


1 9CO O 

\.,6bZ l- 


•12 aoz. 


/Wi 7K 


1 AO£! CO 

1,03d. 63 


Eggs 


1 C\CK 1 O 
1,901 l- 


12 


@ . 45 


000 CO 

882. 53 


Asparagus 




IDS. 


1/1 

(ft! . 14 


Q IK 

3 . lo 


Beans, dry 


1 O CO/1 


(< 


W ■ Oo 


TTO /< 

7/3. 64 


Beans, shell 




11 


@ . 05 


A A C 

90. 85 


Beans, string 


19 1 'iS^ZA 






C/l 7C 

o4y . / 


rJeets, table 




(( 


A1 OK 

@ .0125 


A AO OC 

402. 3b 


Beets, stock 


11 Q1 Q 

il,olo 


(( 


^ AAQ9f; 


OA 77 

3b . / / 


Beet greens 


1 1 rt/i 1/ 




W . 1-4 


A A 1 C 

44. lo 


Brussels sprouts 


o 1 / 


(( 


@ . 15 


CO 

. 53 


Cabbage 


or; T/IOl/ 


u 


rrf\ AA7t; 


1 AQ 1 

iy3 . 12 


Carrots, table 




<< 


^ A99C; 


1 AAA KA 

ijUoy . ou 


Carrots, stock 


Z/ ,0Uo 


(< 


AAOOK 


CA Af\ 

09 . 4U 


Laulmower 






/7f\ A/I 

@ . U4 


1 A "71 
10. / 1 


L/elery 


1,00/;^ 


11 


(S . U45 


AA 1 

bO. 18 


Chard, swiss 


11,404^2 


11 


frt\ AQ 

® . Uo 


QA Q dA 

o4o . b4 


Corn, sweet 


oy,iiU/X2 


n 


(•?h aok 
(Si . UZ5 


OCA 1 A 

yoU . ly 


Cucumbers 


lo, (oiy^. 


il 


fri) AQ 
(fi! . Uo 


A1 1 O/l 

411 . y4 


Lettuce 




n 


^ AO 

(g . U2 


CO Q 1 

03 . 31 


Onions 


dD,oy472|t 


<( 


ffT\ AQK 
vii! . UOO 


1 97Q C9 
1,^/ . oZ 


Parsley 




<< 


(n) HAOf; 
^iii . VJ4:Z0 


1 r>A 
1 . uo 


Parsnips 


/I 1 ,4 

o,414 


< ( 


^ AO 

@ . Oo 


1 AO A 

102 . 42 


Peas, green 


7 nooi/ 
/ ,Uyz;J4: 


<( 


fn\ AO 

(s . uy 


AQC QA 

b3o. 3U 


Peppers 


72 


il 


Viy . U4: 


no 

. UZ 


Potatoes 


10,21)5 


11 


iWi AO 

(S . uz 


OA/1 1 A 

ZU4. lb 


Jr^otatoes 


iDy,O0O^ 


n 


(g .Ul/5 


AAQ A/1 

z,yb3 . y4 


Pumpkin 


7*^ 1 

2,/oi 




/Wi A1 
@ . Ul 


07 Q 1 

Z/ . 31 


Rad:shes 


79C 


1 ( 


(rf\ A9 

(ft; . uz 


1 A KA 
14. 00 


Rhubarb 


0,00D>4 


n 


^JTi A1 
(ft . Ui 


QQ CA 
00 . oD 


Scullions 


9 no9l/ 


il 


(ri) A1 R 
(ft . UIO 


Q1 QC 

ol . 00 


opinacn 


1 m 1 
ljUii 


11 


AK 

(ft . Uo 


KA C C 
5U. 00 


Squash, summer 


t; f^CI 
0,001 


11 


A1 K 
(ft . UlO 


CQ 71 
00 . / 1 


Squash, winter 


00 /I /I Al / 

/Z,44d>4 


u 


A99K 

(ft . uzzo 


KAK f\A 
OUO . U4 


Tomatoes 


25,999^ 


11 


(g .02 


520.00 


Turnips, table 


36,748 


11 


@ .0125 


459.35 


Turnips, stock 


6,898 


11 


(§ .00325 


22.42 


Turnip greens 


489 


11 


(g .02 ■ 


9.78 


Apples, jNo. 1 


oy,9d7 




AOC 

(SP .025 


AAO A 

998.43 


Apples, No. 2 


11 00 c ^ / 

ll,ddO^ 


11 


@ .0175 


1 AO 00 

198 38 


Apples, cider 


23,864 


1 1 


@ . 005 


1 1 A 00 

119. 32 


Blackberries 


424 


(I 


(© . 24 


1 A1 T£J 

101 . /b 


Blueberries 


8,11/ 


(I 


/??\ AT 

@ .07 


CAO 1 A 

5b8. 19 


Cherries 


AOS/ 

62% 


u 


rrf\ 1 A 

(ft . lU 


A 00 

D. Zo 


Currants 


7 


It 


rr!\ A7 
(ft .07 


/I A 

.49 


Gooseberries 


Ol / 

3M 


(I 


/TTi A7 

@ .07 


00 
. 23 


Grapes 


4i0 


11 


/Wi A7 

(ft . u/ 


OA AK 

zy . Uo 


Peaches 


1 1 QS/ 
113% 


(I 


^ AO 

(ft . UZ 


00 
Z . Zo 


Pears 


10,63334 


i I 


/S\ A1 T C 

@ .0175 


1 OA AO 

18b. 08 


Plums 


1,210H 


(i 


AO 

@ .03 


0£j 00 

3b. 32 


Raspberries 


46d>^ 


11 


/W\ OA 

(ft . 30 


1 OA AC 

139. 95 


Strawberries 




11 


@ . lb 


OA A A 

89. 44 


Beef 


8,126 


a 


@ . 13 


1 Ae£? 00 

1,05b. 38 


Beef 


1 727 


11 


@ . 17 


2Q3 5Q 


Veal 


1,133 


11 


@ ^22 


249.26 


Pork 


26,728 


u 


@ .15 


4,009.20 


Rabbit 




11 


@ .40 


4.60 



10 






P.D. 70. 


Broilers 
Chicken 
Fowl 
Turkey 


1,4643^ lbs. 

227H " 
l,743j/8 " 
116 


@$.43 
@ .40 
@ .36 
@ .43 


S629.84 
91.00 
627.80 
49.88 


Clover, green 

Hay No. 1 

Hay, Oat 

Hay, Meadow 

Ensilage Corn 

Field Corn 

Field Corn Ensilage 

Mangles 

Oats 

Oat straw 


142.6 tons 
146.35 
19 
22 
430 
16,353 lbs. 
40 tons 
14,746 lbs. 
13,180 " 
11 tons 


@ 7.00 
@22.00 
@18.00 
@14.00 
@ 7.00 
@ .01 
@ 7.00 
@ .00325 
@ .02 
@12.00 


998.20 
3,219.70 
342.00 
308.00 
3,010.00 
163.53 
280.00 
47.92 
263.60 
132.00 


Hides 
Liver 
Manure 


1,515 lbs. 

9753^ " 
1,169.8 tons 


@ .07 
@ .07 
@ 2.50 


106.05 
68.29 
2,924.52 


Lumber, native pine 
Lumber, chestnut 
Lumber, maple and oak 
Lumber, hemlock 
Lumber, spruce 


26,000 ft. 
3,000 " 
2,100 " 
9,300 
6,400 " 


@ .07 
@ .07 
@ .07 
@ .065 
@ .065 


1,820.00 
210.00 
147.00 
604.50 
416.00 


Fence stakes 
Fence posts 


650 
200 


@ .05 
@ .25 


32.50 
50.00 


Wood 

Sawdust 

Ice 


5353^ cords 
20 

1,600 tons 


@10.00 
@ 1.00 
@ 5.50 


5,355.00 
20.00 
8,800.00 



$79,715.25 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

Work Done by Women 

Aprons, various kinds, 903; Bags, various kinds, 487; Baskets, reed, 60; Baskets, 
raffia, 44; Bathrobes, 49; Bedspreads, 67; Bells, large (paper), 4; Bibs, embroidered 
and crocheted, 4; Blankets, 280; Blouse, silk, 1; Blouses, cotton, 4; Booties, 3 pr.; 
Buffet sets, 7; Bureau covers, hemstitched, 110; Bureau scarfs, embroidered, 24; 
Buttons, covered, 56; Burlap, colored, 115 lbs.; Caps, various kinds, 307; Coats, 
dispensary, 21; Coats, dairy, 21; Coasters, reed, 4; Collars, tatted, 2; Collar and 
cuff set, hemstitched, 4; Collar and cuff set, hooked burlap, 2; Combination suits, 4; 
Corset covers, 6; Cradles, reed, 3; Cuffs, 1 pr.; Curtains woven, 1 pr.; Curtains, 
colored, 24 pr.; Clay pottery, 110 pieces; Dishes, cIslj, 30; Doilies, embroidered, 345; 
Dolls, crepe paper, 22; Dolls, cloth, 10; Drawers, cotton, 296 pr.; Flowers, crepe 
paper, 1156; Flowers, ribbon, 12; Handkerchiefs, men's, 348; Handkerchiefs, wo- 
men's, 299; Holders, 150; Insertion, crocheted, 25 yds.; Jardinieres, 10; Jumpers. 
402; Kimonas, 3; Lace, crocheted, 250 yards; Lamps, reed (table), 6; Lamps, reed 
(floor), 6; Lamp shades, 15; Luncheon sets, embroidered, 5; Mats, table (colonial), 
30; Mats, table, crocheted, 30; Machine covers, 4; Material, fancy weave, 60 yards; 
Material, plain weave, 50 yards; Mittens, wool knit, 48 pr.; Mittens, colored, 48 
pr.; Napkins, 221; Nightgowns, 600; Overalls, 400; Petticoats, 145; Pillows and 
pillow tops, 30; Pillow shps, 1595; Pincushions, 7; Plaques, raffia, 3; Raffia, colored. 



P.D. 70. 



11 



18 lbs.; Rags, colored, 900 lbs.; Rugs, braided, 230; Rugs, hooked, 30; Rugs, woven, 
85: Runners, colored, 7; Scarfs, 61; Scarfs, colored, 4; Sheets, 1102; Shoe tops, men's, 
169 pr.; Shoe tops, women's, 50 pr.; Shirtwaists, 4; Slipper tops, 102 pr.; Shppers, 
knitted, 1 pr.; Suspenders, 341 pr.; Table cloths, various kinds, 145; Tatting, 
yds.; Ties, men's, 717; Towels, guest, 16; Towels, plain, 1726; Towels, dish, 611; 
Towels, sanitary, 783; Towelling, woven, 147 yds.; Traj^s, reed, 14; Trousers, 575; 
Tub covers, 5; Tub hammocks, 5; Underdrawers, men's, 483 pr.; Underdrawers, 
women's, 160 pr.; Undervests, men's, 192; Undervests, women's, 466; Valances, 
cretonne, 53; Vanity sets, 66; Vases, reed, 25; Window seat covers, 7; Yarn, colored, 
65 lbs.; Yokes, crocheted, 9. 

Mending 

Aprons, various kinds, 620; Bags, laundry, 80; Bathrobes, 85; Blankets, 35; 
Bureau covers, 15; Chemises, 181; Coats, 1110; Combinations, 5; Corsets, 5; Corset 
covers, 37; Cm-tains, 25 pr.; Dresses, 1543; Flags, 29; Hats, trimmed, 8; Holders, 8; 
Jumpers, 1532; Mittens, 26 pr.; Napkins, 50; Nightgowns, 380; Nightshirts, 200; 
Overalls, 1694; Petticoats, 559; PiUows, sofa, 5; Pillow slips, 100; Rugs, 92; Sheets, 
299; Shirts, outside, 2743; Shirts, under, 1630; Shirtwaists, 6; Skirts, 89; Stockings, 
men's and women's, 11,312; Sweaters, 128; Tablecloths, 25; Towels, 29; Trousers, 
1908; Undervests, women, 295; Union suits, 626; Vests, 183. 

Work Done by Men 
Furniture Department — New Work 
Chairs, dining, 260; chairs, rocking, rattan, 2; chair seats, 2; chair curtains, cel- 
luloid, 4; Frames for blue prints, CO; Mirror frames, 14; Frames, small, 2; Shades, 80; 
Swab handles, 12. 

Repair Work 

Benches and Settees, 14; Chairs, 791; Chiffoniers, 1; Clocks, 7; Cm*tains and rods 
repaired and put up; Desks, 2; Drawers, 6; Fihng Index Cabinet, 1; Graphophones, 
9; Locks, 3; Looms, 3; Piano Stools, 5; Sewing Machines, 2; Scissors and knives 
sharpened, 108; Step Ladder 1; Swabs, 6; Tables, 55; Wheelbarrows, 81; Flower 
boxes, 1; Ice Chest Cover, 1; Pool Table recovered, 1; Mat Frame, 1; Shades turned 
and put up, 148; Mirror frames, 5; Picture frames, 1; Basket, 1; Reed lamp bases, 
6; Clothes closet lock, 1; Book rack, 1; Racks for new garage, 6; Tray bottoms, 38. 

Shoe Department 

Bags, repaired, 3; Belts, repaired, 2; Breeching, repaired, 2; Bridles repaired, 5; 
Brogans made, 273; Collars, repaired, 13; Collar pads, repaired, 2; Girths repaired, 
4; Harnesses repaired, 10; Halters repaired, 30; Heels, rubber, put on, 216; Horse 
Boats, repaired, 4; Martingales, repaired, 1; Mittens, leather, made, 791; Radiator 
Cover, repaired, 1: Reins repaired, 5; Saddles repaired, 1; Shoes, men's and women's, 
678; Shoes, repaired, 2484; Shppers, men's, 154; Snaps, repaired, 1; Straps, various 
kinds, repaired, 33; Team Traces, 1; Trace Snaps, 8. 

Tailoring Department 
Bathrobes cut, 56; Blankets repaired, 7; Caps, cut, 197; Caps, pressed, 189; 
Chemises, cut, 365; Coats, cut, 18; Coats, made, 665; Coats and suits pressed, 802; 
Clothing, patients, pressed and repaired, 4948 pieces; Dresses, cut, 833; Jumpers and 
Overalls cut, 768; Nightgowns, cut, 353; Nightshirts, cut, 302; Petticoats, cut, 39; 
Reefers, cut, 45; Shirts, cut, 210; Shades stitched, 33; Suits, dairy, cut, 52; Trousers, 
cut, 13; Trousers, made, 128; Trousers, pressed, 602; Underwear, men's, cut, 704; 
Underwear, women's, cut, 637; Vests, cut, 17; Vests, made, 2. 

Textile Department 

Bedspread material, 227^ yds. ; Brooms, house, 598; Brooms, barn, 168; Brushes, 
various kinds, 827; Cocoa Mats, 5; Cloth, Khaki, 2629 yds.; Cushions, re-covered 
12; ^Mattresses, 94; Mattresses, made over, 43; Mattresses, Tufts, 20,000; Mittens 
Wristers 234^ yds.; Overall Material, 3419 yds.; Pillows made over, 57; Pocketing 
Material, 11^ yds.; Sheeting, 65 in., 1845 in.; Stockings, 3945; Underwear Wris- 
ters, 486; Underwear Material, 18563^ yds. 



12 P.B. 70. 

DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT 

Preserves, Pickles, Etc. 
Apples, 26 qts.; Beans, string, 255 qts.; Beans, shell, 26 qts.; Beets, 16 qts.; Beets, 
pickled, 26 qts.; Blueberries, 812 qts.; Blackberries, 173 qts.; Cabbage, pickled, 2 
bbls.; Carrots, 3 qts.; Catsup, 2 qts.; Chard, 44 qts.; Chard, pickled, 13^ qts.; 
Cherries, 22 qts.; Chow Chow, 53 qts.; Corn, 47 qts.; Conserve, 1^ qts.; Cucumber, 
pickle, 549 qts.; Cucumber, salted, 3 bu.; Jam, 48 glasses; Jelly, 438 glasses; Marma- 
lade, 4 qts. ; Mincemeat, 174 qts. ; Onion, pickled, 3 qts. ; Peas, 215 qts. ; Peaches, 108 
qts.: Pears, 282 qts.; Pears, pickled, 14 qts.; Plums, 144 qts.; Pickles, mustard, 151 
qts.; Piccahlh, 93 qts.; Pumpkin, 2 qts.; Raspberries, 178 qts.; Rhubarb. 196 qts.; 
Strawberries, 117 qts.; Squash, 343^2 qts.; Tomatoes, 5833/^ qts.; Tomato, pickle, 
133 qts. 

Fruits and Vegetables Canned at Cannery 
Apples, 787 gal.; Beans, string, 1442 gal.; Blueberries, 611 gal.; Chard, 161 gal.: 
Corn, 940 gal; Tomatoes, 1526 gal. 

VALUATION 

November 30, 1925 

Real Estate 

Land (1,848 acres) $ 36,950.00 

Buildings 843,696.80 

i 880,646.80 

Personal Property 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses $ 3,623 . 83 

Food 9,266.43 

Clothing and Materials 24,507 . 65 

Furnishings and Household Supplies 125,212 . 58 

Medical and General Care 3,364 . 50 

Heat, Light and Power 9,258 . 54 

Farm 47,497.49 

Garage, Stable and Grounds 8.'254 . 75 

Repairs 8,945.63 

$ 239,931.40 

Summary 

Real Estate $ 880,646.80 

Personal Property 239,931 . 40 



$1,120,578.20 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for the 
fiscal year ending November 30, 1925: 

Cash Account 

Jnamu Receipts 
Board of Patients: — 

Private $6,148.57 

Reimbursements 9,898.03 

$16,046.60 

Personal services: — 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 82 . 47 

Sales: — 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses, Keys $1.00 

Food 2,626.95 

Clothing and Materials 309 . 40 

Furnishings and Household Supplies 94.30 

Com. on Tel. Calls 11.40 

Hardware 60.96 

Farm: — 

Pigs, hogs and guinea pigs $57 . 00 

Vegetables 4.74 

Shoeing oxen 8 .98 

70.72 

Old barrels 12 .75 

Arte and Crafts Sales 944 . 08 

Total sales 4,131.56 

Miscellaneous: — 

Interest on bank balances $721 . 17 

Rent 74.82 

Overage on Cash Book 1 . 05 

797.04 

Total income .'. . . $21,057 .67 



P.D. 70. 13 

Mauvtenance 

Balance from previous year, brought forward $ 12,669 . 46 

Appropriations, current year 359,585 .00 



Total $372,254.46 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 346,934 . 06 



Balance $25,320.40 



. ' Analysis of Expenses 

Personal services $164,112.44 

Religious instruction 1,258.50 

Travel, Transportation and Of&ce expenses 3,640 . 59 

Food 49,731.25 

Clothing and materials 12,588 .51 

Furnishi ngs and household supplies 1 7, 749 . 02 

Medical and general care 12,654 . 23 

Heat, light and power 26,250 . 3 1 

Farm 27,566.83 

Graragc, stable and grounds 5,324 . 98 

Repairs ordinary 14,224.00 

Repairs and renewals 11,833.40 



Total expenses for Maintenance $346,934 . 06 



Special Approprtattons 

Balance December 1, 1924 $ 46,275 .04 

Appropriations for current year 10. 000,00 



Total $ 56,275.04 

Expended during the year fsee statement below) $15,980 . 12 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 1 . 49 

15,981.61 



Balance November 30, 1925, carried to next year $ 40,293 . 43 



Object 


Act or 
Resolve 


Whole 
Amount 


Expended 

during 
Fiscal Year 


Total 
Expended 
to Date 


Balance 
at End of 
ofYear 


Alt. in Infirmaries 

*Alt. in Domestic Bldg 

Addl. Water Supply 

Garage and Fire Station 

Fairview Cottage 

Add'l. Fire Protection 

Fire Protection 1925 


Chap. 126, Acts 1923 
Chap. 126, Acts 1923 
Chap. 126, Acts 1924 
Chap. 126, Acts 1924 
Chap. 126, Acts 1924 
Chap. 510, Acts 1924 
Chap. 347, Acts 1925 


$ 12,000.00 
47,000.00 
35.000.00 
6,000.00 
9,000.00 
2,500.00 
4,000.00 


$99.31 
10,168.62 
305.40 
3,466.95 
1,939.84 


$46,998.51 
11,329.20 
5,736.19 
8,832.57 
2,308.61 


$12,000.00 
1.49 
23,670.80 
263.81 
167.43 
191.39 
4,000.00 


$115,500.00 


$15,980.12 


$75,205.08 


$40,294.92 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Conunonwealth during year (mark item with *) $1 . 49 

Balance carried to next year " $40,293 . 43 



Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been: 940.45 at Hospital ; 37.80, Familv Care. Total, 978.25 . 

Total cost for maintenance, $346,934.06. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $6.82. (52 weeks to year). 

Receipt from sales, $4131.56. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.08 

All other institution receipts, $16,926.11 

Equal to a weekly per capita of f .33 

Net weekly per capita $6.41. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 



Total receipts and payments are in agreement with Comptroller's books of accoun t s. 



James C. McCormick. 



14 



P.D. 70. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American PsychiaI'rtc Association 

PKESCRIBED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 

Table 1 — General Information 



Date of opening as an institution for the insane: Oct. 22, 1S02. 
T>-pe of institution: State. 
Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property 

Real estate including buildings 

Personal property 



Total 

Total acreage of hospital property owned: 1,848.5 
Additional acreage rented : None. 

4. Officers and employees: 



Superintendents . . . 
Assistant phj-sicians . 
Medical internes. . . 
Clinical assistants . . 



Total physicians 

Stewareds 

Resident dentists , 

Graduate nurses 

Other nurses and attendants 

Teachers of occupational therapy . 

Social workers 

All other officers and employees . . 



Total officers and employees 

5. Census of patient population at end of year: 



White: 

Insane 

Mental defectives . 

Alcoholics 

Drug addicts 



Total 

Colored: 

Insane 

Mental defectives, 



Total 

Grand total . 



Actually in Service at 

End of Year 
M. F. T. 
1 - 1 

3-3 



$ 880,546.80 
239,93 L 40 



$1,120,478.20 



Vacancies at End 

OF Year 
M. F. T. 

1 1 

1 - 1 



4 




4 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 








1 




1 










3 


3 








50 


36 


86 


3 


1 


4 


5 


5 


10 










1 


1 








45 


42 


87 


5 


2 


7 


106 


87 


193 


9 


4 


13 




Actually in 




Absent from In- 




Institution 




stitution BUT 








STILL ON BOOKS 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


455 


323 


778 


28 


48 


76 


53 


44 


97 


3 


6 


9 


51 


12 


63 


2 




2 


2 




2 








561 


379 


940 


33 


54 


87 


4 


7 


11 








2 


1 


3 




















6 


8 


14 








567 


387 


954 


33 


54 


87 




M. 




F. 




T. 


: on 














501 




247 




748 



on date of report 

Average daily number of patients actusHy in institution during year 567.463 370.384 

Voluntarj' patients admitted during year 5 5 

Persons given advice or treatment in out patient clinics during year. . 31 28 



937. 
10 



Table 2 — Financial Statement 
See Treasurer's Report for data requested under this table. 



P.D. 70. 



15 



Table 3 — Movement of Insmie Patient Population j or Year ending 
' September 30, 1925 



M. 


F. 


T. 


591 


430 


1021 


44 


25 


69 


12 


9 


21 


12 


17 


29 


68 


51 


119 


659 


481 


1140 


34 


23 . 


57 


13 


2 


15 


11 


1 7 


OQ 
ZB 




2 


9 


3 


2 


5 


1 




1 




1 


1 


24 


16 


40 


59 


40 


99 


600 


441 


1041 



Insane patients on books of institution at beginning of institution j ear. . . 
Admissions during year: 

a. First admissions 

b. Readmissions 

c. Transfers from other institutions for mental diseases 

Total received during year 

Total on books during year 

Discharged from books during year: 

a. As recovered 

b. As improved 

c. As unimproved 

d. As without psychosis 

e. Transferred to other institutions for mental diseases 

Nom. dis. for Com 

/. Died during year 

Total discharged, transferred and died during yea r 

Insane patients remaining on books of institution at end of institution year 



Table 4 — Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions for the 
Year Ending September 30, 1925 



Nativity 



United States 

•Canada 

England 

FiiJand 

Germany .... 

Holland 

Ireland 

Italy 

Norway 

Poland 

Sweden 

Unascertained 

Total. . . . 



Patients 



M. 



30 21 51 



Parents of 


Parents of 


Male Patients 


Female Patients 


F.i 




Both 


Fi. 




Both 


14 


14 


28 




7 


14 


6 


5 


11 




3 


7 


2 


2 


4 




1 


3 


2 


2 


4 




1 


2 




1 


1 
















1 


1 


2 


2 


4 




1 


2 










1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








2 


2 


4 








1 


1 


2 




4 

2 


8 
3 


30 


30 


60 


21 


21 


42 



1 Fathers. ^Mothers. 'Includes Newfoundland. 



Table 5 — Citizenship of First Admissions for the Year Ending September 30, 1925 



Citizens by birth 

Citizens by naturalization 

.Aliens 

Citizenship unascertained 

Total 



M. 


F. 


T. 


21 


11 


32 


2 


4 


6 




6 


13 


30 


21 


51 



16 P.D. 70. 

Table 6 — Psychoses of First Admissions for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 



Traumatic psychoses 

Senile psychoses 

Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclesrois 

General paralysis 

Psychoses with cerebral sj-philis 

Ps\ choses with Huntington's choresa 

Psychoses with brain tumor 

Psj choses with other brain or nervous diseases, total* . . . 

Other diseases 

Alcoholic psychoses, total 

Acute hallucinosis 

Psj choses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 

Psychoses with pellagra 

Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 

Other diseases or conditions 

Manic-depressive psychoses, total 

Manic type 

Depressive tj-pe 

Involution melancholia 

Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions 

Epileptic psychoses 

Psychoneruoses and neuroses, total 

Hysterical type 

Psychasthenic tj-pe (anxiety and obsessive forms) 

Neurasthenic type 

Psychoses with psychopathic personality 

Psj choses with mental deficiency 

Undiagnosed psychoses 

TVithout psychosis, total 

Mental deficiency without psychosis 

Others " 



Total. 



M. 



M. 


F. 


T. 


. 6 


5 


11 


5 


3 


8 




1 


2 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


2 


6 


1 


7 


1 


5 


6 


- 
4 


- 
2 


- 
6 






I 




1 


1 


3 


1 


4 


30 


21 


51 



Table 7 — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Race 


Total 


Senile 


With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerosis 


General 
paralysis 


With 
other 
brain or 
nervous 
diseases 


Alcoholic 


With 
other 
somatic 
diseases 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 


15 


9 


24 


5 


3 


8 


3 


1 


4 














1 




1 








Finnish 


2 


1 


3 






































French 


5 


3 


8 


1 






1 




1 








1 




1 










1 


1 


Irish 


2 


1 


3 








1 


1 


2 


















1 












1 


1 
















1 


1 




















Lithuanian 


2 




2 






































Scandinavian t 


2 


4 


6 




1 


1 




1 


1 






















1 


1 


Mixed 


2 


1 


3 






































Race unascertained 




1 


1 




1 


1 
































Total 


30 


21 


51 


6 


5 


11 


5 


3 


8 


1 




2 


1 




1 


2 




2 




2 


2 



^Includes "North" and "South", t Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



P.D. 70. 



17 



Table 7 — Race of First Admissions classified xoith Reference to Priiicipal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1925 — Concluded 



Total. 



Race 



Manic- 



M. 



Dementia 
prsecox 



Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses 



With 
psycho- 
pathic 
person- 
ality 



M. 



With 
mental 
deficiency 



t Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



Table 8 — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Total 


Under 
15 Years 


15—19 
Years 


20—24 
Years 


25-29 
Years 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




6 


5 


11 


























With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


5 


3 


8 




























1 


1 


2 


























With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 




1 


























Alcoholic 


2 




2 


























With other somatic diseases 




2 


2 
















1 


1 








Manic-depressive 


6 


1 


7 


























Dementia praecox 


1 


5 


6 








1 




1 










1 


1 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


4 


2 


6 




















1 






With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 






























1 


1 




























3 


1 


4 
















1 


1 








Total 


30 


21 


IT 








1 




1 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 



Table 8 — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 19 2 — Continued 





30—34 


35—39 


40—44 


45—49 


50—54 


Psychoses 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Yeaes 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 
































With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




































1 


1 


1 




1 








































1 




1 








Alcoholic 








1 




1 








1 




1 








With other somatic diseases 






















1 


1 










2 




9 


2 




2 








1 




1 












2 


2 




2 


2 






















1 




1 


2 




2 




1 


1 














With psychopathic personality 


























1 




1 


With mental deficiency 










1 


1 




























1 




1 








1 




1 








Total 


3 


3 






3 


10 




1 


1 


4 


1 


5 


1 




1 



18 



P.D. 70. 



Table 8 — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psijchoses 
for the Year ending Septe?nber 30, 1925 — Concluded 





55— .59 


60—64 


65—69 


70 years 


Unascer- 


Psychoses 


Years 


Years 


Years 


and over 


tained 


[ M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T 


Senile 








1 


- 


1 


2 




-2 


3 


5 


8 


- 








1 1 


1 


2 








4 


1 


5 




1 


1 










1 - 






























Alcoholi? 
































With other somatic diseases 


i ~ 


































1 


1 


1 




1 






















1 - 
































1 




















1 


1 








With psychopathic personality 
































With mental deficiency 


1 
































! 1 




1 


























Total 


2 


2 


4 


2 




2 




1 


7 


3 


7 


10 









Table 9 — Degree of Education of First Admission classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Total 


Illit- 
erate 


Reads 

AND 

Writes* 


Com- 
mon 

School 


High 
School 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


6 


5 


11 
8 








2 


1 
1 


3 


2 


4 


6 


2 




2 




5 


3 








2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 




2 


General paralysis 


1 


1 


2 














1 


1 


2 








V\ ith other brain or nervous diseases 


1 




1 














1 




1 








Alcoholic 


2 




2 














2 




2 








With other somatic diseases 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 


1 








Manic-depressive 


6 


1 


7 








4 


1 


5 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Dementia praecox 


1 


5 


6 










1 


1 


1 


2 


3 




2 


2 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


4 


2 


6 










3 


2 


5 


1 




1 


With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 














1 




1 












1 


1 














1 


1 








Without Dsvchosis 


3 


1 


4 


2 




2 




1 


1 








1 




1 


























Total 




30 


21 


51 


2 




2 


8 


6 


14 


13 


13 


26 


7 





9 



















•Includes those who do not complete fourth grade in school. 



Table 10 — Environment of. First Adfnissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September SO, 1925 



Psychoses 



Senile 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

General paralysis 

With other brain or nervous diseases . 

.Alcoholic 

With other somatic diseases 

Manic-depressive 

Dementia praecox 

Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

With psychopathic personality 

With mental deficiency 

Without psychosis 

Total 



Total 


Urban 


Rural 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


Y. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


6 


5 


11 


6 


5 


11 








5 


3 


8 


4 


3 


7 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








1 




i 


1 




1 








2 




2 


2 




2 










2 


2 




2 


2 








6 


1 


7 


5 


1 


6 


1 




1 


1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 








4 


I 


6 


4 


2 


6 








1 




1 


1 




1 










1 


1 




1 


1 








3 


1 


4 


3 


1 


4 








30 


21 


51 


28 


21 


49 


2 




2 



P.D. 70. 



19 



Table 11 — Economic Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 





Total 


Dependent 


Marginal 


Comfortable 


rSYCHOSES 




























IVl. 


r . 


TP 


M. 


v 
r . 


i. 


m. 


r. 


i. 


M, 


r. 


1 . 







5 


11 




2. 


4 


6 




3 


1 


3 


4 




5 


3 


8 






3 




2 


2 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 
















With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 




1 










- 




1 


- 


1 


Alcoholic 


2 




2 








2 




2 








With other somatic diseases 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 


1 


Manic-depressive 


6 


1 


7 








6 


1 


7 








Dementia praecox 


1 


5 


6 








1 


3 


4 




2 


2 




4 


2 


6 




1 


1 


3 




3 


1 


1 


2 


With psychopathic personality .... 


1 




1 








1 




1 








With mental deficiency 




1 


1 










1 


1 










3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Total 


30 


21 


51 


7 


4 


11 


17 


8 


25 


6 


9 


15 



Table 12 — C/se of Alcohol by First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Total 


Abstinent 


Temperate 


Intemperate 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


6 


5 


11 


3 


5 


8 








3 




3 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


5 


3 


8 




3 




1 




1 


2 




2 


General paralj'sis 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 














With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 




i 


1 




1 














Alcoholic 


2 




2 














2 




2 


With other somatic diseases 




2 


2 




2 


















6 


1 


7 


3 


i 


4 


2 




2 


1 




1 




1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 














Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


4 


2 


6 


1 


2 


3 


3 




3 








With psychopathic personality .... 


1 




1 








1 




1 








With mental deficiency 




1 


1 




1 


1 














Without psychosis 


0, 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Total 


30 


21 


51 


13 


21 


34 


8 




8 


9 




9 



Table 13 — Marital Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Total 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Separated 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


6 


5 


11 




2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


2 


6 








With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


5 


3 


8 


1 




1 


3 


1 


4 


1 


2 


3 








General paralysis 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 














With other brain or nervous diseases . . 


1 




1 








1 




1 














Alcoholic 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 














With other somatic diseases 




2 


2 










2 


2 














Manic-depressive 


6 


1 








4 


1 


1 


2 








1 




1 


Dementia praecox 


1 


5 


6 




2 


3 




3 


3 














Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


4 


2 


6 






2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 






1 




















With mental deficiency 




1 


1 










1 


1 














Without psychosis 


3 


1 


4 




1 


2 


1 




1 








1 




1 


Total 


30 


21 


51 


11 


5 


16 


11 


11 


22 


6 


5 


11 


2 




2 



Table 14 — Psychoses of Readmissions for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Males 


Females 


Total 






1 


1 




3 




8 


Dementia praecox 


4 


'a 


7 




1 




1 




1 




1 


Total 


9 


9 


18 





20 



P.D. 70. 



Table 15 — Discharges of Patierrts classified icith Reference to Principal Psychoses 
and Condition on Discharge for the Year ending September SO, 1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Recovered 


Improved 


UMiIPR0\T:D 


WiTHOrT 

Psychosis 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


p 


T. 


Alcoholic 


5 




5 


2 




2 


2 




2 
3 


1 




1 








With other somatic diseases 




3 


3 










3 
















5 


3 


8 






1 


4 


3 
















Involution melancholia 




1 


1 










1 


















3 


7 


10 


1 


1 


2 


1 


6 




1 














2 


1 


3 










1 




2 




2 








With psy chopathic personality 


1 




1 








1 


















With mental deficiency 




2 


2 










1 






1 


1 








Without psj-c^iosis 


2 


2 


4 


















2 


2 


4 
































Total 


18 


19 


37 


4 


1 


5 


8 


15 


23 


4 


1 


5 


2 


2 


4 





















Table 16 — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



CAUSES OF DEATH 


Total 




enile 


i With 
1 cerebral 
j arterio- 
1 clerosiss 


General 
paralj^is 


Alcoholic 


Manic- 
depres- 
sive 


Involu- 
tion 

melan- 
cholia 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


General Diseases 












































Tuberculosis of lungs 


5 


3 


8 






































Cancer 


3 


1 


4 






































Nervous System 












































Apoplexy (cerebral hemorr- 












































hage) 


2 


5 


7 




2 


2 


1 






1 




1 




















Other diseases of nervous 


















































1 






































CmcrLATORY System 












































Endocarditis and myocardi- 












































tis 


9 


4 


13 


1 


2 


3 


2 




2 


1 










2 














Other diseases of the heart . . 




1 


1 




1 


1 
































Respiratory System 














































2 


1 


3 










1 


2 


























Lobar pneumonia 


1 




1 






































Digestive System 












































Other diseases of the stom- 












































ach (cancer excepted) .... 












































Other diseases of liver 


1 




1 






































Total 


24 


16 


40 


1 




6 


4 


1 


5 


2 




2 


3 


1 


4 




1 


1 









Table 16 — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified v:ith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 — Concluded 



CAUSES OF DEATH 


Dementia 
prsECox 


Paranoia 
or para- 
noid con- 
ditions 


Epileptic 
psychoses 

and 
neuroses 


Psycho- 
neuroses 


With 
psycho- 
pathic 
personal- 
ailty 


With 
mental 
deficiency 


*A11 
other 
psychoses 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


General Diseases 

Tuberculosis of lungs 

Cancer 

XERvors System 

Apoplexy (cerebral hemorr- 
hage) 


4 


3 


















1 


1 








1 




1 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 


1 

o 

1 
1 

1 


Other diseases of nervous 
system 
















CtRCTLATOEY SySTEM 

Endocarditis and myocar- 
ditis 

Respiratory System 


2 

1 
1 

1 

9 


1 
4 


3 

1 
1 

13 






























1 


1 


Lobar pneumonia 






































Digestive System 
Other diseases of liver 

Total 


















1 








2 




2 


3 


3 


6 



P.D. 70. 



21 




I 








II ■ ■ i ' 


4; zL 






t — 1 


t 


s - 


































2 












— — CO 



.3 

1 




rt — "C 






>r. — .^_i|c* 






2 







i 

li 



ilii 



s 



- ! I I — 



— o 

OK* 



II 

HIS 



Hi 



22 



P.D. 70. 



Table 18 — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 



Psychoses 


Total 


Less than 
1 Month 


1—3 
Months 


4—7 
Months 


8—12 
Months 


1—2 
Years 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


jM. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


. — . 

Seaile 


1 


5 


6 


1 




1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 




- 






1 


1 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 




5 




1 


1 














1 




1 


3 




3 




2 




2 


























2 




2 




3 


1 


4 
































With other somatic diseases 




1 


1 






















1 


1 












1 


1 




























1 


1 


Dementia praeoox 


9 


4 


3 


























2 


1 


3 






1 












1 


1 




















With mental deficiency 


2 




2 


























1 




1 




3 


2 


5 
































Total 


24 


16 


40 


1 


1 


2 




3 


3 








1 


1 


2 


8 


3 


11 



Table 18 — Total Duration of Hospital Lift of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1925 — 
Concluded. 



Psychoses 



Senile 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

General paralysis 

Alcoholic 

With other somatic diseases . 

M anic-depressi ve 

Dementia praecox 

Psy:honeuroses and neuroses 

With mental deficiency 

Without psychosis 

Total 



3—4 
Years 



M. F. .T 



5—9 
Years 



M. F. T, 



10—15 
Years 



M. F. T 



15—19 
Years 



M. F. T, 



Table 19 — Family Care Department 



Piemaining September 39, 1925 

Admitted within the year 

Whole number of cases within the year . . . . 
Dismissed within the year 

Returned to Institution 

Discharged 

Escaped 

Dismissed to Visit 

Died 

Remaining September 30, 1925 

Supported by the State 

Sslf-supporting 

Private 

Number of different persons within the year 

Number of different persons admitted 

Number of different persons dismissed 

Daily average number 

State 

Self-supporting 

Private 



Male Female 



7 
4 
3 

7 
7 

3 

.431 
.085 



3 
2 

1.346 



40 
15 
55 
15 
13 

1 
1 

40 
37 
3 

21 
15 
15 

39.115 
36.001 
3.114 



Public Document No. 70 



O/he (Cummanuiealth uf iHasHacljuactt! 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



THE TRUSTEES 



OF THK 

Gardner State Colony 

FOU THE 

YEAR EXDINXt NOVEMBEH 80. 1926 



Department of Mentai, Diseases 




PPBLICATIOX OF THIS DOCI MENT APPROVED BV THE COMMISSION ON A r>MIM STK ATION AND FiNANt E 

660. 5-'2T. Order 8989. 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE COLONY 
PRINTERS 

7< 



TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 
of the 



' BQ8(BgatRDNER STATE COLONY 



J I BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

FRE^felic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 
Thomas R. P. Gibb, Rockport, Mass. 
George N. Harwood, Barre, Mass. 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner, Mass. 
Mrs. Alice M. Spring, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg, Mass. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
Lonnie 0. Farrar, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 

, Senior Assistant Physician. 

Cesareo DeAsis, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

, Assistant Physician. 

J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myroj^ L. Marr, Steward. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Maurice S. Powell, Head Farmer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
, Social Service Worker. 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A, Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
David Profit, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Neilson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
John H. Jenkins, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Walter Warman, Supervisor of Pottery. 
Edward C. Corey, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS 
Elvira I. Winchenbach, R.N., Women's Infirmary. 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, R.N-, Hospital. 



Matrons 

Mrs. Katherine Bowman 

Mrs. Myrtie Sprague 

Mrs. Mertie Morse 

Mrs. Minnie Larkin 

Mrs. Mabel Sanderson 

Mrs. Gladys Bennett 

Mrs. Mary Staples 



COLONIES 

Belcher Cottage 
Hillcrest Cottage 
Valley Cottage 
Gardner Cottage 
Fairview Cottage 
Overlook Cottage 
Highland Cottage 
Wachusett Cottage 
Westminster Cottage 



Supervisors 



Streeter G. Sprague 
Fred Morse 
Herbert F. Larkin 



Wilton C. Clark 
Eugene L. Bryant 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES 



Rev. Jame& T. Reilly, Catholic 



Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 



Local Pasters in turn, Protestant, 



TRUSTEES' ^REPORT 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

We have the honor to present herewith the twenty-fourth annual report of the 
Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

Your Trustees have met regularly once a month during the year, have made 
frequent visits to the Colony and have kept in close touch with its operations. 

The Trustees have watched with much interest and satisfaction the development 
of the industries by the patients. They are entirely convinced that the industrial 
work which is carried on is by far the best treatment for such patients as are able 
to undertake it. The State is saved much money as the Colony makes all its own 
furniture, shoes and clothing, and the work is well done and very creditable. It 
weaves cloth for bed linen and garments. The patients have made many handsome 
braided rugs and decorative articles for the use of the institution. The Colony has 
lived well within its appropriation for the year. 

The Trustees are pleased at the completion of the installation of the water line 
connecting the Colony's water pipes with the Gardner water supply. This funda- 
mental need for comfort, convenience and safety against fire and disease has been 
long recommended. Its final provision by the Commonwealth is a source of great 
satisfaction. 

They further record their gratification that a building for the intensive treatment 
of women has been authorized during the year and is now well on toward completion. 
This wuU make it possible to separate the noisy and destructive women from the 
old and infirm and quiet, all of whom are now housed together in the women's 
infirmary building. This is a most important advance and one long desired. 

The Trustees would emphasize the need of a similar building for the men. It is 
hoped that the coming year will see provision made for it. They would again speak 
of the need for a house for the Superintendent. In the long run the Commonwealth 
will fare just as private industry does and get the kind of man that it pays for. 
There will always be a few first-rate men who will serve the Commonwealth as 
superintendents and physicians of the hospitals at a small salary and with trying 
living conditions for themselves and families. They will make this sacrifice for 
the sake of the service which they render humanity. The State should not, however, 
and cannot afford to depend upon this. Salaries should be suitable and living 
conditions made right and reasonable in order that the Commonwealth may com- 
mand the services of first-rate men. A far-sighted policy would recognize that 
this makes for efficiency and, therefore, economy in the long run. No superin- 
tendent can give his best service to an insane hospital when he is obliged to live 
in constant close touch with his very trying sights and problem.s. He should have 
a house on the grounds a little removed from the patients' buildings, to which he 
can withdraw and get some relaxation from his onerous and responsible duties. 

The Trustees are gratified to know that at the request of His Execllency the 
Governor the Board of Administration and Finance has made a careful survey of 
the s'alaries paid state officials. The inadequacy of the salaries of the assistant 
physicians at the Gardner State Colony has been most apparent lately. The 
position of Setlior Assistant Physician became vacant during the year and it has 
been impossible to find a suitable person to fill this position at the salary authorized. 
It is hoped that the report of the Commissioner of Administration and Finance 
will recommend a suitable increase in these salaries. The attention of the De- 
partment of Mental Diseases was called to this matter in a letter written by the 
Secretary of this Board on November 15, 1926. 

In the Superintendent's report a ten years construction program is outlined. 
This has been made at the req,U€st of the Department of Mental Diseases and is 
an important statement of what will be necessary if the Colony is to grow and to 



4 



P.D. 70 



improve its service. 

Attention is invited to the appended report of Dr. Charles E. Thompson our 
Superintendent. Doctor Thompson's services to the Commonwealth this year, 
as always, have been faithful and able. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AMIE H. GOES, OWEN A. HOBAN, 

THOMAS R. P. GIBB, THOMAS H. SHEA, 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD, ALICE M. SPRING, 
January 8, 1927 FREDERIC A. WASHBURN, M.D., Chairman. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

Respectfully submitted herewith is my report as Superintendent of the State 
Colony for the fiscal year ending November 30 and the hospital year ending 
September 30, 1926. This is the twenty-fourth annual report of the State Colony. 

STATISTICAL RESUME 
There remained Sept. 30, 1925, 1041 patients. There remained Sept. 30, 1926, 
1118. The number resident on this date was 1011 and in addition there were in 
"Family Care" 51. During the year, 187 new patients have been admitted. 105 
of these were received by direct commitment and 82 were received by transfer from 
other hospitals because of overcrowding there. Of the 105 direct commitments, 
86 were committed for the first time to any hospital and 19 had had previous 
hospital care. 51 have been discharged during the year, 9 as recovered, 18 as 
improved, 10 as unimproved, 14 not insane, 57 were removed by death. 

Family Care 

Continuing the "Family Care" system established in 1915, we commenced the 
year with 47 so cared for, 27 have been admitted to this department during the year 
and 23 have been discharged. We closed the year with 51 patients. 43 of these 
are supported at the State's expense and 8 are self-supporting. While this de- 
partment has shown growth each year and at this time gives evidence of consider- 
able extension in the near future, our chief difficulty lies in obtaining suitable homes 
within reasonable distance of the hospital from which supervision and medical 
attention can more easily be given. We are now endeavoring to obtain satisfactory 
nearby homes into which a different class of patients, that is, those of more recent 
onset, may be sent, but up to the present time our available homes have been at 
considerable distance in a rural community, making it difficult to supervise but 
more especially inadvisable to try out more recent cases of mental disease. 

The General Health 
of our entire population both patients and employees has been good. There 
has been no serious outbreak of any contagious disease. 27 cases of measles develop- 
ed early in the year, 10 of these being among employees and 3 among children of 
employees, 14 among patients. All cases were of relatively light severity. In June 
there was a mild epidemic of an enteric disturbance which seemed to be com- 
mon to all hospitals at the time. Diligent search to discover the source of the 
infection, as infection it seemed to be, failed to show the origin. It apparently had 
no connection, whatever, with the food supply. In certain other hospitals where 
at the time the epidemic was severe, study of the situation by expert health 
officers failed to locate the source of infection. 

Prophylactic treatment of typhoid and variola has been for several years given 
to all newly admitted patients and to all employees, and repeated at prescribed 
intervals. 



P.D. 70 



5 



Extra Mural Activities 
At Fitchburg, the nearest large city, we have continued to hold monthly Clinics 
to which anyone may come for advice and at which patients who are referred 
are examined. In addition, our physicians answer all calls to see patients in their 
homes without expense to the family. More and more those who are beginning to 
show signs of nervous or mental disease are seen before admission. Fifty- two per- 
sons have been examined during the year. 

We have continued to examine children who are backward in the public schools, 
cooperating with the school superintendents. Eighty-six have been examined. 
Examinations made are reviewed at the Medical Staff Meetings held daily and 
our findings submitted in a written report to the school superintendent. Of the 
86 examined, 27 were found sufficiently retarded to require training in special 
classes, 2 required institutional care; in 46 the recommendation was made to con- 
tinue the child in grade and in 11 instances it was determined that the child had 
reach ed the limit of scholastic attainment. School superintendents are actively 
cooperating to carry our recommendations into effect. This work carried on as it is 
throughout the State should result in tremendous good, not only to the individual 
child who is found to require special attention, but to other children who are 
more apt in their studies and who readily advance in their school work. One 
outstanding feature continually presenting itself to us is the large number of phy- 
sical defects found and again found upon re-examination. It does not seem that 
enough is being done by the public school authorities to remedy these defects. 
The defects referred to are chiefly tonsils, adenoids, poor teeth, poor eyes and 
malnutrition. 

Therapy 

Occupational and Industrial Therapy have continued to receive our active 
interest, believing as we always have that this is the most beneficial form of treat- 
ment a state hospital has. At our daily Staff Meetings, at which all our new cases 
are examined and discussed, suitable Occupational Therapy is prescribed in each 
case. Our activities are divided into three groups: Hospital Industries, Hospital 
Occupations and strictly Industrial Therapy. A prescription in each case is written 
for the guidance of the instructor. An average of 85% of all patients have been 
daily occupied, chiefly along productive and creative lines. 

The number employed in our Women's Industrial Building has not been quite 
as large this year as formerly owing to an increased number of disturbed who are 
unsuitable to go to this building, and also because of the number of elderly and 
infirm persons who have been admitted during the year. Nevertheless, interest 
in this activity has been keen. Much interest has been shown in the making of 
decorative articles for the various buildings and particularly in paper work used in 
decorations for parties. 

At the Men's Industrial Department we have continued to repair all furniture 
and to construct all new furniture as needed. In the shoe department special 
activity has been shown. It is of note that since 1909 we have been able to make 
and repair all shoes used and have purchased none. With the increasing number 
of patients this department of necessity is becoming more active each year. In 
the textile department more has been accomplished than in any previous year. 
Here is woven all toweling, cloth for shirting, overalls, jumpers, Hnings, all khaki 
cloth for Summer suiting, blankets, bed spreads, and an increasing amount of 
sheeting. An additional power loom has recently been installed upon which to 
make our gingham for women's dresses. An automatic stocking machine has been 
added as it was found that with the increasing number of patients it was too 
monotonous an occupation to make so many stockings on hand machines. All 
underwear has been knitted. In other words, this room is doing each year an 
increasing amount of work and providing our folks with clothing and bedding. 
Industrial Therapy has received special attention in the detached cottages 



c 



P.D. 70 



especially for women, under the direction of the Head Occupational Therapist who 
makes frequent visits to these departments. The attendants in these departments 
receive regular instructions in Occupational Therapy to make them more fit to do 
the work in their own similar departments. 

Hydrotherapeutic treatment has been further stimulated this year under the 
direction of a full time trained Hydrotherapist. Restraint or seclusion or control 
by strong drugs is not practiced. The following table shows the amount of treat- 
ment by hydrotherapy: 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Salt glows 


199 


212 


411 


Saline baths 


409 


317 


725 


Tub shampoo 


263 


253 


516 


Hair shampoo 


270 


251 


521 


Hot and cold to spine 





12 


12 


Foot baths as preparatory treatment 





38 


38 


Needle spray 


816 


824 


1640 


Fan douche 


734 


723 


1457 


Jet douche 


5 





5 


Fomentations 


7 


2 


9 


Continuous baths 






1011 


Wet sheet packs 






2994 



Dental 

Benefit difficult to accurately determine has been derived from the amount of 
work accomplished by the Dentist and Dental Hygienist who have given full time 
to the w ork. The following table shows briefly the amount of work accomplished : 



Examinations 1624 

Prophylaxes 1352 

Fillings 765 

Amalgam 469 

Cement 79 

Synthetic , 185 

Gutta percha 16 

Gold 11 

Zinc Oxide 5 

Extractions under local anaesthesia 729 

Extractions under general anaesthesia 28 

Extractions without anaesthesia 47 

Minor surgical operations 19 

Treatments < 258 

Plates made and repaired 46 

Bridge work 2 

Miscellaneous 25 



Medical 

Arthur N. Ball, M. D., Assistant Superintendent since November 2, 1921, 
resigned October 13, 1926 having been appointed to the position of Assistant to 
the Commissioner of the Department of Mental Diseases. His services were 
characterized by his knowledge of psychiatry, a keen interest in the welfare of the 
patients and a close and faithful attention to his duties. 

Milman Pease. M. D., Assistant Physician, since November 24, 1924 resigned 
February 19, 1926 to accept a position with the General Electric Company of Lynn. 

Dr. Cesareo DeAsis appointed to fill this vacancy began his services May 20, 1926. 

Eloise H. Bailey, University of Vermont Medical School, served as Clinical 



P.D. 70 



7 



Assistant during the Summer months. 

Carleton G. Osgood, D. M. D., resigned March 31, 1926 to enter private practice. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M. D., was appointed to this position and took up his 
duties May 11, 1923. 

Two vacancies now exist in the Medical Staff and no suitable applicants are at 
present available. It is difficult to carry on effectively with a reduced Medical 
Staff, neither is it safe. The appointment of a Commission to study salaries and 
classification of positions in the state service was authorized by the last Legis- 
lature. A study has been made and a report submitted w^hich recommends, in 
part, materially higher salaries for members of the Medical Staffs of hospitals. 
This increase cannot be approved or granted too soon if we are to attract medical 
men with proper qualifications so that we may continue to maintain the institution 
on a satisfactory plane of medical service. 



There has been no general shortage of employees through the year. Appointees 
to the majority of the positions are quite permanent, but far too many changes 
occur in perhaps five percent of the positions, notably attendants. This is due to 
the fact that it is necessary to continue to try out new appointees, it being impos- 
sible to determine from references or from previous experience whether as attend- 
ants for the mentally ill they will be satisfactory. The whole number of different 
persons employed has been 108. Fifty percent of all changes occur in the position 
of attendants. In charge positions and those positions requiring training I believe 
higher wages should be paid. It is quite impossible to attract trained nurses to 
these positions at the present wages offered. 

In order to encourage saving among the employees, arrangements have been 
made whereby each week the Treasurer of the Gardner Savings Bank is at the 
office on pay day to receive deposits, making it unnecessary for the employees to 
go three miles to make deposits at the bank. The amount received has been very 
gratifying to the Savings Bank and encouraging to the individual depositor. In 
addition to this, collections are made by the Treasurer for the Christmas and 
Vacation Savings Fund for the First National Bank of Gardner and for the Co- 
operative Bank. Savings have been very gratifying. 



There was appropriated for general maintenance expenses $370,505.45 for 1926. 
We have expended $343,640.30. This is equal to a gross weekly per capita cost of 
$6.44 as compared with $6.82 for 1925. The gross income received for the year 
was $28,351.40. Of this $23,198.13 was received for private and reimbursing 
patients. Reimbursement was received for 78 different persons which number 
includes all from whom any money has been received for maintenance. It will be 
seen that 7 per cent of all patients have been able to reimburse the State in full or in 
part for the cost of their care while 93 per cent have been supported entirely by the 
State. 



An appropriation budget request for general expenses based on the estimated 
number to be cared for in 1927 (1010) resident and 50 in "Family Care" has been 
submitted as follows: 



Employees 



Financial 



Recommendations 



Personal Services 
Religious Instruction 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses 
Food 

Clothing and Materials 
Furnishings and Household Supplies 
Medical and General Care 



$191,775.00 

1,900.00 
4,605.00 
74,345.46 
14,025.00 
20,850.00 
15,575.00 



8 



r.D. 70 



Heat, Light and Power 
Farm 

Garage, Stable and Grounds^ 
Repairs Ordinary- 
Repairs and Renewals 



31,205.00 
28,402.07 
9,501.40 
17,000.00 
11,823.00 



Total 



$423,007.83 



Development 



In response to a request for a definite ten year program of development there 
has been submitted to the Department of Mental Diseases the following list of 
special needs which are apparent at this time with reasons given in brief for each: 

No. 1. A building for intensive treatment for men. 

We have now under construction, to be occupied early in 1927, a building for 
the treatment of women. An identical one for men is needed. An appropriation 
in 1927 would make this available in the mid-Summer of 1928. 

No. 2. A hospital for men to care primarily for physical and surgical conditions. 

At present we have a hospital building one floor of which is occupied by men 
and one floor by women. This was understood to be a temporary arrangement 
when this building was erected. A building practically identical with our present 
hospital should be constructed in 1928 and 1929. While the present building having 
tv/o sexes is operating satisfactorily, there are many reasons why the sexes should 
be separated. 

No. 3. Cottage house for 12 employees of the Semi-disturbed Building now 
under construction needed in 1927. 

No. 4. Cottage house for 12 employees needed in 1928, provided a treatment 
building for men is constructed. 

No. 5. Cottage house for 12 employees needed to house employees necessary 
in the proposed hospital building, 1929. 

No. 6. Additional colonies one each year or one every second year, and each 
to house thirty-five patients and from three to five employees. These are in excess 
of any we now have and will help provide for the annual increase in numbers. It 
is important that development of the colonies should continue coincident with the 
recommended development of the central group as otherwise the colony develop- 
ment will be overshadowed. 

No. 7. Colony Building for 35 patients and 5 employees in 1928. This is to 
replace the present Wachusett Cottage which is rapidly becoming unsuitable for 
housing patients and is beyond repair. 

No. 8. A colony group to replace the Valley house and Valley Annex. 

A group of three buildings is recommended. One building in each year of 1928, 
1929, 1930. This development will permit us to plan and erect one building each 
year and they will at the end of three years replace those at Valley Farm. If these 
buildings provide for one hundred, the additional number to be cared for will be 
sixty and beds for forty will be replacements. 

No. 9. A reception building for 50. 

When available it will provide a building which will allow us to admit here all 
new patients, in order to avoid thrusting of patients directly from their homes into 
a crowded State Hospital atmosphere, and will provide for early treatment. 

The above recommendations concern chiefly patients and employees but along 
with this development must come enlargements in other directions as follows: 

No. 1. Coal trestle and sidetrack to Power House. 

It is recommended that an appropriation be made in 1927 for this that it may be 
ready for use in 1928. All coal since the opening of the institution has been carted 
in wheelbarrows to the Power House. All coal should be delivered at the Power 



P.D. 70 



9 



House. Considerable repairs are demanded, usually each year, by the Boston and 
Maine Railroad. This year repairs cost nearly $1400 which repairs may be sufficient 
for this year and next but not longer. 
No. 2. Sewer Beds. 

A. At the central group the sewer beds constructed in 1904 and 1905 have never 
been enlarged. Additional beds will be necessary in 1929. 

B. New sewage beds at the Westminster Cottage Group. This group for 126 
persons has been discharging sewage into cesspools constructed in clay soil, the 
overflow finding an outlet to ditches and finally seeking the ground level some 
distance below. 

C. Sewer beds or connections with sewer beds of the central group to care for 
the Belcher, Seaver, Fairview, Overlook, Highland, Bellevue and Hillerest 
Cottages. At present it would seem better to consider the construction of new filter 
beds than connecting with the sewer at the central group. 

No. 3. Store house and cold storage building in 1928. 

The present store house erected in 1904 was constructed for rough storage and 
because of its construction cannot be developed into a store house as required at 
the present time in which all supplies should be received and distributed on requi- 
sition. A new location near the Power House is suggested in 1928. 

No. 4. Cow Barn, Hay Storage and Wagon Storage. 

This has previously been recommended and is badly needed to care for additional 
cows distributed in outlying barns, also to provide for the storage of hay, and for 
wagons and tools which are now left out of doors. Recommended for 1928. This 
includes a dairy building for the handling of milk. 

No. 5. Power House. 

A. We have four boilers, horizontal return tubular type. Two of these are 22 
years old and two are 20 years old. It is a question of how soon the pressure will 
be reduced and replacement required. Presumably it will be necessary to replace 
them within the next five years and larger boilers will be required. 

B. Electrical Generating unit. At present, power is purchased. As the Colony 
grows and perhaps even now, it may be cheaper to generate power. The two 
small units originally installed have never been enlarged and can do no more than 
light buildings and cannot furnish power in addition, so that a larger generating 
unit would seem to be indicated in 1929. 

No. 6. Cooking and heater house at piggery and an additional house for 
breeding in 1927. 

No. 7. Cement vegetable cellar for Winter storage of vegetables to be located 
near the Hillerest Farm. 

No. 8. Additional laundry machinery. Part in 1927. Larger equipment as 
numbers increase in 1929. 

No. 9 Water line extension. One half mile 8" pipe in 1930. 

This is chiefly to connect two existing lines at the Westminster Cottages. 

No. 10. Superintendent's House. 1927. 

This is urged by the Trustees and has been urged for years. When provided for, 
the second floor of the Administration Building will be released for employees. 
This will make unnecessary one bungalow (item 11). 

No. 11. Four Bungalows for Married Officers. 

One in 1927, one in 1928, one in 1929, and one in 1930. Recommended for 
Physicians, Treasurer, Head Farmer and Foreman Mechanic. 
No. 12. Occupational Building in 1929. 

As numbers increase the Printery now located in the laundry building should be 
removed as laundry space will be needed for laundry purposes. 

These needs are based upon the probable growth of the Colony to care for 1500 
patients and the necessary employees. A hospital caring for this number is generally 
considered to be of desirable size. 



10 



P.D. 70 



Construction and Repairs 

Four new toilet sections each three stories in height, additions to the Men's 
and Women's Infirmaries, provided for by special appropriations have been 
practicallj^ completed. 

An appropriation was granted in 1926 for an "Intensive Treatment Building" 
to provide for 86 patients. Bids were received, the most favorable one accepted 
and construction commenced August 17th. This building is now closed in and 
will be completed this Winter ready for occupancy in the Spring. This will give 
great relief in the treatment of those who are disturbed and will allow us to use 
the Women's Infirmary for the quiet and innrm as originally intended. 

Changes in the subway to this new building and to the Domestic Building have 
been made, with an entrance into the main kitchen so that food service may be 
provided by truck direct from the main kitchen making unnecessary the operation 
of two small kitchens. 

An appropriation for connecting our water supply with that of the city of Gardner 
was made in 1?23. Difficulty with the contractor was encountered and this work 
has been much delayed, but has been completed this year and water was turned 
on from the Gardner supply in September. This was none too soon as we were at 
that time facing a water shortage. With this connection as an auxiliary to our 
own supply, we are now out of danger in case of fire. A field stone pump house 
has been constructed in connection \\dth this system and connected with the 
pump house has been constructed a machine shop 30'x50'. 

An appropriation granted to the Department of Mental Diseases for further 
protection against fire provided the sum of $4,000 for use at this institution. 
With this we have erected fire escapes on three employees' cottages, have installed 
a sprinkler system in the Assembly Building, Men's and Women's Industrial 
Buildings and the Laundry. Each is equipped with an outside alarm ball. 

The water system has been extended to the Assembly Building; from the Wa- 
ehusett Cottage to the Hillcrest Cottage and from the Hospital Building to the 
Pumping Station. 

The railroad sidetrack 1400 ft. in length has been raised and renewed. It is 
now in repair to last a number of years. 

Repairs of the coal trestle have been made as required by the Boston and Mains 
Railroad. 

Two hand stokers have been installed at the Pov/er House. Ail boilers are 
now equipped with hand stokers. 

The electric line to the hospital has been discontinued and a cable installed in 
the subway. 

Two silos at the barn have been covered with Crainelox covering and a head 
house built upon them. 

A new twenty-five horse power motor has been installed at the saw-mill. This 
will also operate the stone crusher. 

A basement smoking room has been constructed at the Gardner Cottages which 
will provide the fifty men there with a recreation and smoking room. 

Two solaria at the hospital have been enclosed with glass, to keep out Winter 
storms. 

An appropriation of $1000 was granted to assist in the re-construction of the 
highway from Westminster to the Hospital, a distance of two and one half miles. 
The town of Westminster has appropriated $1000 and the Department of Public 
Works has appropriated $2000. The work on this was begun October 4. 

Changes have been made in the business ofiice. The Treasurer's ofiice has been 
moved to the center of the building which provides a better safeguard in handling 
money and more office space has been assigned for the Steward. 

Two rooms on the first floor of the Administration Building have been recon- 
structed for the medical force, the medical stenographers and social service workar 



P.D. 70 



11 



Another room on this floor has been converted into a general library. 

An Acme x-ray equipment has been installed in the hospital building. 

In the kitchen a large hood has been constructed over the ranges and cookers. 

Further work has been done on the vegetable cellar supplying the main kitchen 
and this is now in use. 

The hot water circulating system has been extended to the Hospital 
Building. 

A fire escape has been added at the Hillcrest Cottage. 

The Post Office has been made a sub-station of the Gardner Post Office and all 
mail is now received and dispatched from trains at East Gardner. 

At the Printery extensive changes have been made by enclosing three rooms 
with glass and arranging a press room, a binding room, and an assembling and 
stock room. An additional automatic press has been installed and a large power 
paper cutter. Much printing has been done in this Department and more can 
now be handled with the additional space and equipment. 

Farm and Grounds 

The farm is one of the most important branches of the work of the Colony. 
From the farm we receive all vegetables that are consumed, our milk, poultry, 
firewood and a large amount of lumber each year. In addition, it provides one of 
the best methods of occupying the patients. It, therefore, has received careful 
attention and study and great effort has been expended upon it. 

Prevalence of disease in farm crops and farm animals seems to be always upon 
the increase and requires more and more thought and time to reduce and eradicate. 
Certainly one cannot operate a farm today unless they are as well prepared to 
fight disease as they are to propagate crops. 

Returns from the farm have be^ satisfactory, our largest crops being potatoes, 
4,896 bu., turnips, 45,157 lbs., onions, 29,345 lbs.; dry beans, 4,510 lbs.; carrots, 
68,758 lbs.; together with sufficient amount of other Winter vegetables to carry 
us thru the year. In addition to Winter vegetables, we have been bountifully 
supplied with green crops thru the Summer and Fall. We are not able to raise all 
the hay consumed but each year sees progress in this direction. This year we 
produced 216 tons of hay, 209 tons of green feed, 300 tons of ensilage corn. 

The presence of the European corn borer in Massachusetts retards intensive 
farm operation as all corn stubble has to be plowed under each Fall. 

Returns from the dairy have been encouraging. The milk production per cow for 
the year was 12,0243^ lbs. We have experienced difficulty with the prevalence 
of contagious abortion but this seems now to have been eliminated. Although 
starting with a herd infected with Tuberculosis, we have succeeded in eradicating 
this and now all cov/s test free from Tuberculosis. 

At the Poultry Plant day eld chicks were purchased instead of incubating eggs. 
From this department we have received 3,188 lbs. of dressed poultry and 3,140 
doz. eggs. 

The pork production for the year was 24,198 lbs. 

The operation of the cannery has been successful as will be seen by the ac- 
companying table. All surplus fruits and vegetables are canned for Winter use. 

We do not have artificial refrigeration and depend upon ice. This year 1,740 
tons of ice were harvested. 

From the woodland we have cut 545 cords of firewood and cleared 55 3^ acres of 
underbrush and converted 33^ acres into farm land. We have cut and sawed 
98,819 ft. of lumber divided as follows: Native Pine 66,410 ft.,_ Chestnut 1000 ft., 
Maple and Oak 1000 ft., Hemlock 20,409 ft.. Spruce 10,000 ft. This lumber is 
prepared in our portable mill andis used for miscellaneous repairs. Fourteen 
acres have been re-forested with 9,759 Norway Spruce 5-yr. old, 6,000 Japanese 
White Pine, 625 Japanese Red Pine 4-yr. old, and 25 White Pine 3-yr. old. 



12 P.D. 70 

The work of farm and grounds is closely related. We have removed from fields 
736 tons of stone; excavated 845 tons of rock much of which required drilling and 
blasting, have excavated 1,780 cu yds., of earth: have re-built 2,269 sq. yds. of 
road. In addition to work upon roads at the Colony, there has been 1,400 ft. of 
road, 80 ft. wide, excavated and filled at an average depth of 16 inches of stone in 
the work upon the highway between the Colony and Westminster. 

Recreation and Diversion 

Motion pictures continue to be the most satisfactory form of entertainment 
and have been held weekly through the winter months. Dances have been held at 
intervals with music usually by the orchestra or band of the Colony. 

On holidays parties have been arranged, especially on Hallowe'en, Fourth of July, 
Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years. 

The Annual Field Day was held September 15 with an all day out-door program. 

The merry-go-round has been much enjoyed by the patients. 

A radiola and large power speaker has been installed in the Assembly Building 
which provides music especially during motion pictures. The radio formerly used 
in this building, presented to us by the Rotary Club, has been installed in the 
hospital building with a loud speaker on each floor. 

Religious services have received special stimulation with a special program 
arranged for Easter and Christmas. A vested choir provides suitable music for 
each Sunday service. 

Throughout the year and particularly at Christmas time we do all that is possible 
to urge a greater interest on the part of relatives of patients, A card is sent to 
every known relative before Christmas urging that patients be remembered with 
presents for the Christmas tree. 1,095 such cards were sent out this year and we 
note with regret that only 514 received presents from home. The State supplied 
presents to 503, practically 50%. This is disappointing. Relatives should take 
a greater interest in members of their family who are mentally ill. 

Acknowledgment 

Acknowledgment is due and extended with fullest appreciation to the following: 
For magazine subscriptions from Mrs. Araie H. Coes, 1058 Main St., Worcester; 
magazines received from Dr. P. J. Grant, Parker St., Gardner; Roy Mayo, Gardner; 
Levi Heywood Gardner, Heyw^ood Memorial Hospital, Gardner; Dr. Alice Walker, 
Gardner, Heywood Memorial Library, Gardner; Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Boston; Frances I. Danforth, 107 Chestnut St., Gardner; Mrs. C. P. Pearson, 
Elm St., Gardner; Mrs. Fred Bancroft, Edgell St., Gardner; Mrs. H. Smith, 120 
Graham St., Gardner; Owen A. Hoban, Park St., Gardner; Mrs. George Keyworth, 
Cross St., Gardner; Mrs. Paul Cody, Lawrence St., Gardner; Mrs. E. E. Gage, 
Gardner; Mrs. H. N. Brooks, 21 Cross St., Gardner; Mrs. Chas. Dewey, 30 Cross 
St., Gardner; Henry Howe, 27 Green St., Gardner; Mrs. Ethel Hall, Pearl St., 
Gardner. Christian Science literature from the Distributing Committee, 30 
Main St., Leominster and from Miss Barbara Keith, 53 Lincoln St., Gardner; 
Jewish bread and fruit, Rev. Moses L. Sedar; box of silk and other occupational 
material, Mrs. S. W. Gerald, 7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain; library books, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; 27 copies of sheet music, Emery's Music 
Store, Gardner; Candy, Caroline D. Harlow, 11 Pleasant St., Marblehead; Candy 
M. E. Daly, 89 West Brookline St., Boston; Entertainment given by the Square 
and Compass Club of Fitchburg; Christmas stockings, from D. V. C. R. C, 376 
Boylston St., magazines from Mrs. S. A. Eastman, Beach Bluff. 

In closing this report for the year which I feel has been one of progress, I take 
this opportunity to thank the Board Members for their unfailing interest in the 
work and for their constant and continued encouragement and support. 

To all officers and employees I wish to express my fullest appreciation of their 
loyalty and for that spirit of cooperation without which a satisfactory standard 
of care would be impossible. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, Superintendent. 



P.D. 70 



13 



Products of Farm 1926 



Milk, whole 


695,526.4 


lbs. 


m 


.0465 


$32,341 . 


98 


Eggs 


2,1512-12 


doz. 


@ 


.75 


1,613. 


37 


Eggs 


989 


doz. 


@ 


.45 


445. 


05 


Asparagus 


1451^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.14 


20, 


37 


Beans, dry- 


7,510 


lbs. 


@ 


.06 


450. 


60 


Beans, shell 


1,369 


lbs. 


@ 


.05 


68. 


45 


Beans, string 


13,159 H 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


921. 


17 


Beets, table 


38,573 


lbs. 


@ 


.0125 


482. 


16 


Beet greens 


3,5551^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.04 


142. 


22 


Cabbage 


22,7793^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.0075 


170. 


85 


Carrots, table 


68,758 1^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.0225 


1,547. 


06 


Cauliflower 


42 


lbs. 


@ 


.04 


1. 


68 


Celery- 


1,627 


lbs. 


@ 


.045 


73. 


22 


Chard, Swiss 


22,904 


lbs. 


@ 


.03 


687. 


12 


Corn 


23,5593^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.025 


588. 


99 


Cucumbers 


6,693 34 


lbs. 


@ 


.03 


200. 


81 


Dandelions 


40 


lbs. 


@ 


.08 


3. 


20 


Lettuce 


1,945 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


38. 


90 


Mangles 


15,435 


lbs. 


@ 


.00325 


50. 


16 


Onions 


29,3451^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.035 


1,027. 


09 


Parsley 


2 


lbs. 


@ 


.0425 




.08 


Parsnips 


6,0941^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.03 


182. 


84 


Peas 


5,382 


lbs. 


@ 


.09 


484. 


38 


Potatoes 


287,113 


lbs. 


@ 


.0175 


5,024. 


47 


Potatoes, early 


6,685H 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


133. 


71 


Pumpkin 


2,6511^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.01 


26. 


,51 


Radishes 


157 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


3 


.14 


Rhubarb 


2,312 


lbs. 


@ 


.01 


23 


.12 


Scullions 


2,504 M 


lbs. 


% 


.015 


37 


.57 


Spinach 


1,995 


lbs. 


@ 


.05 


99 


.75 


Squash, summer 


5,699 H 


lbs. 


@ 


.015 


85 


.49 


Squash, winter 


11,318 


lbs. 


@ 


.0225 


254 


.66 


Tomatoes 




IDS. 




. 


480 


.36 


Turnips, table 


45,157M 


lbs. 


@ 


.0125 


564 


.46 


Turnips, stock 


2,685 


lbs. 


@ 


.00325 


8 


.72 


Turnip greens 


1,445 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


28 


.90 


Apples, No. 1 


13,162 


lbs. 


@ 


.025 


329 


.05 


Apples, No. 2 


10,079 


lbs. 


@ 


.0175 


176 


.38 


Apples, cider 


9,206 


lbs. 


@ 


.005 


46 


.03 


Blackberries 


547 M 


lbs. 


% 


.24 


131 


.46 


Blueberries 


8,855 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


619 


.85 


Cherries 


42 


lbs. 


@ 


.10 


4 


.20 


Currants 


48 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


3 


.36 


Gooseberries 


75 


lbs. 


@> 


.07 


5 


.25 


Grapes 


137 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


9 


.59 


Peaches 


54 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


1 


.08 


Pears 


1/0 


lbs. 






3 


.06 


Plums 


216 


lbs. 


@ 


.03 


6 


.48 


Raspberries 


507 


lbs. 


@ 


.30 


152 


.18 


Strawberries 


1,950 


lbs. 


@ 


..16 


312 


.00 


Beef 


5,708 


lbs. 


@ 


.13 


742 


.04 


Veal 


1,560 


lbs. 


@ 


.22 


343 


.20 



14 










P.D. 


70 


Pork 


24,198H 


lbs. 


@ 


. 15 


3,629 


. 78 


Rabbit 


49 


lbs. 


@ 


.40 


19 


. 60 


Chicken 


1,187^4 


lbs. 


@ 


.40 


475 


. 10 


Fowl 


1,050 >^ 


lbs. 


@ 


.36 


378 


.05 


Broilers 


950M 


lbs. 


@ 


.43 


408 


61 


Turkey- 


246 M 


lbs. 


@ 


.43 


105 


.89 


Hay, No. 1 


215.7 


tons 


@^ 


^22 . 00 


$4,745 


40 


Hay, meadow 


10.8 


tons 


@ 


14.00 


151 


.20 


Clover, green 


29. 5 


tons 


@ 


7.00 


206 


. 50 


Ensilage corn 


230 


tons 


@ 


6 . 00 


1,380 


. 00 


Field corn ensilage 


70 


tons 


@ 


7.00 


490 


.00 


Oats 


14,006 


lbs. 


@ 


.02 


280 


. 12 


Oat straw 


8 


tons 


@ 


12.00 


96 


. 00 


Oat green feed 


156 


tons 


@ 


6.50 


1,014, 


.00 


Alfalfa, green 


20.04 


tons 


7.00 


142 


.80 


Hides 


425 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


29 


75 


Hides 


489 


lbs. 


@ 


.09948 


48 . 


C K 

DD 


Liver 


870 M 


lbs. 


@ 


.07 


60. 


95 


Manure 


1,139.16 


tons 


@ 


2.50 


2,847. 


.90 


Lumber, native pine 


66,410 


ft. 


@ 


.07 


4,648 


. (0 


Lumber, chestnut 


1,000 


ft. 


@ 


.07 


70 . 


. 00 


Lumber, maple and oak 


1,000 


ft. 


@ 


.07 


70 . 


00 


Lumber, hemlock 


20,409 


ft. 


@ 


.065 


1,326. 


59 


Lumber, spruce 


10,000 


ft. 


@' 


.065 


650. 


00 


Fence stakes 


450 




@ 


.05 


22. 


50 


Fence posts 


100 




@ 


.025 


25, 


.00 


Wood 


545 


cords 


@ 


10.00 


5,450 . 


00 


Sawdust 


40 


cords 


@ 


1.00 


40. 


00 


Ice 


1,450 


tons 


@ 


5.50 


9,570. 


00 


Grand Total 










$89,580. 


91 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

Work done by Women 
Altar cloth, 1; Aprons, various, 1067; Bags, various, 396; Baskets, various, 48; 
Beads, wax, 3 strings; Belts, sanitary 1; Binders, abdominal, 36; Birds, crepe 
paper, 6; Blankets, patients, 122; Blankets, pack, 74; Bloomers, 2 pair; Blotters, 
7; Buffet sets, 10; Burlap, dyed 400 lbs; Caps, various, 535; Centerpieces, various, 
75; Chemises, 381; Coats, 3; Coat hangers, 1; Collars, embroidered, 1; Combination 
sets, 2; Covers, bureau, 24; Covers, buffet, 12; Covers, table, 169; Covers, tub, 4; 
Cover, pool table, 1; Cover, corset, 23; Cover, couch, 4; Crowns, 2; Curtains, 
various, 175; Curtain ties, 100; Curtain valances, 65; Curtain cords, 102; Cushions, 
26; Dish mop, crepe paper, 3; Doilies stamped, 100; Doilies, various, 158; Dolls, 14; 
Drawers, cotton, 447 pr;. Drawers, under, men's, 491 pr; Drawers, under, women's, 
100; Dresses, various, 863; Flowers, ribbon, 13; Flowers, crepe paper, 4008; Gloves, 
men's, knitted, 2 pr; Gloves, women's, knitted, 2 pr; Hammocks, tub, 5; Handker- 
chiefs, tatted edge, 4; Handkerchiefs, men's, 849; Handkerchiefs, women's, 232; 
Hats, 18; Holders, kitchen, 198; Insertion, crochet, 10 yds; Jumpers, 321; Lace, 



P.D. 70 



15 



various, 451 3^ yds; Lamp shades, crepe paper, 7; Lamp shade panels, 4; Lamps, 
3; Leggins, surgical, 6; Luncheon sets, various, 7; Madallions, tatted, 1; Mats, 
various, 25; Material, plain woven, 65 yds: Material fancy woven, 75 yds; Mattress, 
ticks, 176; Mattress, couch, 1; Mittens, 156 pr; Napkins, various, 39; Overalls, 
321 pr; Panels, door, 6; Paper, dyed, 12 lbs.; Patterns, perforated, 30; Pennants, 
1; Pendants, wax, 4; Petticoats, 252; Pictures, hand painted, 22; Pillows, various 
58; Pillow ticks, 202; Pillow slips; 2858; Portieres, dyed, 6; Quilts, patch work, 11; 
Quilts, tufted, 8; Rags, dyed, 2626 lbs; Reefers, 1; Roses, telphone novelties, 4; 
Rugs, various 473; Rugs, stamped, 87; Rugs, bound, 87; Rugs, designed, 87; 
Runners, various 53; Scarfs, dyed, 20; Scarfs, knitted, 20; Shawls, fireman, 4; 
Shawls, crocheted, 2; Sheets, surgical, 6; Sheets, pack, 77; Sheets, double and 
single, 876; Shirts, 100; Shirts, hospital, 143; Shoetops, stitched, 642; pr. Slipper 
tops, stitched, 240 pr; Spreads, 37; Spool rope, knitted, 8465 yds; Spool rope, dyed, 
8465 yds; Stockings toed, 6875 pr; Suit, child's 1; Sweaters, knitted, 31; Sweaters, 
dyed, 31; Tatting, 287 yds; Ties, 505; Trays, reed., 8; Trousers, wool, 1026 pr; 
Towels, various, 5892; Vases, reed, 5; Vanity sets, 4; Vests, under, 649; Warp, 
dyed, 45 lbs; Wool, dyed, 60 lbs.; Yarn, dyed, 25 lbs.; Yokes, crocheted, 2. 

Mending done by Women 
Aprons, various, 848; Bags, 205; Bath robes, 61; Bedspreads, 25; Bibs, 37; 
Blankets, 218; Bloomers, 18; Caps, 24; Chemises, 526; Coats, 939; Collars, 2; 
Corsets, 22; Corset covers, 71; Curtains, 11 pr.; Dish cloths, 58; Drawers, 996; 
Dresses, 1641; Dress skirts, 13; Flags, 122; Gloves, 3 pr.; Hats, trimmed, 15; Holders 
74; Jumpers, 2329; Loom cover, 1; Mittens, 24 pr.; Napkins, 16; Night caps, 7; 
Nightgowns, 1665; Overalls, 1748; pr. Petticoats, 1405; Reefers, 35; Rugs, 153; 
Shawls, 5; Sheets, 1329; shirts, 2596; Slippers, 10 pr.; Stockings, men's 9896 pr.; 
Stockings, women's 2987 pr; Sweaters, 114; Tags, sewed on clothing, 1380; Table 
cloths, 19; Table covers, 9; Trousers, 1417 pr.; Towels 217; Tub covers, 9; Tub 
hammocks, 2; Under drawers, men's 1676 pr.; Under drawers, women's 117 pr.; 
Under shirts, men's, 1891; Under vests, womens', 464; Union suits, men's, 307; 
Union suits, women's 182; Vests, 130; Waists, 6. 

Work done by Men 
Textile Department 

Bedspread material, 454 yds.; Blanket material, 592 M yds.; Brooms, various, 
600; Brushes, various, 987; Cocoa mats, 2; Khaki Cloth, 19013^ yds.; Mattresses, 
304; Mattress tufts, 14800; Mattresses, remade, 99; Mitten wristlets, 1603; Overall 
Material, 1912 yds.; Pillows, 126; Pillows, remade, 45; Sheeting, 3304 M yds.; 
Shirting, 573 K yds.; Socks, men's, 3936 pr.; Special cloth, 31 yds.;> Stockings, 
women's, 1747 pr.; Ticking, 767 yds.; Toweling, 3318 yds.; Underwear material, 
24663^ yds.; Underv/ear wristlets, material, 1253 yds.; 

Furniture Department 

New Work. Bobbins, 3; Boxes, index, 2; Boxes, film, 1; Bulletin boards, 3; 
Chairs, 11; Desks, 6; Frames, various, 6; Ink stands, 7; Screens, 1; Settees, 7; 
Shades, 252; Stools, 12; Wooden horses, 6. 

Repair Work. Benches and couches, 5; Chairs, 625; Chamber set, 1; Chiffoniers, 
3; Clippers, 1; Clocks, 22; Curtain rods and fixtures, 22; Desks, 7; Dressers, 3; 
Frames, 1; Graphophones, 7; Hinges put on, 8; Knives, sharpened, 13; Looms, 5; 
Mirrors, 6; Pedestal, 1; Rods, and brackets 31; Scissors, 86 pr.; Screen, 1; Sewing 
machines, 14; Settees, 59; Shades, 62; Spool rack, 1; Springs, put in, 1; Stools, 1; 
Swabs, 21; Tables, 34; Victrolas, 3; Wheelbarrow, 1. 

Tailoring Departmerii 
Blankets repaired, 11; Caps, cut, 488; Caps, pressed, 488; Chemises cut, 269; 
Clothing, repaired, 5167 pieces; Coats, made, 625; Dresses cut, 585; Jumpers and 



16 



P.D. 70 



overalls, 376; Nightgowns, cut, 231; Night shirts, cut, 266; Shirts, outside, 212? 
Shirts, hospital, 163; Trousers, cut, 787; Trousers, cut and made, 136; Trousers* 
pressed, 771; Underwear, women's, cut, 681; Underwear, men's, 932; Vests, cut, 
95; Vests, cut and made, 34; Vests, pressed, 49. 

Shoe Department 

Auto repairs, miscellaneous; Bags, repaired, 7; Belt, repaired, 1; Blankets, re- 
paired, 4; Blotter holder, made, 1; Braces, knee, 1; Brogans, made, 251 pr.; Clock 
case, repaired, 1; Collars, horse, repaired, 6; Crupper, repaired, 1; Girths, repaired, 
3; Halters, repaired, 25; Hames and traces, repaired, 4; Harnesses, repaired, 17; 
Harness straps, repaired, 1; Mandolin case, repaired, 1; Mittens, leather, made, 
736; Putees, repaired, 1 pr.; Pole straps and martingales, repaired, 14; Reins, re- 
paired, 9; Rubber heels, put on, 224 pr.; Saddle, repaired, 1; Shoes, women's, 
cloth, made, 18 pr.; Shoes, women's dress, made, 256 pr.; Shoes, men's dress, 291 
pr.; Shoes, repaired, 2098 pr.; Slippers, men's, made, 229 pr.; Straps, harness, 
repaired, 13. 

Canning List for 1926 

Beans, shell, 166 qts; Beans, string, 5939 qts; Beets, 83 qts; Beets, pickled, 28 
qts.; Beet greens, 10 qts.; Blackberries, 227 qts.; Blueberries, 5960 qts.; Carrots, 
5 qts.; Carrots, pickled, 1 qt.; Chard, 3119 qts.; Chard, 2 bbls.; Cherries, 83^ qts.; 
Cherry conserve, 2 glasses; Chopped pickle, 87 qts.; Chow Chow, 83 qts.; Corn, 
sweet, 14453^ qts.; Cucumber pickle, 267 qts.; Cucumber pickle, 12 bush.; Cucumber 
pickle, 2 bbls.; Sweet cucumber pickle, 993^ qts.; Dandelion greens, 133^ qts.; 
Goosberries, 183^ qts.; Grape juice, 8 pts.; Jelly, 536 glasses,; Jam, 105 glasses; 
Jam, 113^ qts.; Marmalade, 8 glasses; Mincemeat, 383^ qts.; Mustard pickle, 56 
qts.; Peaches, 24 qts.; Pears, 443^ qts.; Peas, 273 qts.; Plums, 58 qts.; Piccalilli, 
320 qts.; Pumpkin, 45 qts.; Raspberries, 1503^ qts.; Rhubarb, 131 qts.; Sauerkraat 
1 bbl.; Squash, 93 qts.; Strawberries, 321 M qts.; Tomatoes, 81493^ qts.; Green 
tomatoe preserve, 3 qts.; Tomato pickle, 517 qts.; Tomato pickle, 1 bbl.; Sweet 
tomato pickle, 4 qts.; 

Canned at the Cannery (included in the above} 

Beans, shell, 27 gals.; Beans, string, 1379 gals.; Blackberries, 28 gals.; Blue- 
berries, 1186 gals.; Corn, sweet, 2535 pints; Swiss chard, 687 gals.; Tomatoes,1992 
gals. 

VALUATION 

November 30, 1926 



Real Estate 

Land, 1848 acres $36,950.00 

Buildings 909,267 . 54 



$946,217.54 

Personal Property 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses $275 . 00 

Food 10,317.37 

Clothing and Materials 19,265 . 51 

Furnishings and Household Supplies 138,500.95 

Medical and General Care 4,525.31 

Heat, Light and Power 2,333 93 

Farm 46,955.40 

Garage, Stables and Grounds 18,466 . 10 

Repairs 14,694 . 98 



$255,334.55 

Sl^mmary 

Real Estate $946,217 . 54 

Personal Property 255,334 . 55 



$1,201,552.09 



P.D. 70 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



17 



To the Department of Mental Diseases; 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1926: 



Cash Account 
Receipts 

Income 

Board of Patients : — $23,198 . 13 

$23,198 . 13 

Personal Services: — 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 107 . 65 

Sales: — 

Food $2,029.99 

Clothing and Materials 323 . 10 

Furnishings and Household Supplies (Keys) 1 . 00 

Com. on Tel. Calls 21 . 89 

Farm : — 

Cows and calves $30 . 14 

Pigs and hogs 57 . 00 

Hides 81.20 

Broilers 3.44 

171.78 

Junk and old barrels 206 . 87 

Arts and Crafts sales 966 . 11 

^ Total Sales ^$3,720. 74 

Miscellaneous: — 

Interest on bank balances $822.67 

Rent 502.21 

$1,324.88 

Total, Income $28,351.40 



Maintenance 



Balance from previous year, brought forward $10,563.95 

Appropriations, current year 359,941 . 50 

Total $370,505.45 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 343,639 . 84 

Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth $26,865 . 61 



Analysis of Expenses 

Personal Services $166,337.12 

Religious Instruction 1,395 . 00 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses 3,797.83 

Food 54,864.91 

Clothing and Materials 12,649 . 62 

P\irnishings and Household Supplies 17,248.59 

Medical and General Care 14,272.04 

Heat, Light and Power 19,415 . 96 

Farm 27,981.60 

Garage, Stable and Grounds 4,388 . 28 

Repairs, Ordinary 13,219.05 

Repairs and Renewals 8,069 . 84 

Total expenses for Maintenance $343,639.84 

Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1, 1925 40,293.43 

Appropriations for ciurrent year 87,700.00 

Total 127,993.43 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $71,740.95 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 10.49 

$71,751 . 44 

Balance November 30, 1926 carried to next year $56,241.99 



18 



P.D. 70 



Object 


Act or 

Resolve 


i 

Amount j p^eal Year 


Total 
Expended 
to Date 


Balance 
at End 
Of Year 


Fairview Cottage 

Garage and Fire Stations. 
Additional Water Supply . 

Add'i. Fire Protection . . . 
Alterations in Infimari^. 

Fire Protection 1925 

Coal Trestle 

Purchase of Land 

Food Conveyors 

Bldg. for Semi-Dis. Pts. . 
Highway repairs in West. 


Chau. 126, Acts 1924 
Chab. 126, Acts 1924 
Chab. 126, Acts 1924 
Chai?. 398, Acts 1926 
Chap. 510. Acts 1924 
Chap. 126, Acts 1923 
Chap. 347, Acts 1925 
ChaD. 79, Acts 1926 
Chap. 79. Acts 1926 
Chap. 79, Acts 1926 
Chap. 79, Acts 1926 
Chap. 398, Acts 1926 


$9,000.00 

6,000.00 
42,000.00 

2,500.00 
12,000.00 

4,000.00 

1,500.00 
400.00 

2,800.00 
75,000.00 

1,000.00 


$165.30 
255.60 
24,515.01 

191.24 
9,785.77 
2,841.28 
1,383.33 

32,519.09 
84.33 


$8,997.87 
5,991.79 
35,844.21 

2.499.85 
9,785.77 
2,841.28 
1,383.33 

32,519.09 
84.33 


2.13* 
8.21* 
6,155.79 

.15* 
2,214.23 
1,158.72 
116.67 
400.00 
2,800.00 
42.480.91 
915.67 


$156,200.00 


571,740.95 


$99,947.52 


$56,252.48 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item ^ith *) 10 .49 

Balance carried to next year 56,241 . 99 

Per Capita 

During the vear the average number of inmates has been: At Hospital, 982.06; Familv Care, 43.84: Total, 
1025.90 

Total cost for maintenance, S343,639.S4 

Equal to a weekly per capital cost of S6.44 (52 weeks to year) 

Receipt from sales, S3 720.74 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.07 

All other institution receipts, 824,630 . 66 

Eaual to a weekly per capita of S.46 

Net weekly per capita $5.91 

Respectfullv submitted, 

GERTRUDE W. PERRY. Treasurer. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



A.^ Adopted by the American P.-ychiatric A.s.soci.\tion" 



PRE.^CRIBED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 



Table 1. — General Information 

Data correct at end of institution year, November 30, 1926 
1. Date of opening as an institution for the insane: October 22, 1902. 



2. Type of institution: State. 

3. Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property 

Real estate including buildings $946,217.54 

Personal property 255,334.55 



Total $1,201,552 09 



Total acreage of hospital property owned, 1,848.5 
Additional acreage rented: None. 
4. Officers and Employees: 

Actually in Service Vacancies at end 
AT End of Year of Year 





M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Superintendents 


1 




1 








Assistant physicians 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 










1 




1 




3 




3 


2 


1 


3 




1 




1 










1 




1 












2 


2 










49 


3S 


87 


2 


2 


4 




5 


4 


9 




1 


1 




45 








1 


1 






42 


87 


5 


3 


8 




107 


86 


190 


9 


8 


17 



P.D. 70 

5. Census of patieot population at end of year: 



Actually in 
Instititios 



19 



Absent hrom 
Institution Btrr 

STILL ON BOOKS 





-\1 


p 


T. 


M. 


P. T. 


White 














490 


337 


827 


35 


74 109 




—58 


44 


102 


2 


1 3 


Alcoholics 


55 


13 


68 


2 


2 


Total . . 




394 


997 


39 


75 114 


Colored 














3 




10 


— 


1 1 


Mental defectives 


2 


1 


3 


- 




Total 




8 


13 




1 1 


Grand Total 


608 


402 


1010 


39 


76 115 








M. 


F. 


T. 


Paitents employed in industrial dasses or in general hospital work 














511 


309 


820 


Average daily number of all patients actually in institution during 








year 






584.439 


390 968 


975.407 


Voluntary pati^ts admitted during year 






4 


1 


5 


Persons given advice or treatment m out-patient dmics durmg year . . 


23 


29 


52 



Table 2. — Financial Staiemeni 
See Treasurer's Report for data requested under this table. 



20 



P.O. 70 



i 

CO 



o 

•<s> 

§• 



1-1 tC 05 U3 N t- 00 I— O 30 O -t f-i 1> >-i O M N -"a" la ri* 00 .-i W 

Ti< ooi-toooxNO — — — . o .... ^ \a 

O rH <-<N i-ir-i OiOOiT* O 

i-l ri r-i <Dt-'S<-^ r-( 

oa> 

_____ 
la ;r>ooci 

•I O»00Cit-00CiU;<DC>>?0l00lt-<-i C-CSOOriO (M C". 
1" TJ< <N C- "1 1-1 N -"tC- .... O CJ 

ia -<t i-io«t- Tj< 

»fl Oi 1-1 

05 o o ■ 

CO »H t>(» O O CJ N 00 CO rH 0> 1-1 «0 t- ^ -<a< N 00 « N 05 « 
O T-IIC lO I-l i-t M t-l W-*!" .... ri O CO 



>" 

a 

•< 

H 

z 
o 

> 




1 ■<ti-'U5|u5»o-<9i|ll-<s<lll-«ri-i iiilli 1 1 




1 r10r-llr1i-lr-(|||i-l|l|i-l| lllll l 1 1 


Sane 




1 S0'-l-*l'>4<-^«IIIO5lllC0rH llllll 1 1 


Temporary Care 

AND 

Observation 




IN <ON001000t-'-<rHiX>Oli-t»-<OrH iillll 1 1 




1 ;00» 1 50C0«0 1 1 rHU3 1 1 1 1 llllll 1 1 


% 


OJ OCJN 1 ^ rH rH rH U5 rf 1 rH rH C2 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 






C-t-NOC 

eo o OS CO 

Oi ;0ONN-=!"0O30t-TfrHi-(C0lt>SD N->*CJ"3'*00 rH C^J 
m <X> rH 00 00 CD O CO rn lO QO ^'.ftrrs'-^' ?^ 


Insane 




coooc-oc 

iO;£)00OJ 

^ SOOOrHO>OrH(NlO»rHO 100 1 O -H t- OS O «0 rH «5 Ol 
Tl-eO-^INt-rHrH "^"^E:-.'^',/^!^ 2^ 
^ lOOi^rH 

'd'co 






~ t3< O O 

00 edOOr^(»'*<MQO«'-^«'-<^S ' '^'^Nooeoej g eo 

« ,-100 <N 



Is 

I 4J O 



o o Si;-- g 



^ to 



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c s 

^ C« S M 



B ^ 



S > 0) o 

D3 



73 

na > c S 

0) o C3 

!> CQ a> 

a.S 

►5^:2; Eh 



o o'^ 



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H.S^I|1||^>. coo 
>.>,>>>>c §..2 •> I 

& S3 S SJ §3 a;5 ».£ 

^ii^ HISS'S 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 4 — Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions for the 
Year ending September 30, 1926 



Xativity 


Patients 




! Parents of m.\le patients , 

1 1 


Parents of Fem.\le 
Patients 




Males 


Females 


Total 


1 Fathers 


Mothers 


Both 1 
Parents | 


Fathers 


Mothers 


Both 
Parents 


United States . . 


21 
3 


24 
6 


45 

9 


13 
4 


11 

5 


24 ! 
9 ! 


13 

8 


11 
9 


24 
17 


England 












- 1 


1 


- 


1 


♦Europe 


1 




1 


1 


1 






- 




Finland 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


! i 


1 


1 


2 


Germany 










- 




1 




1 


Ireland 


1 




1 


3 


4 




4 


6 


10 


Italy 


1 




1 


2 


2 










Poland 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


i 1 


2 


o 


4 


Scotland 


1 




1 


2 


1 


^ 1 










1 




1 


1 


1 


2 1 








Wales 












1 




1 


1 


Unascertained. . 


1 




1 


2 


3 




3 


3 


6 


Total 


33 


33 


66 


33 


33 


66 1 


33 


33 


66 






! 





Total 


d (35 0> Cn cnrfi. CO CO to ^^ h- r-t 

^ o c;iO CTO cno cnOCTO cn^ 
55 0505i^W(kJ>^cocot!oN)h-'£' 


Age Groups 


w 


1 05 ^^^^l^2co*^l-'| co^^rf^*^l 




> 
TO 






w 

CO 


lo c;^^^l^-'05cnl■o^a^^l^-'| 




TO 

a> 

TO 






a> 


1 05 -a (P. t5 ifi- o 05 ^^ cn (t^ *>■ c;t i 




ate 






^^ 


ICS |_4|_1|_i|>0i-1|-i|M|C«C;t*«. 












1 oi COM I 1 c;^03^^^-'^^ i i 












1 ^5 <t>. tci h-i M 05 ^9 to ^5 CO *^ 01 


1 ^ 










1 pf^ II ^-'^5 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 












1 00 to 1 1 1 H-'l-'l-' 1 1 1 




rati\ 








1 ^^ 1 l-'^Dl-'^5^-' i h-' i i 












II 1 I-* 1 1 1 1 1 I-' 1 cot-» 1 






Par 






II 1 t 1 1 05 1 h-'l-'l-' 1 1 1 




orei; 


ENT. 


< 


to 


II 1 M 1 1 CO 1 i-i ^^ (-1 05 1 




3 


n 

B 


td 
o 

fo 


^5 


1 - 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 . 1 




Mixe 








\ to H-l 1 1 1 K->t-' 1 1 1 1 1 1 








-5 


1 CO ^s 1 1 1 i-it-i 1 1 1 1 1 1 




a- 






^^ 


1 I-- 1 1 1 1 I-* 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 










CO 


li-* li-'iiii-'iiiiii 




aine 






o\ 


1 ^^ 1 I-" 1 1 H-h- 1 1 1 1 1 1 










to 


1 1 i-i^i-iH'Oo 1 1 i i 








— 




1 H-i 1 i t-« i i i i 


!^ 








^^ 


) tatst-^to^to 1 co^^^-l i i 










. 1 1 , 1 . < 1 . . I . . . . 1 1 ^ 


(D & 


1 Time 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ."^ 




1 { 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1^ 


3 












5-9 
Year 


cj 




III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


M 
D 


Fo: 




II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t-' 1 1 1 






73 
H 
> 


REIG 




II 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 f I 1 






H 

a 

C/l 


w 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 1 1^ 


^? 


BEFORE 


o 




II 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 t-" 1 1 








11 H-K-ijMtDiltOllll 




p ^ 


> 

O 

S 




OS 


II to \ i 1 1 i 1 1 1 




O (0 

< pj 


ISS] 




CO 


1 1 coH- 1 ^oo5^5 1 ^5 1 1 1 1 




>-« tn 


[ON 




^5 


II 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 l-- 1 1 1 










05 


li-' lt-*lillli-»iiii 










ai 


1 1 t-'H' 1 1 1 1 h-H-' 1 1 1 


H 


& ro 
1 








11 1 1 1 1 I-- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


IF 






1 


II 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 
11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




itivity 

iscer- 

ined 


tivity 





TO 



P.D. 70 23 

Table 5 — Citizenship of First Admissio^ris for (he Year ending Spetember 30, 1926 





M. 


F. 


T. 


Citizens by birth 


21 


24 


45 


Citizens by naturaKzataon 


5 


2 


7 


Aliens '. 


6 


7 


13 


Citizenship unascertained 


1 





1 


Total 


33 


33 


66 







Table 6 — Pspchoses of First Admissions for the Year ending S^vfemher 30, 1926 



Psychoses 



13. 



Traumatic psychoses 

Senile psychoses 

Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosds 

General paralysis 

Psychoses with cerebral sj-philis 

Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 

Psychoses with brain tumor 

Psychoses with other brain or nervous disejises, total,* . . 

Alcoholic psychoses, total 

Delirium tremens 

Korsakow's psychosis 

Acute hallucinosis 

Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 

Psychoses with pellagra 

Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 

Delirium with infectious diseases 

Exhaixstion delirium 

Cardio-renal d seases 

Other diseases 'or conditions 

Manic-depressive psychoses, total 

Manic type 

Depressive type 

Other types 

Involution melancholia 

Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions 

Epileptic psychoses 

Psych on euroses and neuroses, total 

Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) 

Psychoses with psychopathic personality 

Psychoses with mental deficiency 

Undiagnosed psychoses 

Without psychosis, total 

Psychopathic personality without psychosis 

Others 



Total. 



M. 



M. 


F. 


T. 




3 


8 


11 


7 

z 


2 


9 


_ 
3 


_ 


_ 
3 


13 


10 


23 


4 


2 


6 


2 


6 


8 




3 


3 


7 


9 


16 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 








3 




3 


33 


33 


66 



Table 7 — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Race 


Total 1 

1 


Senile | 


With [| 
cerebral \ 
arterio- i 
sclerosis ' 


1 

Alcoholic 1 

I 


With 
other 
somatic 
diseases 


Manic- 
depres- 
sive 




M. 


F. 


T. ; 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 


14 


14 


28 1 
4 


2 


5 


7 


3 


1 




2 




2 


1 


1 2 


1 


2 


3 


Finish 


3 


1 








2 






















French 


3 


5 






1 


1 
















1 1 
- 1 




1 
1 


1 


Irish 


4 


4 


1 


1 








1 




1 


1 


1 


2 




2 




2 1 




















1 


- 1 








1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2 
























1 


1 


Scandinaviant 


11 

1 i 








1 












1 


- 1 






Slavonic t 












1 ; 
































1 


















Mixed 


1 
1 


5 


6 i 
3 




1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


11 
















1 


Race unascertained 


2 




I - 
















Total 


33 


1 33 


66 




8 

1 


11 




2 




I3 
1 




3 


4 


2 6 


2 


6 


8 























24 



P.D. 70 



Table 7 — Race of Fisrt Admissions classified with Reference Psychoses for the Year 
ending September 30, 1926 — Concluded 



1 

Race 


Involu- 
tion 
melan- 
cholia 


Dementia 
praecox 


Psycho - 
neuroses 
and 
neuroses 


With 
psycho- 
pathic 
person- 
ality 


With 
mental 
deficiency 


1 

j 

Without 
psychosis 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M 


.F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


. F. 


T 






2 


2 




3 


3 












2 




2 


3 














1 




1 








1 


1 














FrBncli 








1 


1 


2 






1 




1 


1 


1 


2 












1 


1 




2 


2 
































1 




1 
























Lithuanian 








1 


1 


2 
























Scandinavian 


































Scotch 




































Slavonic 








1 




1 
























Syrian 








1 




1 


































1 


1 


- 1 


1 




























1 


1 


2 






















































Total 




3 


3 


7 


9 


16 


- 1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 


3 




3 





































blovenian. 

♦includes "North" and "South". fNorwegians, Danes, and Swedes. JIncludes Bohemian, Bosnian, 
Croatin, Dalmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, Russian, Ruthenian, Servian, Slovak, 
Slovenian. 



Table 8 — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1926 











15—19 


20—24 


25—29 


30—34 


Psychoses 




Total 


Years 


Years 


Years 




Years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




3 


8 


11 
9 




























7 


2 




























3 




3 


























With other somatic diseases 


4 


2 


6 








1 




1 














Manic-depressive 


2 


6 


8 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 












3 


3 






























9 


16 


1 




1 


3 




3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 


























With psychopathic personality 


1 


1 


2 




















1 




1 


With mental deficiency 


3 


1 


4 




















1 








3 




3 


2 




2 




















Total 


33 


33 


66 


4 


1 


5 


4 




4 


2 


2 


4 


3 


2 


5 



Table 8 — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Continued 



Psychoses 


35—39 
Years 


40—44 
Years 


45^9 
Years 


50—54 
Years 




M. 


F 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




























With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

Alcoholic 














2 
1 




2 
1 








With other somatic diseases 




1 


1 














1 




1 
















3 


3 


1 


1 


Involution melancholia 




1 


1 




4 


4 


1 


1 
1 


1 
2 








Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

With psychopathic personalitv 










1 


1 












With mental deficiency 








1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


Without psychosis ^ 
























Total 








1 


5 




4 


6 


10 


2 


1 


3 

























P.D. 70 25 
Table 8 — Age of First Amissions classified with reference to Principal Psychoses, 



for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Concluded 





55-59 
Years 


i 
i 

j 60-64 
I Years 


65-69 
Years 


70 Years 
and over 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 










1 


2 


3 




1 




2 


5 


7 




1 




1 








1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 




1 




1 








1 




1 










1 




1 


1 




1 










1 


1 




































1 


1 




1 


1 








Dementia praecox 










































1 


1 








With psychopathic personality 


























With mental deficiency 














































1 




1 




























Total 


3 




3 


2 


3 


5 


2 


4 


6 


6 


7 


13 





















Table 9 — Degree of Education of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Illiterate 


1 

1 Reads and 
! writes* 

i 


Common 
School 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


3 


8 


11 




1 


1 


1 




1 


2 


6 


8 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


7 


2 


9 

3 








1 




1 


5 


1 


6 


Alcoholic 


3 




1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


With other somatic diseases ^ 


4 
2 


2 
6 


6 
8 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 
2 


1 


1 
2 


2 
2 






3 
9 


3 
16 
















Dementia praecox 


7 




1 


1 


3 




3 


3 


4 


7 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 








1 


1 


With psychopathic personality 


1 


1 


2 
















1 


1 


With mental deficiency 


3 


1 


4 








1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Without psychosis 


3 




3 












2 




2 


























Total 


33 


33 


66 


1 


3 


4 


8 


2 


10 


15 


17 


32 

















'-Includes those who did not complete fourth grade in school. 



Table 9 — Degree of Education of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Concluded. 



Psychoses 


High 
School 


College 


Unascer- 
tained 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T- 


Senile 










1 


1 






With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


1 


1 


2 










Alcoholic 


















With other somatic diseases 


1 




1 


1 




1 






Manic-depressive 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 






Involution melancholia 




3 


3 












Dementia praecox 




3 


3 






1 


1 


- 1 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


















With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 












With mental deficiency 


1 




1 
1 












Without psychosis 


1 






























Total 


7 


8 


15 


1 


3 


4 


1 


- 1 



















26 



P.D. 70 



Table 10 — Environment of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



FSYCHOSES 


Total 


Urban 


Rural 


Unascer- 
tained 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




3 


8 


11 




g 


11 
















7 


2 


9 


7 


1 


8 




1 


1 










3 




3 


3 




3 
















4 


2 


6 


3 


2 


5 








1 




1 




2 


6 


8 


1 


5 


6 


1 


1 


2 












3 


3 




2 


2 




1 


1 










7 


9 


16 


6 


9 


15 








1 




1 






1 


1 










1 


1 










1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 
















3 


1 


4 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 










3 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 








Total 


33 


33 


66 


28 


29 


57 


3 


4 


7 


2 




2 



Table 11 — Economic Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Dep endent 


Marginal 


Comfortable 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


3 


8 


11 


2 


5 


7 








1 


3 


4 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


7 


2 


9 


1 




1 


2 




2 


4 


2 


6 


Alcoholic 


3 




3 


1 




1 


2 




2 










4 


2 


6 




1 


1 




1 


1 


4 




4 




2 


6 


8 










3 


3 


2 


3 


5 






3 


3 
















3 


3 


Dementia praecox 


7 


9 


16 


3 


2 


5 


2 


3 


5 


2 


4 


6 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 














1 


1 




1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 










3 
3 


1 


4 


3 




3 




1 


1 

3 








Without psychosis 




3 








3 




































Total 


33 


33 


66 


10 


8 


18 


10 


9 


19 


13 


16 


29 



Table 12 — Use of Alcohol by First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Abstinent 


Tempera te 


Intem- 
perate 


Unascer- 
tained 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




3 
7 

3 


8 
2 


11 
9 

3 


2 


8 
2 


10 
2 


1 
6 




1 
6 














With cerebral arteriosclerosis .... 




1 

3 




1 
3 










4 

^ 2 


2 
6 


6 
8 


2 
1 


2 
6 


4 
7 


2 
1 




2 
1 
















3 


3 




3 


3 




















7 


9 


16 




9 


9 


1 




1 


5 




5 


1 




1 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses .... 
With psychopathic personality . . . 
With mental deficiency 


1 

3 


1 
1 
1 


1 
2 
4 


1 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 


1 
2 




1 
2 














3 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 














































Total 


33 


33 


66 


8 


33 


41 


15 




15 


9 





9 


1 




1 





















P.D. 70 



27 



Table 13 — Marital Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30,1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


3 


8 


11 


1 


2 


3 




2 


2 


2 


4 


6 




7 


2 


9 


1 




1 


5 


1 


6 


1 


1 


2 




3 




3 








1 




1 










4 


2 


6 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 




1 


1 




2 


6 


8 


2 


3 


5 




3 


3 












3 


3 




1 


1 




2 


2 










7 


9 


16 


6 


3 


9 




5 


5 












1 


1 










1 


1 










1 


1 


2 






1 




1 


1 








With mental deficiency 


3 


1 


4 


3 




3 








































Without psychosis 


3 




3 


2 




2 


1 




1 








Total 


33 


33 


66 


18 


10 


28 


9 


15 


24 


3 


6 


9 



Table 13. — Marital Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Concluded 



Psychosis 


Separated 


Divorced 


Unascer- 
tained 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 




















With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




















Alcoholic 


2 




2 






















































Involution melancholia 






























1 


1 


1 




1 






















With psychopathic personality 






























1 


1 




























Without psychosis 




















Total 


2 




2 




2 


2 


1 




1 



















Table 14 — Psychoses of Readmissions for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Psychoses 


Males 


Females 


Total 




1 




1 


Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 




1 


1 




4 


3 


7 


Dementia praecox 


2 


4 


6 


Psychoses with mental deficiency 


1 




1 


Total 


8 


8 


16 





28 



P.D. 70 



Table 15 — Discharges of Patients classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
and Condition on Discharge for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Psychoses 


Total 


Re- 
covered 


Improved 


Unim- 
proved 


Without 
Psychoses 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


_ ., 


1 




1 








1 




1 
















1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 


1 
















1 




1 








1 




1 














With other somatic diseases 


1 


3 


4 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 
















7 


2 


9 


1 


1 


2 


5 


1 


6 


1 




1 

3 










3 


4 


7 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 








Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 




1 


1 




1 




















Without psychosis 


2 
1 


2 


2 
3 




1 


1 


2 


1 


2 
1 








1 




1 


































Total 


18 


12 


30 


3 


5 


8 


11 


6 


17 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 

















Table 16 — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Causes of Death 


1 

Total 

i 


Senile 


With 
Cerebral 
Arterio- 
sclerosis 


Alcoholic 


Manic- 
depressive 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F- 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


General Diseases 


































5 


6 


11 














1 




1 




1 


1 


Nervous System 
































Apoplexy (cerebral hemorrhage) . . . 


3 


10 


13 




1 


1 




3 


3 


1 




1 




1 


1 


Circulatory System 
































Endocarditis and myocarditis 


12 


8 


20 


4 


4 


8 


1 




1 










1 


1 




2 


4 


6 




2 


2 








1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Respiratory System 


































1 




1 




























2 




2 


























Digestive System 
































Other diseases of digestive system 
































(cancer and tuberculosis excepted) 


1 




1 




















1 




1 


Genito- Urinary System 
































Chronic nephritis 


2 




2 


























Total 


28 


28 


56 


4 


7 


11 


1 


3 




3 




3 

1 




4 


6 



Table 16 — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Concluded 



Causes of Death 


Dementia 
praecox 


Paranoia 
or 

paranoid 
conditions 


With 
mental 
deficiency 


*A11 other 
psychoses 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


General Diseases 




























4 


5 


9 




















Nervous System 


























Apoplexy (cerebral hemorrhage) 


1 


5 


6 








1 




1 








Circulatory System 




























4 


2 


6 


1 




1 




1 


1 


2 




2 
























1 


1 


Respiratory System 




























1 




1 






















2 




2 




















Digestive System 


























Other diseases of digestive system (cancer and 




















































Genito- Urinary System 




























2 




2 




















Total 




12 


26 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 



P.D. 70 29 



Table 17 — Age of Patients at Time of Death classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending Scptemher 30. 1926 





Total 


, 25-29 
Years 


30-34 ; 
Years 


35-39 
Years 


1 40-44 ! 
Years ' 


45-^9 
Years 




M. 


F. 


T. , 


M. 




T. 


M. 


F. 


T. , 




F. 


T. 


■ M. 


F. 


T. 


.M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


4 




11 
























! 








W^itn cerebral arxerio- 
sclerosis 


1 


3 


4 
































With Huntington's chorea 
Alcoholic 


1 
3 




1 

3 


























1 




1 


i t h other sonisi'tic 

diseases 




1 


1 
6 
































Manic-depressive 


2 


4 




















1 




1 




1 


1 


Dementia praecox 


14 


12 


26 


3 






1 




1 


2 


2 


4 




1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


Paranoia or paranoid, con- 


1 




1 




























With mental deficiency . . 
Without psychosis 


1 
1 


1 


2 
1 
































Total 


2S 


28 


56 


3 




3 


1 




1 


2 


2 




1 


1 


2 


h 


3 


6 
















1 















Table 17 — A.ge of Patients at Time of Death classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending Septem.ber 30, 1926 — Concluded 



Psychoses 


50-54 1 
Years ' 


55-59 
Years 


60-64 
Years 


65-69 
Years | 


70 years 
and over 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


T 


T. ; 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 














1 










2 


3 


3 


6 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




1 


1 ! 














1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


With Huntington's Chorea 




















1 




1 








Alcoholic 








1 




1 








1 




1 




































1 


1 


Manic-depressive 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


1 




1 




2 
o 


2 
2 


1 
2 


1 
1 


2 
3 






















1 




1 








With mental deficiency 


























1 


1 


2 


Without psvchosis 


























1 




1 
































Total 


1 








o 


5 


•7 


2 








11 


8 


8 


16 































30 



P.D. 70 



Table 18 — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 



Total 



Psychoses 



xM. F. T. 



Senile 


4 


7 


11 


With cerebral arterio- 










1 


3 


4 


With Huntington's chorea 


1 




1 


Alcoholic 


3 




3 


With other somatic 








diseases 




1 


1 


Manic-depressive 


2 


4 


6 


Dementia praecox 


14 


12 


26 


Paranoia or paranoid con- 








ditions 


1 




1 


With mental deficiency . . 


1 


1 


2 


Without psychosis 


1 




1 


Total 


28 


28 


56 



Less than : 1-3 
1 month I months 



M. F. T. 



4—7 
months 

M. F. T. i ' M. F. f. 



2 I 4 



8—12 i 
months | 



1—2 
Year; 



M. F. T. 



Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1926 — Con. 



Psychoses 


3-4 
Years 


5-9 
Years 


10-14 
Years 


15-19 
Years i 


20 
Years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 
































With cerebral arteriosclerosis 














1 




1 














With Huntington's chorea 
































2 




2 




















1 




1 


With other somatic diseases 
















































1 


1 

2 


1 




1 
12 


Dementia praecox 


2 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 


3 


3 


6 


2 


6 


6 


Paranoia or paranoid conditions 














1 




1 














With mental deficiency 










1 


1 














1 




1 


Without psychosis 


- 
















~ 






~ 








Total 


T 


2 


6 


1 


2 


3 


5 


3 


8 


o 


1 


3 


9 


6 


15 




















1 " 











Table 19 — Family Care Department 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Remaining September 30, 1925 






40 


4" 


Admitted within the year 




6 


21 


27 


Whole number of cases within the year . 




13 


61 


74 






7 




23 


Retu'. ned to Institution 






]t 


21 


Discharged 








1 


Escaoed 




I 














Died 






I 




Remaining September 30, 1926 




6 


45 


51 


Supported by State 




4 


39 


43 






2 




8 


Number of different persons within the year 




9 


2? 


36 


Number of different persons admitted 




6 


21 


27 


Number of different persons dismissed 






16 


23 


Daily average number 




6.205 


43.088 


49.293 


Self-supporting 




2.205 


5.041 


7.246 


State 




4.000 


38.047 


42 . 047 





/9^7 No. 70 



Public Document 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OP 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1927 



Department of Mental Diseases, 




PVBLICATION OF THIS DOCL'XIENT APPROVED BY THE COMMISSION ON APMINISTRATIOH AMO FlNANCS 

560 4-'28 Order 1933 

OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 

DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE COLONY 
PRINTERS 




TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 

of the 

GARDNER STATE COLONY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. 
Thomas R. P. Gibb, Rockport, Mass. 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner, Mass. 
Mrs. Alice M. Spring, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg, Mass. 
George A. Marshall, Fitchburg, Mass. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Cqarles E. Thompson, M.D., Supeiintendent. 
LoNNiE 0. Farrar, M.D., Asst. Superintendent. 
William B. T. Smith, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mart A. Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

^ Senior Assistant Physician. 

J. Herbert Maycock, D. M. D., Dentist. 

Myron L. Marr, Steward. 

Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 

Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 

Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 

Ethel M . Hall, Social Service Worker. 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving ,Knitting, Etc. 
David Profit, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry 1,. Neilson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
John H. Jenkins, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Walter Warm an, Supervisor of Pottery. 
Edward C. C0BE7, Supervisor of Printing. 



SUPERVISORS 
Glaj)ys C. RipLET, R.N., Women's Infimary. 
Alto'N J. WiisrcHENBACH, Men's Infimary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, R.N. , Hospital. 
Elvira- I. Winceenbach, R.N., Treatment Building. 

Matron Colonies 
Mrs. Catherine Bowman Belcher Cottage 
Mrs.- Myrtie Sprague 



Mrs. Mertie Morse 
Mrs. Minnie Larkin 
Mrs. Beren Morse 
Mrs. Mabel Sanderson 
Mrs. Gladys Bennett 
Miss Helen G. Batchelder Highland Cottage 
Wachusett Cottage 



Hillcrest Cottage 
Valley Cottage 
Gardner Cottage 
Westminster Cottage 
Fairview Cottage 
Overlook Cottage 



Supervisors 



Streeter G. Sprague 
Fred Morse 
Herbert J. Larkin 
Merrill Morse 



George F. Steele 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES 
Rev. James T. Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in turn, Protestant. 



V'.D. 70 3 
tjfjt Commontoealtf) of JilaStfattuSetts 

TRUSTEES' REPORT 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

We have the honor to present herewith the twenty-fifth Annual Report of the 
Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

During the year just closed the Trustees have suffered the loss of Mr. George 
N. Harwood from their membership. Mr. Harwood's health has not permitted 
him to continue his active connection with the Hospital. His interest in an honor- 
ary and consulting capacity we hope will continue. Mr. Harwood has been 
connected with the Gardner State Colony from its earliest days. As Agent of the 
State Board of Insanity he was appointed to bond, investigate titles and to arrange 
for the survey and purchase of land for the establishment of the Colony. He was 
appointed one of the first Trustees by Governor Crane under Chapter 451, Acts of 
1900. Mr. Harwood, because of his experience and knowledge as an agriculturist, 
has been of especial value to the Board of Trustees. In his place Governor Fuller 
has appointed Mr. George A. Marshall of Fitchburg. 

The new building for the treatment of disturbed women patients was completed 
and occupied in July. This fills a gre^t need of the institution. This building makes 
it possible to take the more disturbed and noisy patients from the women's In- 
firmary, thus the patients left in the Infirmary are under much more satisfactory 
and restful conditions. The disturbed women are where they can receive proper 
treatment and care without distressing other patients. In this new building a 
personal hygiene department has been established for the details of which referenc e 
is made to the Superintendent's report. Your Trustees are particularly pleased 
with the good effect which this seems to have upon the well-being of the patients. 

Needs of the Colony 

1. A building for the treatment of disturbed men, similar to the one for women 
which has just been completed. 

2. A Superintendent's house. 

3. Additional sewerage disposal. 

4. A dairy building. 

While the Trustees are entirely in sympathy with all the needs expressed in the 
Superintendent's report it wishes to emphasize the four enumerated above. From 
the Trustee's Report for the year 1925 we quote the following: 

"The Trustees consider that a Superintendent's house is most important 
for the well-being of the State Colony, The Superintendent and his family 
are entitled to living quarters which will take him away from the strain of 
his daily association with patients and business. The high character of our 
hospitals for the insane can only be maintained by having at the head of 
them men of capacity, humanity, and professional skill. Such men can 
only be procured in the long run when they are given proper conditions 
under which to live and do their work." 
The Trustees feel the very great importance of providing suitable quarters for 
their Superintendent. 

The Trustees again commend the conscientious, humane and efficient work of 
Dr. Charles E. Thompson, the Superintendent of the Colony. 

AMIE H. GOES GEORGE A. MARSHALL 

THOMAS R. P. GIBB THOMAS H. SHEA 

OWEN A. HOBAN ALICE M. SPRING 

FREDERIC A. WASHBURN, Chairman, 

January, 10, 1928. 



4 



P.D. 70 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

This is the twenty-fifth report of the Gardner State Colony. The hospital year 
ends September 30th. The financial year November 30th. 

Relating to Patients. 

The number on the books September 30, 1926 was 1118. The number admitted 
during the year was 169 as follows: By first admission 89; by readmission 13; by 
transfer from other hospitals, 67. The total number under treatment during the 
year was 1287. 

There were discharged 123 as follows: Recovered 15; improved 30; as not insane 
4; as not improved 15; transferred to other hospitals 4; died 55. The number 
remaining on our books September 30, 1927 was 1164. The number actually in 
the hospital September 30th was 1069 and in Family Care 60. The daily average 
number under care was 1071 as follows: In the hospital 1011; in Family Care, 60. 

Of the 89 admitted by direct admission 66 were admitted for the first time to 
any hospital. The nationality of the 66 admitted is of interest; 42 were born in 
the United States, 24 in foreign countries. Still further the parentage is of interest: 
Of the 42 born in the United States 23 were born of parents born in the United 
States and 19 born of parents of foreign birth. Of the 24 born in foreign countries 
7 were born in Finland, 6 in Canada, 2 in Russia, 1 each in Germany, Italy, Norway, 
Scotland, Sweden and 4 in Ireland. The ages of the 66 first admissions were as 
as follows: 4 were under 24 years of age; 13 between 25 and 40; 21 between 40 and 
55; 17 between 55 and 70; 11 over 70 years. Table 6 shows the form of mental 
disease in these first admissions. 

A study of the education of these first admissions shows that 2 had college 
education; 12 high school; 36 common school; 12 could read and write; 2 illiterate; 
2 unascertained. A study of the economic condition shows 27 comfortable; 29 
marginal; 8 dependent; 2 unascertained. 

Of the 55 who died, 22 died of diseases of the heart; 12 diseases of the nervous 
system; 9 tuberculosis; 3 pneumonia; 2 diseases of the digestive system; 1 cancer; 
2 general diseases; 1 suicide. 

I regret to have to report the suicide of a patient on April 3 by hanging. This 
was the first case of death by suicide during the 25 years of the Colony. 

Family Care. 

Family Care has been continued and places in homes have been kept filled so 
far as finances have permitted. September 30, 1926, there were 51 placed in 
Family Care. The average daily number so placed for the year was 60. Because 
of insufficient money with which to pay board it was necessary to reduce the number 
and on September 30, 1927, there were 56 in Family Care. Of the average daily 
Bumber of 60, 47 were supported by the State and 13 were self-supporting. 

Diversion. 

Dances have been held at frequent intervals with special parties on all holidays. 

The Colony Orchestra and Colony Band furnished music for these. Motion 
picture entertainments were held each week through the Winter months. Baseball 
games several times during the week during the Summer months provided desirable 
entertainment. Band concerts were given out of doors at frequent intervals. 
The Annual Field Day was held October first with an all day out-of-door program. 
The merry-go-round has again proved a very desirable form of diversion. 



P.D. 70 



5 



The spirit of co-operation shown by all of our employees in all of our activities 
has made them very successful. While certain of the activities are in the usual 
line of duty the spirit and helpfulness shown is something far beyond this and is 
to be commended. 

Dr. Cesareo DeAsis, Assistant Physician, concluded his services October first, 
being transferred to the Staff of the Worcester State Hospital. Dr. Mary Danforth 
was appointed October first to succeed him. Dr. W. B. T. Smith was appointed 
Assistant Physician on March first. Charles S. Mudgett, Senior Medical Student 
of the University of Vermont served as Clinical Assistant during the Summer. 
There exists a vacancy in the position of Senior Assistant Physician due to the 
promotion of Dr. Lonnie O. Farrar from Senior Assistant to Assistant Superinten- 
dent. 

The Worcester North District Medical Society met with us on July 12th. There 
were 120 present. 

I would report the death of two officers who were among the first to come to 
the Colony when it was established. Eugene L. Bryant who had served as super- 
visor for over 20 years and Pliny W. Sanderson, Chef for 16 years. Both of these 
men gave of their best to the development of the Colony and will be much missed. 

Dental. 

A registered dentist and graduate dental nurse have been employed full time 
in the care of teeth and d ntal conditions. There have been 2,689 examinations 
made, 2.091 prophylactic treatments, 1,847 fillings, 342 extractions, 287 root 
canal treatments, 9r minor surgical operations, 700 pyorrhea treatments, 427 
special treatments, and the making and repairing of 30 artificial plates. 

Occupational Therapy. 
Thi? has continued to receive our special attention. Treatment is prescribed 
at the time of Staff Meeting in the case of all new admissions and thereafter by 
the physician on each service. It is frequently more important than strictly 
medical therapy. Individual adjustment is an important factor. During the 
year 85% of all patients have been occupied at regular or diversified occupation 
and ndustry under trained instructors. Our policy is to endeavor so far as practical 
to encourage constructive occupation. Something really worth while accomplished 
must be the best and most encouraging incentive to any individual. Not all arc 
able to construct. To those have been given the simpler diversions and occupations 
which serve chiefly to interest and to divert the mind. An increasing number is 
seen each year who are not physically able to occupy themselves but require in- 
tensive hospital treatment. The admission of, and accumulation of, the aged, 
the disturbed, and the general paralytic, accounts for the larger number of those 
unoccupied. 

A table following this report will show what has been accomplished in articles 
completed. A table cannot show the benefit accruing to individuals any more than 
the reader is able to evaluate his own occupation. What one would have been or 
what he may have done without occupation or diversion is unknown except by 
comparison with others not occupied. Without normal physical and mental 
interest it is certain the results would not have been as satisfactory. To assist 
in adjusting the individual to a more normal being and doing is our chief aim in the 
use of Occupational and Diversional Therapy. 

Printing. 

Since the beginning of our fiscal year 1924, we have been operating a printing 
department for the Department of Mental Diseases. This department has been 



6 



P.D. 70 



enlarged and all forms used by the fiftean institutions under the Department of 
Mental Diseases are printed here and this year the additional work of printing the 
Annual Reports for these fifteen institutions was added. 

This department now has one Kelly press, three automatic job presses, one 
hand feed job press and a smaller press for card work. The purpose of this is not 
alone for the work that is accomplished but it also provides occupation for fourteen 
patients. The total output of the plant figures approximately one and one-fourth 
million impressions per year. 

Farm axd Grounds. 
Hall C. Bowman succeeded Maurice S. Powell as Head Farmer in March. The 
year has been a very satisfactory one on the farm. The total value of farm crops, 
including all land products this year was $85,533.48 an increase over 1926 o! 
$7,445.19. The increase is due chiefly to an increased production of apples, pears, 
strawberries, and all garden crops, with the exception of potatoes. The same 
acreage of potatoes was planted as in 1926 and a yield of about 4500 bushel was 
promised until continued rain in the Fall caused rot at the time of harvesting, 
reducing the crop to 2,800 bushels. 50 tons more hay was harvested than last 
year; 8,978 lbs. more beef slaughtered; 14,748 lbs. more pork; 503 more poultry; 
and 113 lbs. more turkey. 

The herd of cows again successfully passed the State and Federal tests for 
tuberculosis for the second year. This tuberculin-free herd has been developed 
from a former tubercular herd by special attention to the care of young stock and 
was possible only by the daily interest of those men caring for them. The milk 
yield for the year averaged 12,202 lbs. per cow. 

While poultry hss been raised successfully, stock, which proved to be inferior, 
has reduced the number. 2,000 day old chicks were purchased. A five percent 
loss occurred during the first month, a twelve percent loss during the first three 
months, and it was advisable to make a reduction of fifty percent during six months 
so that where we expected to have 1,000 pullets we now have but 390. To operate 
the poultry plant successfully and economically we should carry at least 900 to 
1,000. Of course to offset the above apparent loss was 3,690 lbs. of poultry killed 
and used. 359}^ lbs. of turkey was raised and used. 

Difliculty was again experienced in the raising of early spring pigs. This diflSculty 
was apparently finally overcome and we ended the year with 182 pigs in splended 
condition. We have slaughtered and consumed 38,946 lbs. of pork, 14,748 more 
that last year. 

Continuing the policy of reforestation we set out 10,000 white pine seedlings 
and 5,000 Norway spruce. 65 acres of land have been cleared of underbrush, S}/2 
acres of land have been cleared and added to fields, 33,306 ft. of lumber was cut 
and sawed, 710 cords of wood cut and sawed, 1,740 tons of ice harvested. 

886 tons of stone were removed from fields, 1,140 tons of rock excavated and 2,609 
cubic yards of earth excavated. This material was used in roads and the following 
work accomplished: Roads rebuilt 1,566 sq. yds; roads resurfaced 2,744 sq. yds; 
walks resurfaced 561 sq. yds; grading 3,923 sq. yds; new road constructed 8,885 
sq. yds. 

The Reo dump truck purchsaed this year has been constantly busy and has 
proved its value. In resurfacing roads alone 1,200 loads of gravel have been 
hauled. 

The cannery again has taken care of the surplus fruit and vegetables at the time 
of maturity and the value of canned fruits this year is $2,594 an increase of $500 
over last year. 



P.D. 70 



7 



Addition's by Special Appropriations. 
A Treatment Building to accommodate 86 women was completed and occupied 
in July. 

Necessary changes were made in the subway connecting this building with the 
hospital and \\ ith the main kitchen and this subway is now used for communication 
and for food conveyance. 

The building contains special provision for hydrotherapy, personal hygiene and 
physical- therapy. There is a continuous bathroom containing four continuous 
baths. There are two sedation suites, one on each of two floors, each consisting 
of five single and separate rooms together with a continuous bathroom. To supple- 
ment these there is a preparation room, artificial ice machine, two utility pack 
preparation rooms, facilities for drying sheets and blankets, a spray room. 

A rather complete physical-therapy equipment consisting of a Morse wave 
generator, a water cooled and an air cooled ultra-\-iolet ray machine, a permanent 
and a portable diathermy, and a Kellogg electric light cabinet have been installed. 
A skilled operator is employed full time in this Department. 

A feature, new in this part of the country-, namely a Personal Hygiene De- 
partment, has been established. This Department consists of four rooms with 
necessary' appliances for the care of the hair, face, hands and feet. The personal 
appearance and comfort of patients in hospitals such as this has frequently been 
neglected. 

The special facilities established for gi\ing care to troublesome conditions of 
the feet is, so far as I know, a new departure. This room will necessarily be under 
the super\4sion of a physician. 

From the time of its establishment, this Department has made a veiy favorable 
appeal to our women patients and has been fully utilized. One operator and two 
patients assisting are occupied full time. There has already been noticed an 
improved physical appearance of many of the women and an improved mental 
attitude. Facilities for treatment such as this cannot fail to result in encourage- 
ment of the individual and individual adjustment must come before environ- 
mental adjustment can be made. 

A cottage for housing twelve employees has been erected and is now ready for 
occupancy. 

An appropriation for additional laundry machinery permitted us to install a 
42x84 Stewart washer, a 48" Tolhurst extractor, and conveyors for clothing. 

An appropriation of $4,000, one half of the amount requested for construction 
of filter beds, was made but inasmuch as one-half of the work could not be done 
for one half of the money, this money will remain unused until an additional 
appropriation requested may be made. 

Food conveyors, from which food will be served direct to the tables in our 
congregate dining room, have been purchased and hereafter food will be served 
from trucks instead of upon tables in advance of the entry of patients. 

Seven and one-half acres of land have been purchased. This was necessary 
that we might better drain a forty-acre piece of lowland. 

Unusual Repaijrs and Renewals. 

The 300,000 gallon steel water tower has been scraped and painted inside and 
out. The condition of this tower was found to be practically as good as when 
constructed 15 years ago. 

At the Belcher Cottage an outside cement room has been constructed for the 
heating boiler, wood, and coal. This removed the fire risk from the cottage. 

Vegetable storage cellars at the Westminster Cottages, Gardner Cottages, and 
Receiving Group have been reconstructed, cement floors laid, plank ventilated 
bins, proper ventilation and lighting provided. 



8 



P.D. 70 



A cement sidewalk to the Men's Infirmary has been constructed which completes 
the cement sidewalks within the quadrangle. 

Fencing with which to enclose the salvage yard has been purchased. 

A 1000' extension of the 6" water main has been completed at the Receiving 
Group. This extension will provide better service and better fire protection. 

850' of 6' pipe has been purchased for the extension of the outside water main 
4t the Westminster Cottages which when completed, will give us a water system 
serving all of the outside colonies and will allow cutting off of service to any one 
colony without discontinuing the supply to all. 

Repairs of the coal trestle required by the Boston & Maine Railroad have been 
made. 

General Repairs and Improvements. 
The general repairs and improvements made have been the covering of the 
roofs at the Westminster and Bielcher Cottages with asbestos shingles; the con- 
struction of a machine shop; the installation of a hot water circulating system 
with an additional boiler, pump and brass piping to the Laundry, Hospital and 
Treatment Building; an x-ray equipment has been installed; the toilet rooms 
at the Gardner Cottages and Men's Infirmary have been renovated and new fixtures 
installed; a smoking room and pool room have been constructed for men at the 
Gardner Cottages; construction of the road to the town of Wesminster has occupied 
the time of a large group of men during most of the Summer and Fall. 

RecoTvimendattons. 

The following special needs have been submitted to the Department of Mental 
Diseases for their approval: 

1. Employees' Cottage to House Twelve. 

This is essential to house those employees allowed in our quota but who cannot 
live here because of lack of room. This would also provide for the necessary quota 
to man the Treatment Building for men. 

2. Treatment Building for Men. 

We have no building in which to provide suitable treatment for men. The 
disturbed and destructive are at present scattered in various buildings but chiefly 
housed in our Men's Infimary. They are receiving custody, not treatment. 
Those who are most disturbed must be in our Men s Infirmary which building is 
adjacent t the other buildings. This disturbance of mind can be control ed if 
facilities for treatment are available. An appropriation for a treatment building 
similar to that opened this year for women is urgently requested. 

3. Additional Sewage Disposal Facilities. 

Our present filter beds, eight in number, were constructed in 1904 and since then 
have not been enlarged. The population which they serve has increased to a 
point where the beds are now required to do two and three-tenths times their 
capacity. A small appropriation was granted in- 1927 but could not be used as it 
was insufficient. To this should be added a larger amount of money this year with 
which to construct eight additional beds. 

4. Coal Trestle and Sidetrack. 

All coal burned at the Power House since 1904 has been carted to the boiler room 
'« wheelbarrows. This is a tremendous task. During the month of November 
alone the time of attendants and patients totalled 1776 hours wheeling coal. The 
men occupied in this work could have been used to much better advantage in 
other work. 

Qur present coal trestle has required annual repairs since construction and be- 
cause of its type of construction will need repairs each year that it is maintained. 
Again I recommend relocation of coal trestle to a point adj -.cent to the boiler 



P.D. 70 



9 



room with a sidetrack running to it so that coal may be unloaded from the cars 
directly adjacent to the boiler room. The cost of construction will be offset in 
a very few years by avoiding yearly repairs on our present trestle and will release 
our men for other work. 

5. Dairy Building. 

We are badly in need of a suitable room for h*andling milk. At present we are 
using a small building immediately connected with the cow barn, of wood con- 
struction, not sanitary, and in this room the washing of hands and bottles must 
be carried on, as well as the preparation and pasteurizing of milk. An entirelv 
separate building is recommended. 

6. Two Bungalow Cottages for Officers. 

This hospital is located three miles from any town. Certain persons occupying 
major positions should be given separate houses for their families. We cannot 
expect them to make this their permanent work if they are not properly housed. 

All of the above with the exception of the Treatment Building for men, would 
be constructed by our own men, thus lessening the cost. 

7. Road Work, $1,000. 

This is for the completion of the building of the main highway between the town 
of Westminster and the Colony, a distance of two and one-half miles. Nearly a 
mile was constructed this year and the work should be completed in 1928. This 
road construction is done in co-operation with the town of Westminster, the County 
and the Department of Public Works. 

Acknowledgments. 

I gratefully acknowledge and take this opportunity to express my appreciation 
of the interest the following have shown in our work here and by the donations 
which they have made. 

Books, Magazines and magazine subscriptions have been received from the 
following: Mrs. M. G. Munro, Gardner; Mrs. C. P. Pearson, Gardner; Mrs. W. H. 
Burns, Gardner; John J. Doherty, Gardner; Mrs. Lura Coburn, Gardner; Dr. P. 
J. Grant, Gardner; Mrs. Charles Dewey, Gardner; Ridgeley Club, Gardner; Dr. 
Alice Walker, Gardner; Mrs. C. J. Underwood, Gardner; Mrs. J. E.Bodett, Gardner; 
Mrs. C. H. Hartshorn, Gardner; Mrs. Fred Bancroft, Gardner; Girl Scouts, So. 
Ashburnham; Mr. Robert Douglas, Fitchburg; Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Worcester; 
Mass. General Hospital, Boston; Mrs. Herbert Kendall, Gardner; Mrs. Samuel 
Kane, Gardner; Miss Frances Danforth, Gardner; Mrs. Paul Cody, Gardner; Mr, 
Geo. A. Dunn, Gardner; Mrs. Geo. Keyworth, Gardner; Heywood Memorial 
Hospital, Gardner; Mrs. John H. May, Gardner; Owen A. Hoban, Gardner; Mrs. 
Edward Walker, Gardner; Mrs. E. L. Bryant, Northboro; Dora Bros., Gardner; 
S. Benoit, Gardner; Mrs. Elizabeth Barnard, Gardner; F. M. Burns, Gardner; 
American Legion, Gardner; Dr. O'Donnell, Gardner; Amasa Bryant, Gardner; 
L. 0. Greenwood, Gardner; Otto Siebert, Gardner; Geo. R. Warfield, Gardner; 
Dr. W. P. Stapleton, Gardner; Walter Beaman, Gardner; Geo. F. Tucker, Gardner; 
Miss Hattie Gibson, Gardner; Charles Miner, Gardner; J. S. Ames, Gardner; Dr. 
C. H. Bailey; Gardner, Mrs. H. A. Peilett, Gardner; Mrs. Breckwold, Gardner; 
Dr. F. B. Colby, Gardner; Simplex Time Recorder Co., Gardner; Mrs. E. J. Pierce, 
Gardner; Dr. E. W. Munro, Gardner; Geo. Keyworth, Gardner; Mrs. Stephen 
Whittemore, Northfield; George Black, Gardner; Louis A. Wright, Gardner; Elks 
Club, Gardner; Jerome A. Heywood, Gardner; Mrs. Frank Dunn, Gardner; Rep. 
Herman Pehrsson, Gardner; Joseph P. Carney, Gardner; Marcus W. Wright, 
Gardner; Mrs. Oliver Schoonmaker, Ashburnham; Lewis Foskett, Gardner; Mrs. 
Howard M. Ball, Gardner. 

Miscellaneous donations were received as follows: 



t 



10 P'D. 70 

Victrola records and 4 victrolas from the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Boston; Twenty-five pictures, George J. Ferraria of Forbes Lithograph Co., Boston; 
Playing cards, Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Worcester, Mass; Christmas cards, Miss Helen 
C. Nutting, Ashburnham; Flowers, W. H. Ritter, Fitchburg; Envelopes containing 
cigars, chewing gum, candy, etc., for ex-service men. Knights of Columbus, Boston; 
Laurel for use at Christmas time, Frank A. Adams, Westminster. 

In closing this report I wish to express my appreciation of the support and en- 
couragement you have given me in fullest measure at all times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, Superiniendent. 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 

Work done hy Women 
Aprons, various kinds, 911; Bags, various kinds, 469; Balls, crepe paper, 2090; 
Bandages, 1023 doz.; Baskets, various kinds, 197; Bedspreads, 206; Bslls, crepe 
paper, 12; Belts, abdominal 1; Belts, sanitary, 85; Bibs, 3; Binders, abdominal, 24; 
Blankets, 945; Bloomers, 3 pr.; Blouses, 3; Bouquets, crepe paper, 41; Buffet sets, 
9; Bureau covers, 220; Burlap, colored, 651 lbs.; Caps, various kinds, 446; Cards, 
tinted, 12; Centerpieces, 29; Chair covers, 26; Chemises, 426; Coats, 3; Coasters, 
reed, 1; Cord, silk, 1; Corset covers, 20; Combination suits, 165; Couch covers, 3; 
Coveralls, 6; Cuff sets, 1; Curtains, 238; Curtain material woven, 17 yds.; Cushions, 
12; Diapers, 24; Dish cloths, 4; Doilies, various kinds, 545; Doilies, stamped, 124; 
Draperies, 132; Drawers, 193 pr.; Dresses and bungalow aprons, 636; Flowers, 
crepe paper, 2700; Flower pots, clay, 1; Fomentation cloths, 24; Gowns, dental, 
12; Gowns, night, 841; Handkerchiefs, 2232; Handkerchiefs, painted, 4; Hats, 
trimmed, 14; Holders and pads, 279; Holder cases, 38; Icicle paper cut, 24 sheets; 
Ice collars, 18; Ice collar covers, 54; Jackets, crepe paper, 14; Jardinier, reed, 1; 
Jonquils, c. paper, 322; Jumpers, 12; Lace crochet, 156 yds.; Lace insertion, 25 
yds.; Lamp vases, 3; Lamp shades, 7; Luncheon sets, 13; Mittens, 814; Night- 
shirts, 94; Overalls, 366; Napkins, 17; Pads, bed, 4; Petticoats, 234; Princess slips, 
6; Pictures tinted, 11; Pillows, various kinds, 98; Pillow ticks, 206; Pillow slips, 
598; Plaques, clay, 1; Plaques, raffia, 5; Poinsettias, 200; Powder puffs, 15; Quilts. 
7; Quilts, tu^ed, 14; Rags, dyed, 3194 lbs.; Robes, bath, 58; Robes, burial, 18; 
Robes, canton flannel, 26; Rugs, 498; Rugs, stamped, 100; Rugs, bound, 100; 
Runners, 56; Scarfs, 16; Sheets, 2215; Shirts, outside, 70; Slipper tops. 111; Socks, 
53 pr.; Suspenders, 367; Stockings, toed, 7566; Stockings, knit, 14 pr.; Sweater, 1; 
Table cloths, 191; Table runners, 36; Tatting, 22^ yds.; Ties, 711; Ties, novelty, 
4; Ties, crepe paper, 13; Towels, dish, 1528; Towels, Hydro, 125; Towels, Sanitary, 
963; Towels, hand, 2444; Trays, 3; Tub hammocks, 63; Tub covers, 52; Under- 
drawers, men s, 340 pr.; Undershirts, men's, 588; Undershirts, women's, 364; Under- 
drawers, women's, 851; Vases, 25; Vanity sets, 2; Vests, 52; Violets, paper, 285; 
Warp, dyed, 50 lbs.; Woven material, dyed, 54 lbs.; Wool, dyed, 30 lbs.; Yarn, 
dyed, 10 lbs. 

Tailorinq Departmext. 
Caps cut, 360; Caps pressed, 180; Cement bags, rep., 130; Chemises cut, 311; 
Coats made, 755; Clothing repaired and pressed, 3830 pieces; Combinations cut, 
90; Dresses cut, 303; Hospital shirts, 29; Jumpers and overalls cut, 193; Night- 
gowns cut, 229; Nightshirts cat, 253; Reefers made, 79; Robes, burial; cut, 16; 
Shirts, outside, cut, 33; Trousers made, 871; Trousers pressed, 686; Underwear 
cut, 1634; Vests made 118; Vests pressed, 50. 



P.D. 70 



11 



Shoe Department. 

Finished Work. Aprons, rubber, 2; Brogans, 248 pr.; Grummets in tub covers, 
30; Mattress covers, rubber, 14; Mittens, leather, 844 pr.; Pillow slips, rubber, 6; 
Rubber heels put on, 241 pr.; Shoes, men's, 378 pr.; Shoes, women's, 165 pr.; Slip- 
pers 171 pr.; Suspender tips, 92 2. 

Repair Work. Auto curtains, 2; Belts, 1; Bits, 1; Blankets, 1; Breeching straps, 
26; Bridles, 5; Collars, horse, 6; Duck bases, 3; Foot brace, 1; Girth, 1; Hames, 5; 
Harnesses, 11; Halters, 7; Ice bag, 1; Loops, 18; Martingales, 3; Muzzell, 1; Pads, 
1; Radiator hood, 1; Reins, 11 pr.; Snaps, 9; Straps, 17; Shoe boil boot, 1; Team 
tracesj 2. 

Textile Department. 

Repair work. Chairs recovered, 3; Couch recovered, 1; Divan, recovered, 1. 

Finished work. Bed spread material, 535^yds.; Blanket material, 15583^ yds.; 
Brooms, house and barn, 918; Brushes, various kinds, 335; Cocoa mats, 8; Coat 
hangers, 554; Demin, 2462^ yds.; Gingham, 1438^^ yds.; Hose, 6715 pr.; Khaki 
Cloth, 12S0}4 yds.; Mattresses, new, 190; Mattresses, remade, 55; Mattresses, 
ticking, 12993^ yds.; Pillows, new, 206; Pillows, remade, 39; Pocketing, 225 M yds.; 
Sheeting, 2009 yds.; Shirting, 20093^ yds.; Strong cloth, 456 yds.; Special cloth, 
17 yds.; Towelling, 1564 yds.; Underwear material, 1885 yds. 



Mending Done — ^Women's Industrial Building. 
Aprons, 687; Bags, 334; Bathrobes, 42; Bedspreads, 53; Bibs, 30; Blankets, 176; 
Bloomers, 10 pr.; Bureau covers, 12; Caps, 8; Chemises, 1302; Coats, men's, 552; 
Coats, women's, 16; Corsets, 136; Corset covers, 50; Curtains, 50 pr.; Dental chair 
covers, 221; Drawers, 4405; Dresses, 5414; Dress skirts, 34; Dusters, 12; Flags, 
23; Garters, 50; Gloves, 10 pr.; Gowns, surgeon's, 46; Hammocks, tub, 51; Hats, 
50; Holders, 47; Jumpers, 971; Kimonos, 2; Loom covers, 18; Mittens, 171; Nap- 
kins, 33; Nightcaps, 15; Nightgowns, 4607; Overalls, 1197; Pads, 16; Pajamas, 31; 
Petticoats, 2420; Pillow slips, 89; Rugs, 127; Shawls, 59; Sheets, 182; Shirts, out- 
side, 1679; Slippers, 3 pr.; Stockings, men's, 4658; Stockings, women's, 4737; 
Sweaters, 88; Table cloths, 88; Tags sewed on clothing, 458; Towels, 22; Trousers, 
924;Underdrawers, women's, 1700; Underdrawers, men's, 1800; Undershirts, men's, 
1600; Undershirts, women's, 11604; Union suits, women s, 191; Union suits, men's 
170; Vests, 125. 

Furniture Department. 

New work. Basket, 1; Benches, 4; Chairs, 356; Costumes, 6; Curtain rods, 15; 
Screens, 3; Settees, 6; Shades, 28; Stools, 3; Tables, 137. 

Repair work. Auto curtains, 8; Beam for loom, 1; Bedside tables, 6; Bobbins 
for looms, 8; Chairs, 186; Chiffonier, 1; Clocks, cleaned, 8; Clippers, 1 pr.; Couches, 
reed, 3; Desks, 2; Drawer knobs put on, 25; Graphophones, 9; Knives sharpened, 
8; Looms repaired, 2; Piano stools, 3; Pictures re-hung, 27; Reed rockers, 139; 
Scissors sharpened, 46 pr.; Sewing machines, 13; Shades, 81; Step ladder, 1; Swabs, 
30; Tables, 10; Trunk box, 1; Victrolas, 4. 



Products of Farm 1927. 

Milk 663,093.7 lbs. © $.0465 $30,833.86 

Eggs 1,635 doz. @ .75 1,226.25 

Eggs 1,670 10/12 doz. @ .45 751.88 

Asparagus 17134 lbs. @ .14 23.98 

Beans, dry 5,851 lbs. @ .06 351.08 

Beans, shell 2,1813^ lbs. @ .05 109.08 



12 



P.D. 70 



Beans, string 
Beets 

Beet greens 
Cabbage 
Carrots 
Carrots, stock 
Cauliflower 
Celery- 
Chard 
Corn, sweet 
Cucumbers 
Dandelions 
Endive 
Lettuce 
Mangles 
Onions 
Parsnips 
Peas, green 
Peppers 
Potatoes 
Potatoes 
Pumpkins 
Radishes 
Rhubarb 
Scullions 
Spinach 

Squash, summer 
Squash, winter 
Tomatoes 
Turnips 
Turnips, stock 
Turnip greens 



10,725M 
46,2253^ 
2,9013^ 
23,695 

83,617M 
5,520 

111^ 
3,799 

24,971M 
16,389 
6,781 
165 



lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
86 lbs. 
1,639M lbs. 
38,316 lbs. 
12,681 lbs. 
4,2123^ lbs. 
5,187 lbs. 

2393^ lbs. 
1,664 
201,761 

14,311M 
1653^ 
3,4153^ 

10,356M 

1,1353^ 

5,9023^ 
11,252 M lbs. 
26,415 M lbs. 
58,321 14 lbs. 

4,668 lbs. 
691 lbs. 



lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 



.07 

.0125 

.04 

.0075 

.0225 

.00325 

.04 

.045 

.03 

.025 

.03 

.08 

.04 

.02 

.00325 

.035 

.03 

.09 

.04 

.02 

.0175 

.01 

.02 

.01 

.015 

.05 

.015 

.0225 

.02 

.0125 

.00325 

.02 



750.77 
577.82 
116.06 
177.71 
1,881.40 

17.94 
4.47 
170.96 
749.14 
409.73 
203.43 

13.20 
3.44 

32.80 
124.53 
443.84 
126.38 
466.83 
9.58 

33.28 
3,530.82 
143.11 
3.31 

34.16 
155.35 

56.78 

88.54 
253.18 
528.32 
729.02 

15.17 

13.82 



Apples, No. 1 

Apples, No. 2 

Apples, cider 

Blackberries 

Blueberries 

Currants 

Gooseberries 

Grapes 

Peaches 

Pears 

Raspberries 
Strawberries 



20,249 lbs. 
15,6733^ lbs. 
8,270 lbs. 

7221^ lbs. 
5,902 lbs. 
1033^ lbs. 
43 H lbs. 
92 lbs. 
323^ lbs. 
13,0823^ lbs. 
6083^ lbs. 
5,301% lbs. 



.025 

.0175 

.005 

.24 

.07 

.07 

.07 

.07 

.02 

.0175 

.30 

.16 



506.23 
274.28 
41.35 
173.40 
413.14 
7.25 
3.05 
6.44 
.65 
228.94 
182.55 
848.28 



Beef, steer 

Beef, cow 

Veal 

Pork 

Chicken 

Fowl 

Broilers 



2,057 lbs. 

12,629 lbs. 

1,4171^ lbs. 

38,9463^ lbs. 

648 lbs. 

1,7533^ lbs. 

1,2891^ lbs. 



.17 
.13 
.22 
.15 
.40 
.36 
.43 



349.69 
1,641.77 
311.85 
5,841.98 
259.20 
631.26 
554.49 



P.D. 70 






13 


Turkey- 


3591^ lbs. 


@ .43 


154.59 


Liver 


1,755^ lbs. 


@ .07 


122.89 


xxciy, iNo. J. 




(a^ 99 00 


^,0^4 . ov 


nay, inc<iu.ow 


11 tnn<a 


rffi 14 00 




\Ja\) ol(i<tW 


7 tnn«i 


rS), 12 00 

x^i . VV 


84 00 
0^ . vU 


TT^Ti oil Q rro /^r\TTi 




(a) fi 00 

VSi^ V . \J\J 


1 ^00 Oft 


Whnlp Oaf<? 

VV llUlC WdLB 


16 559 lbs 


@/ 02 


^^1 1 8 
oox . xo 


A If {J If Q crrppn 


3fil4 tons 


fa), 7 00 

1 . \J\J 


9^"=* f^O 




97 tnn«; 


(a), 5 00 


1 QC 00 
100 . Uv 


Clover, green 


631^ tons 


@ 7.00 


442.75 


Oats, green 


293^ tons 


@ 6.50 


191.75 


Manure 


1,204.74 tons 


@ 2.50 


3,011.85 






/2), 07 


21 70 
^ X . 1 u 






(a), ORQ^f^R 
\5f^ .vOt/OtJO 


x«j<j . 00 


Xjumijcr, n<iLivc piiic 


10 ono ft 

X^,VUU 11/. 


rS) 07 


840 00 


Xjumijcr, ntJiTiioLK 




VSf^ • "DO 


Q9K 00 
O^O . Uv 




Q 000 ft 




1 QC 00 

Xi7'0 . Uv 


j-iUmucr, daxi 


Q 000 ft 
OfKfyjyj 11/. 


(a). 07 


91 00 

^XW . Uv 


i^uniocr, niapi6 


Q 000 ft 

0,v/V/U 1X1. 


(n) 07 


91 00 
^lU . uu 


ijumocr, oaK 


A 000 ft 


(n) 07 


980 00 
^ou . uu 


Lumber, birch 


2,500 ft. 


@ .07 


175.00 


Lumber, beech 


806 ft. 


@ .07 


56.42 


Fence Stakes 


400 


@ .05 


20.00 


Fence posts 


60 


@ .25 


15.00 


W OOU. 


1 lu corus 


/?7) 10 00 

yuj/ Xv . vii 


7 100 00 
1 ,xuu . uu 


Sawdust 


13 cords 


@ -1.00 


13.00 


Ice 


1,740 tons 


@ 5.50 


9,570.00 








$85,831.60 



Refobpstation. 

10,000 White Pine seedlings set. 
5,000 Norway Spruce seedlings set. 



Farm Activitijes. 
Stones removed from fields, 886 tons. 
Rock excavated, 1,140 tons. 
Earth excavated, 2,609 cu. yds. 
Road rebuilt, 1,566 sq. yds. 
Road resurfaced, 2,744 4/9 sq. yds. 
Walks resurfaced, 561 sq. yds. 
Grading, 3,923 sq. yds. 
Land cleared of underbrush, 65 acres 
Land cleared for fields, S14 acres. 
New road built, 8,805 K sq. yds. 



Preserves, Pickles, etc. 
Apple jelly, 128 tumblers; Apple, crab, jelly, 23^ tumblers; Beans, shell, 57 qts.; 



14 



P.D. 70 



Beans, string, 266^ qts.; Beets, pickled, 146 qts.; Beets, canned, 11 qts.; Beet 
greens, canned, 20 qts.; Blackberries, 147 qts.; Blackberry jelly, 24 tumblers; 
Blueberries, 652 qts.; Catsup, 3 qts.; Carrots, qts.; Chili sauce, 26 qts.; Chow 
Chow, 25 qts.; Corn, 20 qts.; Cucumbers, 103 qts.; Cucumbers, 1 bbl.; Currant 
jelly, 40 tumblers; Dandelions, 58 qts.; Gooseberry jelly, 15 tumblers; Grape jelly, 
131 tumblers; Marmalade, 2 qts.; Mincemeat, 138 qts.; Mustard Pickle, 38 qts.; 
Onions, 4 qts.; Peaches, 22 qts.; Peas, 192 qts.; Pepper relish, qts.; Pickles, 
mixed, 25 qts.; Picalilli, 372 qts.; Pineapple and strawberry jelly, 19 tumblers.; 
Plums, 2 qts.; Pumpkins, 42 qts.; Raspberries, 151 qts.; Raspberry jam, 2 qts.; 
Raspberry jelly, 27 tumblers; Rhubarb, 1843^ qts.; Strawberries, 330 qts.; Swiss 
chard, 13 qts.; Squash, 20 qts.; Tomatoes, 64^ qts. 

Fruits and Vegetables Canned at the Cannery. 

Apples, 3,508 qts.; Beans, shell, 40 qts.; Beans, string, 6,888 qts.; Blueberries, 
2,880 qts.; Corn, 1,514^ qts.; Pears, 5,060 qts.; Pumpkin, 1,140 qts.; Swiss Chard, 
3,784 qts.; Tomatoes, 6,136 qts. 

5,200 lbs. of hard soap and 199 lbs. of soft soap was made during the year. 



VALUATION 



November 30, 1927. 



Real Estate 



Land, 1,856 acres 
Buildings 



$ 



37,350 00 
1,023,426 01 



$1,060,776 01 



Personal Property 



Travel, transportation and office expenses, 

Food 

Clothing and materials 

Furnishings and household supplies 

Medical and general care 

Heat, light and power 

Farm , 

Garage, stables and grovmds 

Repairs 



$ 



200 00 



8,009 17 
24,338 68 
145,485 25 
5,091 44 
11,180 20 
43,158 67 
10,890 98 
16,513 61 



$264,868 00 



StJMMARY 



Real Estate 

Personal Property, 



$1,060,776 01 
264,868 00 



$1,325,644 01 



P.D. 70 15 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

1927 

To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1927: 

Cash Account 
ReceiiOs 

Board of Patients 228,746 21 

523,746 21 

Personal Services: — 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 121 12 

Sale:— 

Travd, transportation and office expenses (postaee) 19 

Food 2^51 22 

Clothing and materials 327 57 

Farm: — 

Cows and calves 5 00 

Pigs and hogs 36 00 

Hides 185 10 

Sundries 226 10 

Repairs, ordinary, waste and junk 559 61 

Arts and crafts sales 888 77 

Total sales $4,253 46 

Miscdlaneoos : — 

Interest on bank balances ". $779 94 

Rent : 573 76 

Sundries, Com. on tdephone calls 23 33 

$1,377 03 

Total Income. $34,497 82 

Maintenanxe 

Balance from previous year, brought forward S13,272 80 

Appropriations, current year: 

Granted 375,100 00 

Transferred to Foxboro S. H 1,500 00 

$373,600 00 

Total $386,872 80 

Expoiaes (as analyzed belowj 377,489 11 

Balance reverring to Treasury of Commonwealth $9,383 69 

Analjfsis of Expenses 

Personal Services $178,981 82 

Religious Instruction 1,690 84 

Travel, Transportation and Office Expenses 3,520 96 

Food 50,858 01 

Clothing and Materials 11,734 02 

Furnishings and Household Supines 16,295 43 

Medical and General Care 17,069 85 

Heat, Light and Power 38,571 77 

Farm 28,114 83 

Garage, Stable and Grounds 8,684 91 

Repairs, Ordinary 14,079 30 

Repairs and Renewals 7,887 37 

Total expenses for Maintenance 5377,489 11 

Speciai. Appropriations 

Balance December 1, 1926 $56,241 99 

Appropriations for current year 99,050 00 

Total $155,291 99 

Expended during the year (see statemoit below) $130,777 35 

Revioting to Treasury of the Commonwealth 56 65 

130,834 00 



Balance November 30, 1927, carried to next year 



$24,457 99 



16 



P.D. 70 



Object 


Act or Resolve 


Whole 
Amount 


Expended 

During 
Fiscal Year 


Total 
Expended 
to Date 


Balance 
at End 
of Year 


*Alt. in Infirmaries 


Chap. 126, Acts 1923 
Chap. 347, Acts 1925 
Chap. 138, Acts 1927 
Chap. 138, Acts 1927 
Chap. 138 ,Acts 1927 
Chap. 126, Acts 1924 
Chap. 398, Acts 1926 
Chap. 79, Acts 1926 
Chap. 138, Acts 1927 
Chap. 398, Acts 1926 
Chap. 79, Acts 1928 
v^nap. <y, Acts ly^o 
Chap. 79, Acts 1926 


$12,000 00 
4,000 00 
7,000 00 
4,000 00 
12,000 00 
42,000 00 

150,000 00 

1,000 00 
1,500 00 
A An 
4UU UU 

3,850 00 


$2,179 37 
1,136 93 
6,140 48 


$11,965 14 
3,978 21 
6,140 48 


$ 34 86 
21 79 
859 52 
4,000 00 
1,890 50 
5,667 64 

8,875 10 

126 62 
116 67 


*Fire Protection 1925. . . . 

Laundry Machinery 

Add'l Filter Beds 


Employees' Cottage 

Add'l Water Supply 

Bldg. for Semi-Dis. Pts.. . 

Highway Rep.in Wes t. . . 
Coal Trestle 


10,109 50 
488 15 

108.605 81 

789 05 


10,109 50 
36,332 36 

141,124 90 

873 38 
1,383 33 
A f\(\ nci 
4UU UU 

928 06 


Purchase of Land 


A (\f\ fid 

928 06 


Food Conveyors 


2,921 94 




$237,750 00 


$130,777 35 


$213,235 36 


$24,514 64 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with *) 56 65 

Balance carried to next year - 



Total as above $24,457 99 

Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been: At Hospital, 1020.887; Family Care, 59.651 ; 

Total, 1080.538 
Total cost for maintenance, $377,489.11. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $6,718 (52 weeks to year) 

Receipt from sales, $4,253.46. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.075. 

All other institution receipts, $30,244.36. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.538. 

Net weekly per capita $6,105. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GERTRUDE W. PERRY, Treasurer 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association 

PRESCRIBED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 

Table 1. — General Information 

Data correct at end of hospital year November 30, 1927. 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property 

Real estate, including buildings $1,060,776 01 

Personal property 264,868 00 

Total $1,325,644 01 

Total acreage of hospital property owned, 1,856. 
Additional acreage rented, None. 

4. Officers and Employees: 

Actually in Service Vacancies at end 

AT End of Year of Year 

M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Superintendents 1-1 _ _ - 

Assistant psysicians 2 1 3 1 - 1 

Clinical assistants - - - 1 ~ 1 

Total physicians 3 1 4 2 - 2 

Stewards 1 - 1 ~ ' ~ 

Resident dentists - 1 "~ ~ 

Pharmacists - " - 1 ~ 1 

Graduate nurses - 4 4 - - - 

Other nurses and attendants 51 46 97 1 1 2 

Occupational therapists 5 5 10 - - - 

Social workers - 1 1 ~ ~ ~ 

All other oflacers and employees 46 45 91 4 3 7 

Total officers and employees 107 102 209 8 4 12 



P.D. 70 

Table 2. -^Financial Statement 
See Treasurer's Report for data requested under this table. 



18 



P.D. 70 



i 
I' 





> 


Eh' 






OiOtD 1 kS^H 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


(A 

a 
w 






1 


N "-I « 


weoeo 1 N-"-! 1 


1 1 1 CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


V) 

< 


Vol 






«0 1 «5 


;ot-« 1 eo 1 1 


1 1 «TJ< 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 




IZ 








t- 00 eo e<5 N TP 


CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




> 2 
« c 










o 


Pi 








ff> 55 1 »H 1 


N 1 C- !N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 








00 1 00 




i-( I 0> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



00 OS ec C3 1- (J5 1> Tj< lo o lo Tj" -a" ic 

<-H 00 »-( O !C O « ?C rH « >-l IS 

,1 ,_,(M 



OOOOr-lt- 

I OiOOCSOt- 
«5 '-1 5£> i-( .H 

tH,-I OO 



Ci t-00 OJ 

coo t- lo 

«D O 00 "3 



rHOoeo(N 

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i-HO IN 



55 OS t- o 

«00l-Ht> 

^ wocot-eooiiceaeoo i -<i<N i i-ioo osooosot^ o i-i 

rH » iH t- r« lO .-I ea ^ lO OlO ;c —I O TJ" i-H ^ lO 

r-( iHN r-lt-l OO O 




P.D. 70 



19 



Table 4. — Xatirity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions for the 
Year ending September 30, 1927 











Parents of M.axe 


Pa RE NTS OF FEM.U.B 


iSATIVITV 




Patiexts 




Patients 






Patients 














Both 






Both 




Males 


Females 


Total 


Fathers 


Mothers 


Parents 


Fathers 


Mothers 


Parents 


Lmted States. . 


20 


22 


42 i 


14 


15 


11 


15 


14 


12 






4 


6 


3 


2 


2 


6 


7 


6 


En^and 


! 








1 




1 






Finland 


2 


5 




2 


2 


2 


5 


5 


5 


Germany 


1 






1 


1 


1 








Irdand 


\ 


3 




5 


5 


3 


6 


6 


6 


Italy 




1 










1 


1 


1 


Norway 

Russia 


1 






I 


I 


1 








2 






2 


2 


2 








Scotland 




1 




1 






1 


1 


1 


Sweden 


1 






1 


1 


1 








Unascertained . . 














1 


2 




Total 


30 


36 


66 ' 


30 


30 


23 




36 


36 


31 



•Includes Newfoundland. 



20 



P.D. 70 



St 















.2 S c 






















1 










•z 


Unasc 
tainec 


fo 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 II 






SSIO 










.DMI 






1 1 ^ 1 ^ r-( (N eC Tjl N 03 


eo 1 


CO 




< 

a 


15 Ye 
and 0\ 


fo 


1 1 1 1 1 tH N N CO 'H rH rH 


ea 1 


03 




FOR 


^ 


1 1 r-t 1 rH 1 1 THrHrHW 1 




00 


Nao< 


; BE 


'ears 






OJ 


States 


fo 




1 


Iz 








(M 


lEIG 


rED 


w 


tH 






Foi 






fo 














1 




Time i 


u £ 










« c« 

tl <D 


























1 1 rH 1 N N m « ■>* (N eO rH 


03 1 








otal 


fo 


1 1 1 1 rH rH N N eO rH rH rH 


e<i 1 








Eh 








o 








tr' 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH 1 










asce 
ined 


fo 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rH 1 














1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 










Eh 


llll(MI|rH||COI II 








fo 




eg 




5NTAGE 






1 1 1 1 rH 1 1 1 1 1 (M 1 II 


03 


■z 
Pi 


a 




1 1 1 rHrHi-HNN 1 1 N rH I | 


O 


o 
« 


Pari 


reig 


fo 


1 1 1 rHrHrH 1 rH I 1 CJ I II 




nvE 


Fo 




1 1 1 1 1 1 MrH 1 1 1 rH II 




< 






E-I 


1 1 eO 1 NOleOrHrHeOrHrH 


00 1 


U3 
(M 






I 
la 


fo 


1 1 rH 1 (N 1 rHrH 1 CO 1 rH 


03 1 


eg 

rH 






% 




1 1 N 1 1 N(N 1 rH 1 rH 1 


^ 1 


03 








E-" 


1 1 «rHlf503U5T)<rH««DN 


OS 1 


eg 






•ota! 


fo 




Tt< 1 


eg 
eg 










1 1 N 1 rHNTfrHiH I « rH 


lO 1 


o 
eg 






(U 

rt 


E-; 


1 1 rH t- kft X t- lo lo o> eo 


N 1 


«o 
«o 






b£ 

0) 


fo 


1 1 rH rH lO C<I eO lO CO •>* M 


«) 1 


«c 

03 






bfl 

bo 
< 




1 1 05 1 N 05 kO N rH IC rH (C 1 


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03 



'H >>>>>>>,>>>>>.>>>>>>>»rt ^ % 

-rti-Hcgcgeoos-^Tiiicuftoixi 

^ I I I J I I I I I I I _ o 2 



P.D. 70 21 

Tablp 5. — Citizenship of First Admissions for t)ie Year ending September 30, 1927 





Males 


Females 


Total 




21 


22 


43 
6 




4 


2 




5 


12 


17 










Total 


30 


36 


66 







Table 6. — Psychoses of First Admissions for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 



13. 



Traumatic psychoses 

Senile psychoses 

Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 

General paralysis 

Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 

Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 

Psychoses with brain tumor 

Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total* . 
Alcoholic psychoses, total 

(a) Delirium tremens 

(b) Korsakow's psychosis 

(c) Acute hallucinosis 

(d) Other types, acute or chronic 

Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 

Psychoses with pellagra 

Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 

Exhaustion delirium 

Other diseases or conditions 

Manic-depressive psychoses, total 

Manic type 

Depressive type 

Other tyi>es 

Involution melancholia 

Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions 

Epileptic psychoses 

Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 

Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) . . 

Neurasthenic type 

Psychoses with psychopathic personality 

Psychoses with mental deficiency 

Undiagnosed psychoses 

Without psychosis, total 

Mental deficiency without psychosis 



Total. 



M. 



F. 



T. 



M. 


F. 


T. 


4 


5 


— 
9 


4 


1 


5 


CO 1 1 


1 


4 

- 


5 




— 
5 

: 


1 


1 1 1 CO 1 


4 


2 
- 


4 


6 




9 


9 


3 


3 


6 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


5 


1 


3 


4 


2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


30 


36 


66 



Table 7— Race of First Admissions classified idth Reference to Principal PsycJwses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Race 


Total j 

1 


Senile 


With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerosis j 


General 
paralysis 


Alcoholic 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 


6 


5 


11 








2 




2 


1 




1 










2 


6 


8 
8 










1 


1 














French 


3 


5 




















1 




1 




1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




















Irish 


6 


7 


12 


1 


1 


2 








1 




1 












1 


1 


























2 




2 








1 




1 








1 




1 




2 




2 








1 




1 














Scotch 




1 


1 




























8 


6 


14 


1 


2 


3 
3 








1 


1 


2 


3 




3 




1 


4 


5 


1 


2 




















































Total 


30 


36 


66 


4 


5 


9 


4 


1 


5 


3 


1 


4 


5 




5 

































•Includes "North" and "South" and Norwegians Danes and Swedes. 



22 



P.D. 7 



Table 7 — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Continued 



Race 


With 
other 
somatic 
diaseses 


Manic- 
de- 
pressive 


Involu- 
tion 
melan- 
cholia 


Dementia 
praecox 


Paranoia 

and 
paranoid 
conditions 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 








1 




1 




2 


2 




2 


2 








Finnish 




2 


2 


— 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


















2 


2 












1 


1 


German 
















1 


1 














1 


1 




1 


1 




2 


2 








1 




1 






















































































1 




1 
























1 


1 












Mixed 


1 




1 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 
























1 


1 












Total 


1 


3 


4 


2 


4 


6 




9 


9 


3 


3 


6 


1 




2 





























^Includes "North" and "South" fNorwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



Table 7. — Race of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Concluded. 



Race 


Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses 


With 
psycho- 
pathic 
person- 
ality 


With 
mental 
deficiency 


Undiag- 
nosed 
psychoses 


Without 
psychosis 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 


1 




1 




1 


1 














1 




1 




1 




1 
















1 


1 








French 








1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 




1 


1 


German 




































1 


1 




1 


1 


2 




2 


















1 


1 


























































































Sctoch 
































Mixed 




1 


1 




































1 


1 




















Total 


2 


3 


5 


1 


3 


4 


2 




3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 



^Includes "North" and "South" 



fNorwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



P.D. 70 



Table 8. — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


20-24 
years 


25-29 
years 


30-34 
years 


35-39 
years 


40-44 
years 


M. 


P. 


T. 


"I. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M, 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F 


T. 




4 




5 




9 
































With cerebral arterio- 










































4 


1 


5 




































3 


1 


4 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


— 




— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


Alcoholic 


5 


- 


5 






















1 




1 


1 


- 


1 


With other somatic dis- 










































1 


3 


4 


I 




- 


1 


- 


- 












1 


1 




- 




Manic-depressive 


2 


4 


6 


















2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


Involution melancholia . . 




9 


9 


















1 


1 










2 


2 




3 


3 


6 


1 




1 


2 










2 


2 














Paranoia and paranoid 










































1 


1 


2 


































Psychoneuroses and neu- 










































2 


3 


5 




























1 


1 


2 


With psychopathic per- 








































sonality 


1 


3 


4 
















1 




1 














With mental deficiency. . 


2 


1 


3 
















1 




1 














Undiagnosed psychoses . . 


1 




2 






























1 


1 


Without psychosis 


1 


1 


2 


1 






1 




1 


1 




















Total 


30 


36 


66 


3 




1 


4 




1 


1 


2 


5 


7 


3 


2 


5 


4 


4 


8 



Table 8. — Age of First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
for the Year ending September SO, 1927 — Continued 



Psychoses 


45-49 
years 


50-54 
years 


55-59 
years 


60-64 
years 


65-69 
years 


70 years 
and over 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


















1 


1 








1 




1 


3 


4 


7 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 






















2 




2 




1 


1 


2 




2 


General paralysis 






1 


1 


1 






























Alcoholic 






















3 




3 














With other somatic diseases . 












1 












1 


1 




















1 


1 












































1 






3 


3 




1 


1 




1 


1 








Dementia preacox 


1 






1 


























1 




1 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 














































1 


1 


1 






























Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 




1 


2 
















1 


1 














With psychopathic person- 








































ality 












1 












1 


1 










1 


1 


With mental deficiency 


1 




1 


2 
































Undiagnosed psychoses 
















1 




1 




















Without psychosis. . .* 








































Total 


3 




5 


8 


2 


3 


5 


1 


4 


5 


5 


4 


9 


1 


2 


3 


6 


5 


11 



24 



P.D. 70 



Table 9. — Degree of Education of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


Illiterate 


Reads and 
writes* 


Common 
School 


iVl. 


r . 




iVl. 


r . 


1 . 


Ayr 
JVl. 


r . 


rrt 
1 . 


TUT 


r . 


1 . 


Senile 


4 


5 


9 














3 


4 


7 




4 


1 


5 








1 


1 


2 


2 




2 




3 


1 


4 














1 


1 


2 




5 




5 


1 




1 








2 




2 


With other somatic diseases 


1 


3 


4 










1 






2 


2 


Manic-depressive 


2 


A 


6 










2 




2 


2 


4 


Involution melancholia 




9 


9 










3 






4 


4 


Dementia praecox 


3 


3 


6 








1 






2 


1 


3 




1 


1 


2 














1 


1 


2 




2 


3 


5 










1 




1 


1 


2 




1 


3 


4 














1 


2 


3 




2 


1 


3 


1 




1 










1 


1 




1 


1 


2 










1 












1 


1 


2 














1 


1 


2 


Total 


30 


36 


66 


2 




2 


3 


9 


12 


16 


20 


36 



Table 9. — Degree of Education of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Pscyhoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Concluded. 



Psychoses 


High 
School 


College 


Unascer- 
tained 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




1 


1 


2 














With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


1 




1 














General paralysis 


2 




2 
















1 


















With other somatic diseases 


1 










































1 












1 


1 






1 






1 


1 








Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




















Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 








1 


1 








With psychopathic personality 




1 
















With mental deficiency 


1 


















Undiagnosed psychoses 














1 




1 






















Total 


8 


4 


12 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 



P.D. 70 



25 



Table 10. — Environment of First Admissions classified urith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 



Senile 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis ... 

General paralysis 

Alcoholic 

With other somatic diseases 

Manic-depressive 

Involution melancholia 

Dementia praecox 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions. 

Psychoneursoes and neuroses 

With psychopathic personality. . . 

With mental deficiency 

Undiagnosed psychoses 

Without psychosis 



Total 



Total 



M. F. T 



30 36 66 29 34 



Urban 



M. 



63 



Rural 



M. 



Table 11. — Economic Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


: De- 
pendent 


Marginal 


i 

1 Comfortable 


j Unascer- 
tained 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




4 


5 


9 




1 


1 




2 


2 


4 




5 




1 


1 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis. . . 


4 


1 


5 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 








General paralysis 


3 


1 


4 








1 


1 


2 


2 




2 










5 




5 


1 




1 


4 




4 














With other somatic diseases. . . . 




3 


4 












1 




3 


3 










2 


4 


6 








2 


3 


5 




1 


1 












9 


9 










3 


3 




6 


6 








Dementia praecox 


3 


3 


6 


1 




1 


2 




3 




2 


2 








Paranoia and paranoid condi- 


































1 


1 


2 














1 


1 


2 








Psychoneuroses and neuroses . . . 


2 


3 


5 










3 


3 


2 




2 








With psychopathic personality . 


1 


3 


4 










2 


2 


1 


1 


2 








With mental deficiency 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 




1 
















Undiagnosed psychoses 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 
















1 


1 


Without psychosis 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 














Total 


30 


3. 


66 


7 


1 


8 


12 


17 


29 


11 


16 


27 




2 


2 



26 



P.D. 70 



Ta,ble 12. — Use of Alc(^hol by First Admissions classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


Abstinent 


Temperate 


Intem- 
perate 


. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. I 


\ T. 


Senile 




c 
O 


q 






g 


3 














4 


1 


5 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 








3 


1 


4 








2 


1 


3 


1 - 


- 1 




5 




5 














5 


5 




1 


3 


4 


1 


3 


4 














2 


4 


6 


2 


2 


4 




2 


2 










9 


9 
6 




8 


8 




1 


1 








3 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 






F&r&uoisi 3-11(1 p3,rsiioi(i conditions 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 








2 


3 


5 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 








1 


3 


4 




3 


3 








1 - 


- 1 




2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 










1 


1 


1 - 


- 1 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 












Total 


30 


36 


66 


10 


26 


36 


12 


10 


22 


8 - 


- 8 



Table 13. — Marital Condition of First Admissions classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Divorced 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Senile 


4 


5 


9 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


4 


5 








With cerebral arteriosclerosis . . . 


4 


1 


5 








1 




1 


3 


1 


4 










3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 
















5 




5 


3 




3 


1 




1 


1 




1 








With other somatic diseases .... 


1 


3 


4 


1 




1 




3 


3 
















2 


4 


6 


2 


1 


3 




2 


2 










1 


1 






9 


9 










7 


7 




2 


2 








Dementia praecox 


3 


3 


6 


3 


2 


5 




1 


1 














Paranoia and paranoid conditions 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 


1 














Psychoneuroses and neuroses . . . 


2 


3 


5 








2 


3 


5 














With psychopathic personality. . 


1 


3 


4 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 














With mental deficiency 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 




1 


1 














Undiagnosed psychoses 


1 


1 


2 










1 


1 


1 




1 








Without psychosis 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 




















Total 


30 


36 


66 


15 


6 


21 


9 


22 


31 


6 


7 


13 




1 


1 



Table 14. — Psychoses of Readmissions for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Males 


Females 


Total 






1 


1 




1 


1 


2 






1 


1 


Dementia praecox 




4 


4 






1 


1 






1 


1 


Total 


1 


9 


10 



P.D. 70 



27 



Table 15. — Discharges of Patients classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
and Condition on Discharge for the Year ending September 30, 1927. 



Psychoses 


Total 


Re- 
covered 


Improved 


Unim- 
proved 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




3 




3 


3 




3 














With other somatic diseases 


2 


3 


5 


1 


1 


2 




2 


2 


1 




1 




9 


7 


16 


2 


4 


6 


5 


2 


7 


2 


1 


3 




4 


6 


10 








3 


4 


7 


1 


2 


3 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


2 


1 


3 








2 


1 


3 








With mental deficiency 


2 


2 


4 








1 


2 


3 


1 




1 


Without psychosis 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


Total 


25 


20 


45 


7 


5 


12 


12 


11 


23 


6 


4 


10 



Table 16. — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Causes of Death 


Total 


Senile 


With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerois 


General 
paralysis 


Alcoholic 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Epidemic, Endemic and Infectious 
Diseases 






























Tuberculosis of the respiratory system 


7 


2 


9 
























General Diseases not inciuaea in Class 1 






























Cancer and other malignant tumors . . 


1 




1 




























2 


2 
























Diseases of the Nervous System 






























Cerebral hemorrhage, appoplexy .... 


4 


2 


6 






3 




3 








1 




1 




4 




4 












4 




4 








Epilepsy 


1 




1 
























Other diseases of the nervous system . 




1 


1 
























Diseases of the Circulatory System 
































8 


12 


20 


3 7 


10 


1 




1 








2 




2 


Other diseases of the heart 


1 


1 


2 
























Diseases of the Respiratory System 
































1 




1 
























Lobar pneumonia 




2 


2 
























Diseases of the Digestive System 






























Hernia and intestinal obstruction . . . 


1 




1 
























Other diseases of digestive system 






























(cancer and tuberciJosis excepted) 




1 


1 
























External Causes. 






























Suicide 




1 


1 
























Total 


28 


24 


52 


3 7 


10 


4 






4 




4 


3 




3 



28 



P.D. 70 



Table 16. — Causes of Deaths of Patients classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Concluded 



Psychoses 


Mani 
depress 


sive 


In- 
volution 
melan- 
cholia 


Dementia 
praceox 


Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses 


With 
psycho- 
pathic 
person- 
ality 


==A11 other 
psychtsis 




M 


F, 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


.T 




F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F . 


T. 


Epidemic Endemic and In 

fectious Diseases 
Tuberculosis of the respira- 
tory system 

General Diseases not included 

in Class 1 
Cancer and other malignant 
tumors 






- 








6 
1 


2 


8 
1 


- 




- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


- 


Other general diseases 

Diseases of the Nervous 
System 

Cerebral hemorrhage, apop- 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


_ 




_ 


_ 


1 


1 
















1 




General paralysis of the in- 
































Epilepsy 
































1 


- 




Other diseases of the nerv- 


































1 




Diseases of the Circulatory 
System 

Endocarditis & myocarditis. 
Other diseases of the heart. 
Diseases of the tiespiratory 
System 

Brochopneumonia 


1 

X 


1 


1 
2 


- 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 














1 


1 




Lobar pneumonia 




1 


1 










1 


1 




















Diseases of the Digestive 
System 

Hernia and intestinal ob- 














1 




1 




















Other diseases of digestive 
system (cancer and tuber- 
ulosis excepted) 
















1 


1 




















External Causes. 






















1 


1 














Total 


2 


4 


6 




2 


2 


9 


7 


16 




1 


1 


1 




1 


2 


3 


5 



































^Includes group 22, "without psychoseis." 



Table 17. — Age of Patients at Time of Death classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


20-24 
years 


25-29 
years 


30-34 
years 


35-39 
years 


40-44 
years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Traumatic 


1 




1 
































Senile 


3 


7 


10 
































With cerebral arterio- 
sclerosis 


4 




4 
































Gener .l paralysis 

Alco-ciic 


4 
3 




4 
3 














1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


With other somaiic dis- 
eases 




2 


2 
































Manic-depressive 


2 


4 


6 
































Involution melancholia. . 
'■"ementia praecox 


9 


2 
7 


2 
16 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 


1 


Psychoneuroses and neu- 




1 


1 
































With psychopathic per- 
sonality 


1 




1 
































Undiagnosed psychoses . . 
Without psychosis 


1 


1 


1 
1 
































Total 


.8 


24 


52 






1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 

































P.D. 70 



29 



Table 17. — Age of Patients at Time of Death classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Concluded. 



Psychoses 


45-49 
years 


50-54 
years 


55-59 
years 


60-64 
years 


65-69 
years 


70 years 
and over 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. P. 


T. 




























































1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 6 


9 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 








2 




2 








1 - 












1 




1 






































2 




2 














1 - 


1 


With other somatic diseases. 
























1 








- 1 


1 


Manic-depressive 










1 


1 














1 


2 


3 




2 


Involution melancholia 




























1 


1 


- 1 


1 


Dementia praecox 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 




1 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 
































With psychopathic person- 




































ality 














1 




1 


















Undiagnosed psychoses 
































- 1 


1 


Without psychosis 














1 




1 


















Total 


2 


1 


3 


3 


2 


5 


6 




6 


3 


3 


6 


1 


4 


5 


6 11 


17 



Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 



Psychoses 


Total 


Less than 
1 month 


1-2 
months 


4-7 
months 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




1 




1 






















3 


7 


10 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 




4 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 






General paralysis 


4 




4 








2 




2 


1 




1 


Alcoholic 


3 




3 


1 




1 


















2 


2 










1 


1 










2 


4 


6 
























2 


2 




















Dementia praecox 


9 


7 


16 




















Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 










1 


1 








With psychopathic oersonality 


1 




1 




















Undiagnosed psychoses 

Without psychosis 




1 


1 




1 


1 














1 




1 




















Total 


-28 


24 


52 


3 


2 


5 


4 


3 


7 


2 




2 



30 



P.D. 70 



Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 — Ccntinued 



Psychoses 


8-12 
months 


1-2 
years 


3-4 
years 


5-6 
years 


7-8 
years 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Traumatic 




1 1 I. 1 1 1 1 1 I- 1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Cj6iiGral paral3^sis ■ •■••••>-••••>-••>• 

Alcoholic 

With other somatic diseases 

Manic-depressive 


1 

2 
2 


1 
1 


1 

3 
1 
2 




1 


1 








1 




1 




1 




1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


With psychopathic personality 








1 




1 






















































1 


1 


2 


7 


4 


11 


1 


1 


2 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 



Table 18. — Total Duration of Hospital Life of Patients dying in Hospital classified 
according to Principal Psychoses for the Year ending September 30, 1927 Concluded. 



Psychoses 


9-10 
years 


11-12 
years 


13-14 
years 


15-19 
years 


20 years 
and over 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




1 




1 






















































1 


1 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 






















































































1 


1 
























































1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 






1 


1 




























1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


3 


3 


6 


































With psychopathic personality 




















































1 


































1 










2 


2 


4 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


5 


8 



Table 19. — Family Care Department 



Male 



Female 



Remaining September 30, 1926 

Admitted within the year 

Whole number of cases within year 

Dismissed within year 

Returned to Institution 

Discharged 

Escaped 

Dismissed to Visit 

Died 

Remaining September 30, 1927 

Supported by State 

Self-supporting 

Number of (Afferent persons within the year 

Number of different persons admitted 

Number of di^erent persons dismissed 

Daily average number 

Supported by State 

Seli-supporting 



10 
8 
2 
13 
14 
10 
9.319 
2.019 
7.300 



46 
40 
6 
53 
43 
41 
50.878 
45.212 
5.666 



Public Document 



No. 70- 



®lfF filommnttmpalllj nf iSaaBartruBrttfi 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1928 



Department of Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Doctmext approved bt the Commission on Administration and Finance 
500 12-'29. Order 7625. 



APR 151930 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 
Frederic A. Washburn, ]M.D., Chairman, B^^n." 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester. 
Thomas R. P. Gibb, Rockport. 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner. 
Mrs. Alice M. Spring, Fitchburg. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg. 
George A. Marsh-^ll, Fitchburg. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
Ch.\rles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
LoNNiE 0. F-^RAR, a\I.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
Harold K. M-^shall, ]M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mary A. Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. ]Marr, Steward. 
Hall C. Bow:\l\n, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
Ethel yi. Hall, Social Service Worker. 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES. 

Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
David Profit, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Nielson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
John H. Jenkins, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Edward C. Corey, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS. 

Gladys C. Ripley, R.N., Woinen's Infirmary. 

Alton J. Winchenbach, Me7i's Infirmary. 

Ila W. Kennedy, R.N., Hospital. 

Elvira I. Winchenbach, R.N., Treatment Building. 

Matrons. Colonies. Supervisors. 

Mrs. Gladys Bennett Belcher Cottage Walter Bennett 

Mrs. M\Ttie Sprague Hillcrest Cottage Streeter G. Sprague 

Mrs. Mertie Morse Valley Cottage Fred Morse 

Mrs. Minnie Larkin Gardner Cottage Herbert J. Larkin 

Mrs. Beren Morse Westminster Cottage Merrill Morse 

Mrs. I!^1?tbel Sanderson Fair^-iew Cottage 

Miss Bernadette Brunette Overlook Cottage 

Miss Helen G. Batchelder Highland Cottage 

^ Wachusett Cottage Fletcher C. Mann 

RELIGIOUS SERATLCES. 
Rev. jAiiES T. Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in turn, Protestant 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 
To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees of the Gardner State Colony present their twenty-sixth annual 
report. Death has taken from their number Mrs. Alice M. Spring. She was one 
of the original Board of Trustees of the Colony, appointed in 1901. The following 
resolutions were adopted by the Trustees: 



P.D. 70 ' 3 

TF/iereas; It has pleased God to call from this life Alice M. Spring, late 
a trustee of the Gardner State Colony, one of its original trustees and by- 
successive appointments in that office in the service of the Commonwealth 
for more than twenty-six years, a woman of high Christian character, 
uncompromising in the performance of duty, tender and solicitous of im- 
pulse, self-sacrificing, kindly, just and humane. 

Be it Resolved: That by the death of Alice M. Spring the Commonwealth 
has lost a high-minded, earnest and useful pubHc servant, the Gardner 
State Colony a valuable and efficient officer and its Board of Trustees a 
delightful co-worker and friend, and 

Be it Further Resolved: That these resolutions be spread upon the records 
of the trustees of the Gardner State Colony and a copy sent to her be- 
reaved family as a memorial to Alice M. Spring and as an expression of the 
sense of sorrow and of loss felt by the trustees at her passing. 

Governor Fuller appointed ^liss Grace Nichols, of Boston, a Trustee for Mrs. 
Spring's uncompleted term. 

It is satisfactory to record the great improvement in our facilities for the care 
of patients given by the new hospital building. By means of this hospital and the 
building for the care of disturbed women the infirmary and central dormitory for 
women have been relieved of noise and distressing sights^ so that it is again suited 
to the purposes for which it was erected. 

Similar construction to permit a like rehef for the men is urgently needed and 
the Trustees are delighted to note that this project for a building for intensive 
treatment of men has been approved by the central authorities and that the 
Legislature has been asked for the necessary appropriation. To complete this 
program a hospital for men should soon follow, a building similar to the one now 
used for both sexes. 

Construction in 1928: 1. Additions to filter beds. 2. Two officers' bungalows. 
3. Repairs to road to Westminster. These jobs are practically completed. 

Two of our Colony groups are in old farmhouses which are now unsuitable. 
These should be replaced. Other Colony groups should be established and the 
original plan carried out and further developed. 

Your Trustees have year by year asked for a Superintendent's house. They 
still feel that this is very important and urge that it be built soon. 

The continuous wooden stable, hay storage, cow barn and dairy present a 
situation of menace. In case of fire it is highly improbable that the animals could 
be removed alive. The herd of cows is a valuable one. The Trustees are glad to 
note the probability that a new dairy building will be allowed this year. Something 
more should be done to lessen the fire risk. The best way is to build a new fire- 
proof cow tie-up building separate from stable and haymows. This separation 
should be made for sanitary reasons also. 

The morale of the State Colony is high. There is a spirit of contentment among 
patients and of service among officers and employees which is gratifying. Such a 
spirit is found only in well-managed institutions. The Trustees are appreciative 
of the Superintendent, Dr. Charles E. Thompson. Attention is invited to his 
report, appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Amie H. Coes, Secretary, Thomas R. P. Gibb, 

Thomas H. Shea, George A. Marshall, 

Owen A. Hoban, Grace Nichols, 

Frederic A. Washburn, Chairman. 

January 15, 1929. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

The report of the operation of the Gardner State Colony for the statistical year 
ending September 30, and for the fiscal year ending November 30, 1928, is respect- 
fully submitted. This is the twenty-sixth annual report. 



4 



P.D. 70 



Movement of Population. 
At the close of the statistical year 1927 there were under care 1,164 patients as 
follows: 

Actually \\dthin the hospital, 1,069; in family care, 56; on visit to their homes, 
33; on escape, 6. 12 additional patients in family care were under our supervision 
but on the books of the Department of Mental Diseases for financial support. The 
total number in family care under our super^dsion was 68. 

During the year 150 have been admitted and 119 were discharged, 48 have died. 
Of those admitted 94 were admitted by first admission; 18 re-admitted; 38 received 
by transfer to relieve overcrowding in other hospitals. 

The diagnosis of mental disease in those 94 admitted for the first time was: 
senile psychosis, 13; psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis, 10; general paralysis, 
4; alcoholic psychosis, 7; psychosis with somatic disease, 6; psychosis due to drugs, 
1; manic depressive psychosis, 12; involution melancholia, 3; dementia prsecox, 12; 
paranoia or paranoid condition, 1; psychoneurosis and neurosis, 2; psychosis 
with psychopathic personality, 2 ; psychosis with mental deficiency, 1 ; undiagnosed 
psychosis, 2; without a psychosis-epilepsy, 1; mental deficiency, 5; psychopathic 
personality, 3; not insane, 9. 

The average ages of those admitted for the first time was: 20 years or less, 4; 
20 to 30 years, 8; 30 to 40 years, 16; 40 to 50 j^ears, 26; 50 to 60 years, 10; 60 to 70 
years, 9; 70 to 80 j^ears, 17; over 80 years, 4. 

The probable cause assigned in the 94 first admissions was: unknown, 23; 
psychopathic personality, 8; alcohol, 7; arteriosclerosis, 21; syphilis, 4; congenital, 
5; heredity, 7; worry, 3; physical disease, 14; drugs, 1; somatic disease, 1. 

The causes of death in 48 were: Erysipelas, 1; pulmonary tuberculosis, 2; septi- 
caemia, 1; malignant tumor, 5; pernicious anemia, 1; cerebral hemorrhage, 9; general 
paralysis, 2; arteriosclerosis, 3; penumonia, 2; endocarditis and myocarditis, 15; 
suicide, 1; intestinal obstruction, 2; fractured skull, 1; chronic endocarditis, 2; 
multiple sclerosis, 1. 

Family Care. 

Suitable patients, usually those of middle life, or beyond, have been placed in 
selected homes in the community as in former years. The number so placed has 
been limited because of an insufficient appropriation with which to pay the board 
of those who are not seK-supporting and it became necessary the last two months 
of the year to transfer 12 of these patients to the books of the Department of 
Mental Diseases rather than remove them from their homes to the Colony. The 
cost of caring for patients in families away from the hospital is so much less ($4 per 
week) that it would seem unwise to limit an appropriation for this purpose. The 
family care system works well and the number so cared for should be increased. 

All homes have been visited by me recently and while many of them lack con- 
veniences and suggest much to be desired and in several instances are very primitive, 
the patients quite universally expressed themselves as satisfied and preferred the 
home care they were receiving to that given at the Colony. This suggests that the 
type of patients so placed are now living under conditions more like those they 
were formerly accustomed to and they prefer them even though they are lacking 
the facilities of the hospital. 

Medical supervision given to these patients cannot be such as that given at the 
hospital and it has been necessarj^, following physical examination, to return 
several from family care because of high blood pressure, advanced age, etc. 

I have to report one sudden death in family care due to cardiac disease. 

Out-Patient Department. 

In the Out-Patient Department during the year there were seen as follows: 
In consultation, 39; at Clinic, 16; at the Colony, 11. 

During the year there were examined 139 children in Public Schools in the 
twelve towns in our district as follows: Athol, 15; Dana, 1; Fitchburg, 14; Gardner, 
12; GiU, 5; Greenwich, 2; Orange, 1; PhiUipston, 2; Royalston, 13; Templeton, 49; 
Baldwin ville, 16; Winchendon, 11. 

The findings from the examination of these 139 children were: Feeble minded, 
52; borderline, 50; dull, 23; normal, 13; not reported, 1. 

A provision has now been made for the employment of a full time Social Worker 



P.D. 70 5 

whose services are badty needed. As soon as a suitable person can be found it will 
be possible to do much more follow-up work than has been done this year, but the 
difficulty is in finding Social Workers who are able and willing to do the work 
necessary. 

The General Health 
of patients has been good during the yesiT, but the general hospital service has been 
unusually active due to the larger and ever increasing number of elderly and infirm 
both of the resident population and new admissions. There is a very decided 
tendencj^ in recent j^ears and apparently it is increasing, to commit elderly people 
who are difficult to care for at home. The time is close at hand w^hen larger ac- 
commodations for the care of the sick and infirm will be mandatory. 

There has been no general outbreak of any contagious diseases. There was one 
case of Scarlet Fever in an officer. Re-vaccination of all patients and employees 
has been completed this year. Immunization against Tj'phoid Fever is given to 
all newly admitted patients and to all emploj^ees upon beginning work and this 
immunization is repeated at intervals of five years. 

A report of each and every minor conflict and injury is required and there has 
been an increased number of these during the year due primarily to overcrowding, 
but conflicts of a serious nature have been few. One patient feU in a bathroom 
receiving a fracture of the skull from which he later died. I have to report one 
suicide, strangulation by hanging. 

During the year there were 15 Industrial Accidents but none of these were of 
a serious nature and in two cases only was loss of time necessary and the amount 
of time lost was but five days. 

Treatment of general paralysis by arsenical preparations has been actively 
continued but the majorit}" of our cases are so far advanced when received that 
we cannot report very encouraging results because arsenical preparations in ad- 
vanced cases of general paralysis have but little effect. Improvement may be seen, 
but cures are rarelj" obtained. A number of cases of Erysipelas have occurred but 
isolation of each case confined it to the individual. We have no provision for the 
segregation of the Tubercular except for a small group at the Hospital Building 
where those from whom there is danger of spreading it are treated. Those from 
whom there is no expectoration are perhaps properly distributed for the present 
in our colonies where the patients are largely out of doors each day throughout 
the year. 

Surgical. 

The following surgical operations have been performed either by members of 
our Staff or by the consulting surgeon, A. F. LoweU, M.D., of Gardner: abdominal 
exploration, 4; remoA^al of breast, 1; removal of both breasts, 1; appendectomy, 2; 
herniotomy, 2; removal of growth in abdomen, 1; uterine currettage, 1; perineor- 
rhaphy, 1 ; hysterectomy, 2 ; removal of epithelioma of chin, 1 ; removal of ovarian 
cyst and cancerous tissue, 1 ; incision of ischiorectal abscess, 1 ; removal of eye — 
sarcoma, 1 ; appendectomy and ovariotomy, 1 ; tonsils and adenoids, 2. 

The results of such operations have been: complete recovery, 9; relieved, 9; 
died, 4. 

Dentistry. 

The Dental Department has bee^ under the direction of J. Herbert Maycock, 
D.M.D., with a full time assistant throughout the year. The following is the work 
doneinthis department: — Examinations, 2,199; Prophylaxis, 1,896; Fillings, 938; 
amalgam, 669, cement, 42, synthetic, 52, gutta percha, 175. Extractions under 
local anaesthetic, 557; extractions under general anaesthetic, 7. Post-operative 
treatments, 88. Minor surgical operations, 107: — Abscesses, 94; crowns removed, 
3; corrected occlusions, 9; irrigated pus pockets, 1. Root canal treatment, 155; 
root canal fillings, 11. Treatments, 906: — Pyorrhea, 500; gingevitis, 200; Vin- 
cent's angina, 167; hypersensitive cementum and dentin, 22; inflamed gum and 
cheek, 10; canker, 2; pulpitis, 4; labrium fraeium, 1. Plates made, 18; plates re- 
paired, 14; plates adjusted, 33; bridges made, 1; bridges removed, 6; gold inlay — 
made and inserted, 7; gold shell crowns, 4; microscopic smears, 1; X-rays, 22. 



6 P.D. 70 

Hydrotherapy. 

It is worthy of note that in one year from the time of occupancy of the new 
Treatment Building for women, over 10,000 hydrotherapeutic treatments were 
given. This building has already demonstrated its value. The day of restraint 
and seclusion and control by opiates has passed but disturbed conditions have 
necessarily to be controlled, and hydrotherapy is the method in vogue. There 
is a tendency, no doubt, to overdo hydrotherapeutic treatment as other methods 
have been overdone in the past. The only relief from this that I can see is to 
pro\'ide out-of-door space, properly enclosed, to which the moderately disturbed 
patients may have access and enjoy out-of-door freedom throughout the better 
months of the j^ear. Such an out-of-door space is urgently needed, and I believe 
that we should make plans for this at once. It seems to me that the continued 
use of hydrotherapy and the restriction of patients within buildings only increases 
the need of hydrotherapy rather than lessening it. 

The following tables show kinds of treatment, the number of different patients 
treated, and the number of hours given: 

Male. Female. Total. 



Saline baths . . . . . 

Salt glows . . . . . 

Electric light bath . . . . 
Tub shampoo and hair shampoo 

Needle spray . . . . . 

Fan douche . . . . . 

Pail douche . . . . . 

Continuous bath . . . . 

Wet sheet pack . . . . 

Total number of treatments: 

Saline bath . . . . . 

Salt glow 

Tub shampoo and hair shampoo 

Needle spray . . . . . 

Fan douche . . . . . 

Pail douche . . . . . 

Electric light bath . . . . 

Rain douche . . . . . 

Continuous bath . . . . 

Wet sheet pack . . . . 
Number of hours — continuous bath 
Number of hours — wet sheet pack 



13 


27 


40 


7 


6 


13 


4 


2 


6 


24 


29 


53 


23 


32 


55 


23 


32 


55 





1 


1 


19 


100 


119 


12 


62 


74 



283 404 687 

125 98 223 

268 327 595 

771 951 1,722 

706 838 1,544 

23 23 

103 66 169 

500 419 919 

351 6,963 7,314 

46 4,690 4,736 

987 20,480 21,467 

141 14,376 14,518 



Physical Therapy. 
The physical-therapy room established last year has been very active throughout 
this year. There were 289 different persons treated, and 4,793 treatments were 
given. The whole number of times treated was 2,893 representing an average of 
10 treatments to each person. The number and forms of treatments given are 
as follows: 

Number treated by high frequency: diathermy, 87; oudin, 10; auto-condensation, 
15; non-vacuum, 19. 

Number treated by vibration, 3; massage, 23; oscillation, 13; infra-red, 148; ultra- 
violet W. C, 55; ultra-violet A. C, 105. 

Number treated by Morse wave generator: Sine wave, 36; Galvanism, 9; Pul- 
sation direct, 10. 

Results seen in the various conditions treated are: arteriosclerosis and high 
blood pressure, fair; sprained muscles, excellent; skin diseases, good; infections and 
varicose ulcers, good; paralysis, slight beneficial results have been seen. In the 
treatment of coryza, anemia, bronchitis and general debihty the results have been 
excellent. In constipation, fair; fallen arches, fair. 

It is too soon to judge of the results as to their permanency but of special note 
is the fact that in the use of physical-therapy patients feel that much is being done 
for them and the mental effect upon them is apparently considerable. 



P.D. 70 7 

Personal Hygiene. 

In 1927 this department was equipped for the purpose of encouraging our women 
to take better care of their personal appearance. The operation of this depart- 
ment through the j^ear has demonstrated its value beyond question. It is con- 
fidently believed that a stimulated interest in one's personal welfare and appearance 
makes for a better mental attitude and this should have a beneficial influence in 
assisting in recovery or a betterment of certain mental states. It would be a 
mistake to become over enthusiastic over this or similar attempts to better the 
condition of patients and to assume too much as to its curative effect. 

The department here was received with much favor, the interest has been 
sustained and its facilities fully utilized. A material improvement in the ap- 
pearance and feeling of well being of the women who have received the benefits 
of this department has been seen. It has had an influence in the betterment of 
their condition. 

The room equipped to care for the troublesome conditions of the feet has been 
of special benefit. 

The use of this Personal Hygiene Department is shown as follows: Number of 
different patients treated, 405. Treatments given: waves, 1,809; shampoo, 1,873; 
massage, 1,419; cosmetics, 1,641: oil treatment, 321; hair cut, 588; hair removed 
from face, 405; hair removed from neck, 247; manicure, 1,479. Corns treated, 601; 
callouses, 362; club nails, 27; ingrowing nails, 39; blisters, 6; infections, 25. 

Occupational Therapy. 
This branch of hospital activitj^ has been successfully continued, it being, in 
fact, the main idea in mind at the time the Colony was established. Occupational 
Therapy includes all activitj^ to which patients are assigned by physicians just 
as much the work of the farm and in construction as in the occupational rooms vdth. 
diversional therapy. 

Following out the original idea of the Colonj^, as mam^ men as possible have 
been occupied on the farm and in construction and they have not only been better 
for it but the return to the patients themselves has naturally been considerable. 
In this part of the work if patients are properly assigned to it and proper supervision 
given it is just as important occupational therapy as lesser work indoors. It is 
in msLuy ways more interesting and constructive because during the work progress 
can be followed and worth-while results obtained which is always gratifjang to 
any worker. 

Occupational Therapy as carried on indoors for women has been under the active 
direction of four occupational therapists, in addition to the supervisors of various 
buildings and cottage groups. It has been of two distinct forms: the minor 
diversional occupation for those who are infirm, convalescent and those with more 
weakened minds, and that for those of higher mentality who are able to do con- 
structive work. In this latter group interest is much more keen in making the 
worth-while things used in the hospital and interest has been stimulated along these 
lines. 

For both groups, however, there seems to be particular interest in working with 
colors and very special interest has been shown in making various forms of dec- 
oration for the Assembly Hall and other rooms for parties, special entertainments 
or for their own use. Outstanding interest has been shown in the making of paper 
flowers, tinsel, and other decorative features for the Assembly Hall where several 
hundred patients have full enjoyment of them throughout the year, they being 
changed at intervals so that interest is maintained. 

On the men's side four instructors have been employed throughout the year- 
directing weaving, broom, brush, mattress and rug making; the making of all 
shoes and all clothing for both men and women and all furniture. Comparatively 
few of our men can be interested in minor diversional occupation but prefer to 
engage in some constructive occupation where they see very definite results. 
They are not so much interested in things artistic and beautiful as they are in the 
useful. Indoor occupations have been stimulated in buildings where patients are 
not able to go to the industrial rooms. Out-door occupation for women has been 
somewhat stimulated but not to the degree that it should be. Walks, picnics, 
parties, and berry picking have been much enjoyed. Tables following this report 



8 P.D. 70 

show the articles made in the Occupational Department that are of use. It is, 
of course, impossible to show in these tables the processes used in stimulating 
and training patients during which a large amount of instruction is given which does 
not result in completed articles. 

Diversion. 

The two chief forms of diversion and entertainment enjoyed by patients are 
dances, (the music for which is furnished by the band of the Colony) and motion 
pictures. A series of motion picture entertainments were given for twenty weeks 
during the winter months and upon other special occasions. The pictures are 
usuall}'- a seven or eight reel feature picture and a two reel comedy. Special 
entertainments have been provided at Christmas, New Year's, Easter, May Day 
and July 4th. 

The Annual Field Day was held on October 3. It was an all day out-of-door 
event. The merry-go-round was much enjoyed during the summer and fall. 
Band concerts have been given out of doors during the summer months. Ball 
games have been held at frequent intervals throughout the summer. As in former 
years patients have been sent to fairs in this neighborhood and to circuses. In 
addition to entertainment and diversion for our entire population, games, walks, 
etc., have been provided for the smaller groups. 

Medical. 

There have been several changes in the Medical Staff. The services of Dr. 
William B. Smith were concluded in February. Dr. Harold K. Marshall was 
selected to fill this vacancy in February. Dr. Frederick P. Moore was appointed 
Senior Assistant in March so that we now have a full Staff for the first time in 
several years. A Pharmacist was appointed in February, this position being 
newly created. 

The Worcester North District Medical Society met with us on October 23. 
Staff meetings have been held daily throughout the year; and a course of lectures 
in IMental Hygiene, under the auspices of the Department of Education cooperating 
with the Department of Mental Diseases and Society for Mental Hygiene, was 
given in Greenfield. 

Employees. 

Changes among the employees were less this year than usual. While the heads 
of departments and those in more important positions are relatively stationary, 
a considerable turnover occurs each year in those recently appointed to the ward 
service. 

There are employed at the Colony 209 persons. During the year 340 were 
appointed, 113 terminated their services by resignation or discharge. These 
340 persons were employed in 223 positions which was a rotation of 1.52. This was 
lower than pre\dous years which averaged about 2.5. The daily average number of 
aU employees during the year was 207.88, showing that all positions were filled 
practically continuously. The ratio of all employees to patients has been 1 to 
4.49 and the ratio of ward employees to patients is 1 to 11.25. 

Religious Services. 
Rehgious services have been held each Sunday for those of the Catholic faith 
and alternate Sundays for those of Protestant faith. Twice monthly Jewish 
services are held. 

Those of Catholic faith have received active direction and spiritual consolation 
by Rev. James R. ReiUy and his associate of Otter River, both of whom have made 
frequent calls day and night. Protestant services have been conducted by pastors 
of local churches in turn who also have paid frequent visits. Jewish ser^dces are 
directed by Rev. Moses L. Sedar of the Federation of Jewish Charities of Boston. 

Since the installation of the pipe organ in the chapel which was given b}^ the 
officers of the Colonj^, the services have been made very much more attractive 
and a choir at each service has made the religious services much more as they 
should be. Special services have been held Christmas and Easter which have 
been a great credit to those who have assisted and fully appreciated by all patients 
and officers alike. 



P.D. 70 9 

Financial. 

There was appropriated for maintenance $424,091.75. There has been expended 
S409,500.41. We returned to the Treasury $14,591.43. The balance could have 
been used to especially good advantage as our needs are pressing in many directions 
but it has seemed unwise to further increase our per capita cost which this year 
is $6.89. In 1927 it was $6.71, and in 1926, S6.44. The increased per capita 
cost is shown to be due chiefi}" to the increased per capita cost of personal service, 
$3.32 over $3.19 last year; food $1.02 over $.92 last year; clothing $.26 over $.21 
last year; furnishing and household supplies $.32 over $.29 last year. Over a 
period of five years the per capita cost has increased from $6.53 to $6.89 an increase 
of 36 cents. The total food costs for the past yesiT have been, in spite of all our 
efforts $6,000 more than the original appropriation. It was necessary to obtain 
an additional appropriation of $3,000 and a transfer of $3,000 from other items. 
This is due to two reasons: the increased cost of food stuffs in general and to a poor 
season on the farm which resulted in fewer vegetables being delivered to the 
kitchens. The farm averaged 11.36 ounces for patients per day delivered to the 
kitchen whereas in previous years the average has been between 15 and 20 ounces. 

Careful attention has been paid to the dietary conforming to the basic dietary 
for all hospitals which in general and with us seems to be satisfactory but with us 
only provided we have a successful year on the farm, allowing us to feed farm 
products in excess of the basic dietar3^ When farm products are less it immediately 
shows in the weight of our patients. This is due largelj^ to the fact that our patients 
are occupied in heavy work requiring muscular exercise, upon the grounds, the 
farm and in construction so that the required diet for these cannot be compared 
with the diet for patients who are engaged in light hospital occupation. The loss 
of weight of patients has caused us considerable concern. If repeated poor farm 
crops continue it will not be possible to continue the laborious occupations on as 
large a scale as formerly. 

Construction and Repairs. 

A special appropriation of $1,000 has enabled us with the cooperation of the 
town of Westminster and the Division of Highways, Department of Public Works, 
to complete that part of the road leading to the Colony within the town of West- 
minster. One half of this v/ork was done in 1927, one half mile, and the remaining 
three fourths mile has been completed this year. 

Fifteen thousand four hundred dollars was appropriated for additional filter beds. 
Seven additional beds have been constructed under the direction of Engineer J. J. 
Van Valkenburg but with our own labor. These beds are now in use. With these 
beds w^e now have double the former capacit3\ The construction of these beds 
by our labor has proved to be a long and difficult task occupying eight of our 
mechanical force and an average of 80 patients for several months, but this method 
of construction is in line ^^ith the original intent when the Colony was established 
and has resulted in a very material saving to the Commonwealth. 

An appropriation of $11,500 was granted for the re-location of sidetrack and 
construction of coal trestle. Several surveys and studies of this have been made 
but at this time no plan satisfactory to the Boston and Maine Railroad has been 
arrived at. From the studies made and additional requirements presented by 
the railroad company it would appear that the appropriation granted for this will 
not be sufficient. 

Money was appropriated for two bungalows for married employees. These 
bungalows have been erected, interior finish is now being applied and they will 
be ready for occupanc}^ early in the spring. 

A new building has been erected at the salvage yard which doubles its capacity. 

There have been laid 1,650 feet of 6-iiich water pipe between the Wachusett and 
the Westminster Cottages. This completes t:ie water line circuit to all of the 
outljdng colonies which provides a constant supply of water in case of fire and 
allows for necessary repairs to the line mthout interruption of service. 

At the laundry there has been installed an ai litii lal 1 1 noler iryer v'ii3h njve 
than doubles the former capacity for drying. An Aine-icaa four-p-)ckot 72-inch 
metal washer has been installed and also an American collar and cuff ironer. We 
are instaUing at the present time a four-rack stationary cbyer for officers' clothing. 
This brings the laundry equipment up to a desirable standard of efficiency. 



10 P.D. 70 

In the kitchen an Autosan dishwasher has been installed. 

In the new Treatment Building the following physical-therapy equipment has 
been installed: 1 Burdick Professional Special Bath Cabinet; 1 Burdick Self- 
contained water-cooled Ultra Violet mobile unit; 1 Engeln Portable Diathermy: 
1 Engeln Cabinet Model Diathermy Outfit; 1 Morse Wave Generator, complete; 
1 Burdick Super Standard Air Cooled Quartz Lamp; 1 Burdick Zoalite; 1 Burdick 
OsciUator; 1 Z-12 Zoalite; 1 Z-30 Zoalite. 

General Repairs and Improvements. 
One half of the greenhouse in use over twenty years has been rebuilt. 
The present coal trestle has been kept in repair as required by the Boston and 
Maine Raihoad. 

The Ash Cottage, an employees' cottage for twelve, nearing completion at the 
time of the last report, was occupied February 3. The Catalpa Cottage attic has 
been rebuilt giving an additional room lighted by a dormer and a stairway con- 
structed. At the Hillcrest Cottage fireproof vegetable and coal rooms have been 
built and the ceilings of the basement made fireproof. The ice chest has been 
rebuilt. A wagon and implement shed has been constructed at the Belcher Cot- 
tage. One cottage at the Gardner Group has been re-shingled, asbestos shingles 
being used. 

New electric fighting fixtures have been installed in the Men's Infirmary and the 
Administration Building. Cement floors of the toilets of the Men's Infirmary 
have been replaced with terrazzo. Ceilings in the various buildings needing 
repair have been replaced with sheet rock which we believe will prove better and 
far longer lasting. 

At the Power House an additional hot water heater has been installed with an 
auxihary centrifugal pump. There has also been instaUed a boiler water feed pump. 
Two boilers have been re-tubed and all boilers are in good condition but all over 
twenty years of age. 

The usual amount of painting has been done by patients under the direction 
of one employed painter. The cow barn has been painted twice inside, one coat 
each in the spring and fall. The Ash Cottage and the Belcher Cottage have been 
painted both inside and out. Both Men's and Women's Infirmaries have been 
painted inside throughout; and the following buildings have been painted outside: 
Overlook Cottage; Highland Cottage; Women's Infirmaiy; Hospital; Valley House 
and Annex; Laundry; Garage; Machine Shop and Paint Shop. 

Four new farm wagons have been built and four wagon bodies; and 950 pieces 
of furniture have been re-finished. 

Farm. 

Farm operations have been under the supervision of Hall C. Bowman, Head 
Farmer, who, with his associates, has been most active. If farm operations could 
be measured entirely by the interest taken, the farm returns would be most satis- 
factory, but like farming in smy year, in any locahty, the actual returns have been 
decided by weather conditions more than activity of operation and interest shown. 

The year has been a most discouraging one. The late spring made it impossible 
to begin farm operations until May, a month later than usual. Many seeds had to 
be replanted because of the cold and rainy spring and a general re-adjustment of 
the planting plan frequently made. Farm products did not arrive in our kitchens 
until July. 

Encroachment had to be made into the land from which we expected hay. 
After the cold and wet spring, summer gave promise still of bringing crops through 
satisfactorily but in September came more wet weather which caused delay in 
maturity of crops and especiaUy of rotting potatoes. 

We had every reason to expect a large potato crop this year (4,500) which crop 
in growing had been given unusual care and treatment, but rot before harvesting 
reduced the crop to 2,800 bushels, which will not be sufficient to m^eet our needs. 

It seems to me to be a mistake in this location to prescribe too closely the 
apparent necessary acreage of each crop to meet the need of the probable number 
of patients, based on the ideal season, because ideal seasons are not the rule and 
this year is the second in succession when we have failed to produce according to 
a pre-conceived plan of a prescribed number of acres for each crop. I have always 



P.D. 70 11 

advised that in this localit3% and considering the doubtful chances of raising full 
crops as planned, and as dependent as we are upon farm crops for an economical 
feeding of our population, that larger acreages of crops be planted. The year is 
an exceptional one when more crops are produced than can be economicalh^ used. 

The dairy situation has been an interesting one here. In 1921 a herd of 65 
cows were tubercular and the average production of miD^ per cow was 9,000 pounds 
produced at a cost of S.0745. The work of cleaning up the herd from disease was 
begun and it is a great satisfaction to report that in 1928 the new herd passed 
Federal and State tests successfully for the third time. In addition, we have 
reduced the number of cows necessarj^ for our millv supply to 53 and have increased 
the average production to 13,216 pounds at a cost of 8.067 per quart. This building 
up of the herd has been due to the interest and the constant attention given to the 
situation; by the immediate removal of new-born calves from their mothers; by 
careful selection of breeding stock and in breeding and b}^ frequent elimination 
of low producing and unfit animals. The time has long since passed when it is 
profitable to board cows and the elimination of the unprofitable ones has been 
severely practiced. 

The production of milk and beef have reached the point, or rather w^e have 
brought our \dewpoint to the fact, that it is purely a business proposition just as 
the manufacture of any article of commerce. The cows are now considered pretty 
much the same as machines, made to produce at a profit and eliminated as promptly 
as unprofitable. 

For two years w^e have had trouble with the introduction of contagious abortion 
in our cows and for a time this looked serious. This year, however, two only 
have been affected. For the first time this year hemorrhagia septicaemia made its 
appearance in our heifers and three heifers w^ere lost. Treatment of the entire 
lot of heifers was immediate^ done and the situation controlled. It is apparent 
that it will be necessary to treat all heifers annually for this in the future. 

The breeding and care of swine has received increased attention this year. 
The number carried has been the same as last year and the production of pork 
practically the same but the condition and the weight of the entire herd at the end 
of the year show marked improvement. The raising of pork this year shows a loss 
of S252.57. Making a profit in raising pork seems difficult when the table waste 
is reduced to a minimum and grain is purchased, particularly as swdne seem very 
prone to disease. The cost of grain this year was S.460 more than last year or a 
total of S134 more than for 1927. Mention may be made here that immediately 
after the close of the year while this report was in preparation we have been plunged 
into a serious situation because of an outbreak of Hog Cholera due, we are con- 
vinced, to insufficient immunization, although immunization has been faithfully 
carried out through the year under the direction of the Bureau of Animal Industry. 
Such immunization apparently is not sufficient and more intensive immunization 
is now being practiced. 

Better success with poultry has been obtained this year than formerh^ The 
2,000 day-old chicks purchased w^ere of better stock than last year. The loss 
during the first three months has been less and they have developed better. Egg 
production has been increased to 109 per hen and the cost of production reduced. 
The poultry department this year shows an increase of SI, 000 more in eggs, $208 
more in meat, and an increase of S295 in the inventory at the end of the year. 
The total cost of the operation of the Poultry Plant was $3,834.09 showing a profit 
of $1,440.47. 

A large amount of work has been done in clearing up fields, working upon roads, 
and assisting in construction. A fair estimate of rocks removed from fields is 
$6,850 tons. Of this, 3,425 tons have been used in road construction, 1,500 tons in 
the construction of walks and 30 tons have been crushed. The number of square 
yards of gravel road resurfaced was 4,377, and the cubic yards of gravel moved 
and used in construction, 1,068. Four acres of rough land have been cleared of 
stone and put under cultivation; five acres have been partially cleared and 44 
acres have been cleared of underbrush; 46,500 feet of lumber have been cut and 
sawed; 510 cords of firewood cut and sawed; 230 fence posts and 600 stakes cut; 
2,200 tons of ice harvested. 

We have continued re-forestation work this year; 5,000 red pine, 5,000 white 



12 



P.D. 70 



pine and 5,000 Norwegian spruce seedlings were planted. The number of Mac- 
intosh apple trees set out was 125. 

Printing. 

For five years now the Printery established here by the Department of Mental 
Diseases has done all form printing for the fifteen hospitals under the supervision 
of the Department, printing required by the Department, and all legal forms used 
by the courts in commitment. There are now 200 standard institution and inter- 
department forms used by all hospitals as well as 288 Department standard forms 
used largely for medical records. In addition to the printing of forms the annual 
reports of fourteen hospitals have been printed, the annual report of the Depart- 
ment of IMental Diseases and two quarterly publications of the department. As 
many as 35,000 Christmas folders of eight pages each were printed in colors. 

The equipment of the Printery is 4 automatic presses, 3 job presses, machines 
for paper cutting, blocking and stapling. A Head Printer and an Assistant Printer 
is the organization of this Department assisted by 18 patients. By the operation 
of this plant a considerable sa\ang has naturally been made. The outstanding 
feature is that of occupation for the patients. It is the type of work in which the 
patients take great interest being perhaps one of the most interesting forms of 
occupation for men that we have. 

This Department has been located in the laundry building but as the growth 
of the hospital continues it will be necessary to use this space for laundry purposes 
and a separate building for the Printing Plant is requested by the Department of 
Mental Diseases for 1929. Temporarity a part of the space vacated will be used 
for weaving in connection with our textile department inasmuch as it is impossible 
to add more looms on the floor in the Industrial Building given over to textile work. 

Recommendations . 

Follomng the recommended development over a ten-year period, prepared in 
1926, the following needs are presented for which special appropriations are re- 
quested in 1929: 

1 . Treatment Building for Disturbed Men. This would be essentially a duplicate 
of a building built for women in 1927. This building would house 86 patients and 
contain rooms and equipment for the proper treatment for disturbed mental con- 
ditions. We have no such provision for the treatment of men at the present time 
and on the date of this writing have 41 men who are in need of active treatment 
in order to promote improvement or recovery and control excitement which may 
be continuous or periodic. At the present time these men are distributed among 
the various buildings but they are chiefly cared for in the Men's Infirmary where 
there are 186 patients. It requires no lengthy description here to make evident 
the need of treatment for the benefit of those needing it and for the benefit of those 
140 other men who are compeUed to be in close daily and nightly contact with 
patients of this t^'pe. This building is very urgentty needed. 

2. Dairy Building. We have a splendid herd of cows free from Tuberculosis 
and accredited producing an average of over 13,000 lbs. of milk each per year. 
Milking is done by electricity. It is strained, clarified and pasteurized. The 
latter operations are done in a room entirely unsuited for the purpose, unsanitary, 
and used also for the washing of utensils, cans, the keeping of records and supplies, 
and the heating facilities are a positive menace. It is proposed that we build a 
small dairv^ building entirely removed from our present cow tie-up to provide a 
seprate room for washing of utensils, a sterilizing room and pasteurizing room and 
a room for the preparation of milk, a boiler room which will make for safety not 
alone for this buflding but for the entire group of barns with which the present 
building is now connected. 

3. Printery Building. A Printery in which all forms, annual reports and aUied 
printing for fifteen hospitals and the Department of Mental Diseases was organized 
here by the Department of Mental Diseases and has been in operation for five 
years. It was located in the Laundry Building in a space not then actually needed, 
but development of this plant during the five years has now reached a point where 
a separate building is needed. Such a building would make for efficiency of the 
printing operations and would make avaflable the space now occupied for other 
purposes, 



P.D. 70 13 

Repairs and Renewals. 
Under this heading is included such repairs, extensions and equipment which are 
not properly annual repairs. 

1. Cement Vault for Records. The law required that all records be kept in a 
fireproof vault. We have no suitable provision for complj-ing with the law. 

2. Sprinkler System for Attics, Hallwaj^s and Basements of the Men's and 
Women's Infirmaries. These buildings house 186 patients each. They are of 
semi-fireproof construction having wood floors, stairs and wood roofs. A fire 
occurring in either of these buildings might easil}" become very disastrous. Men 
working out of doors leave their work clothes in the lockers in the basement and 
only recenth' a fire was discovered in the clothing in a locker due to leaving a hot 
tobacco pipe in the pocket. On another occasion a patient had set fire to a mattress 
on the top floor. This fortunately was immediately discovered. 

3. Wire Mesh for Stair Halls in Men's and Women's Infirmaries. To prevent 
suicidal attempts by throwing one's self over the railing to the floors below. Three 
attempts have been made but fortunately there have been no serious results. 

4. Fence and Yard for Four Bulls. Bulls are not properly and safely housed 
at the present time and have no suitable j^ard for exercise. 

5. Fireproof Roofing for 14 Buildings. These are now covered -^dth wood 
shingles. Three times in the past year three fires have occurred upon the roofs 
due to sparks from the chimnej^s. We have had sufficient warning that this risk 
should not be continued and asbestos shingles would seem to be the answer. 

6. Flour Mixing Equipment. The present dough mixer has been in use for 15 
3'ears, is worn out and must be replaced. It is recommended that a two and one- 
half barrel mixer be installed. 

7. Ventilating System for Hoods and Dishwashers in Kitchen and Serving 
Rooms. Hoods without forced draft will not ventilate. An exhaust fan system 
is recommended. 

8. Power House and IVIachine Shop Needs. Several items are included here: 
an oil tank with pump for the proper handling of oil. A vacuum pump to properly 
circulate steam to the buildings. A carload of red cedar poles for outside wiring 
and the re-tubing of one boiler. 

9. Building on top of Vegetable Cellar. The present vegetable cellars, 40' x 40' x 
10' are built underground. It is recommended that on one of these a building be 
constructed where can be stored such vegetables as onions, squash, etc., which 
do not keep well underground. This would also serve as storage for light farm 
machinery. 

10. Pneumatic Press for Laundry. This is needed because of the growth of the 
institution. 

11. Repairs to Coal Trestle. This is an annual request due to the fact that the 
Boston and Maine Railroad requires annual repairs which will be necessary until 
a new sidetrack and coal trestle is constructed. 

12. Repair Chimney at Power House. This is a Heinicke circular chimney 
built years ago and has required no repair since. It now needs re-pointing through- 
out the entire upper third and the top rebuilt. 

13. Re-building entrances to three Vegetable Cellars. The retaining walls to 
these cellars are falling down and repairs are essential. 

14. Subway to Paint Shop and Store. The store is located 525 feet beyond the 
Power House at a much lower level. Steam pipes installed to this building 20 
years ago are in need of replacement and it is recommended that they be replaced 
within a small cement subway where they can be properly covered and cared for. 

All of the above work with the exception of the Treatment Building would be 
done by our own labor and without the aid of an architect. 

Acknowledgments. 
Books and magazines were received trom the following: Chas. A. Barnard, 
Gardner; Dr. Colby, Gardner; Mrs. Frank Dunn, Gardner; Mrs. Herbert Bruce, 
Gardner; George F. Tucker, Gardner; Walter Beaman, Gardner; W. E. Hubbard, 
Gardner; Dr. A. F. Lowell, Gardner; Dr. P. J. Grant, Gardner; Massachusetts 
General Hospital, Boston; Leighton Cleaves, Gardner; Fred A. Whitney, Leo- 
minster; Mrs. Harold Drake, Gardner; Miss Frances Danforth, Gardner; Chas. 



14 P.D. 70 

F. Houghton, Worcester; Mrs. Ruth Cleaves, Gardner; iMrs. J. C. Putnam, Leo- 
minster; Mayos Drug Store, Gardner; Mrs. A. E. Taylor, Gardner; Mrs. Peckett, 
Worcester; Mrs. Chase, Worcester; Mrs. C. E. Thompson, East Gardner; Mrs. 
Frederic :Moore, East Gardner; Herbert J. Larkin, East Gardner; Elks Lodge, 
Gardner; song books, Helen Nutting, Ashburnham. 

Religious literature was received from the following: George A. Dunn, Gardner; 
Rev. Winfield S. Randall, Westminster; Mrs. Chas. Scales, Ashburnham; Christian 
Science Distributing Committee, Leominster. 

Miscellaneous articles as follows were also received: playing cards, Helen Nutting, 
Ashburnham; Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Worcester; magazine subscription money was 
donated by Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Worcester; passover bread, oranges, etc. for 
Jewish patients from Federation of Jewish Charities; pictures, clothing, pieces 
suitable for rugs, Mrs. F. J. Lothrop, Mrs. Leadbetter, Leominster; gum, cigarettes, 
tooth paste, cards, talcum powder. Veterans of Foreign Wars Ladies Auxiliarj^, 
Braintree Highlands; box of hats, Herbert White, Gardner; Victrola records, 
Mrs. Frank Emery, Fitchburg; 3 Belgian hares, Percival Henry, Rock, Mass.; 
2 dolls, Mrs. 0. M. Sargent, So. Royalston; 5 coats, 5 pairs trousers, 1 vest for 
general use, Mrs. F. Shaw, Leominster. 

In concluding this report I wish to record my appreciation of the spirit of earnest 
and friendlj^ cooperation that has been shown again the past year b}^ those asso- 
ciated with me daily in the work and to you the members of the Board of Trustees 
for your consideration, advice and assistance. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, Superintendent. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 
Work Done By Women. 

The following work has been done by women: Aprons, various kinds, 731; bags, 
various kinds, 326; bandages, 228; baskets, various kinds, 91; bedspreads, 137; 
belts, adhesive, 7; belts, sanitary, 72; bibs, 8; binders, abdominal, 11; blankets, 687; 
bloomers, 4; blouses, 6; buffet set, 1; bureau covers, 13; burlap, colored, 626 lbs.; 
caps, various kinds, 473; caps, housemaids', 8; caps, night, 50; caps, waitress, 176; 
centerpieces, 30; chair covers, 8; chemises, 240; coats, 859; corset covers. 111; 
combinations, 203; couch cover, 1; collar and cuff set, 1; curtains, 175 pairs; 
curtain material, woven, 42 yds; sofa cushions, 89; diapers, 49; doilies, various kinds, 
587; dresses and bungalow aprons, 1,123; fomentation cloths, 32; handkerchiefs, 
36; handkerchiefs, painted, 6; holders, 144; holders, embroidered, 15; hot water 
bottle covers, 4; ice bag covers, 2; ice collars, 6; ice collar covers, 2; jumpers, 125; 
lace, crocheted, 221 yds.; lace, hairpin, 29 yds.; lace, tatting, 21}^ yds.; lamp shades, 
3; luncheon sets, 7; mattress ticks, 244; mittens, 830 pairs; neckties, 634; night- 
shirts, 120; overalls, 415 pairs; panels, door, 3; napkins, 22; pads, bed, 2; petti- 
coats, 269; pillows, various, 38; pillow ticks, 34; pillow slips, 399; princess slips, 5; 
patterns, 20; pillows, sweetheart, 4; pillows, baby, 2; pillow tops, embroidered, 16; 
pillow slips, cretonne, 3; pin cushion, 1; puff, bed, 2; quilts, 2; rags, dyed, 1,687>^ 
lbs.; robes, bath, 73; robes, burial, 62; rugs, 445; rug, silk, 1; rings, crochet, 16; 
scarfs and shawls, 56; scarfs, hand painted silk, 2; shirts, men's outside, 877; 
sheets, 1,781; socks, bed, 62; socks, men's, 5,025 pairs; stockings, 1,204 pairs; 
stockings, knitted, 2 pairs; shppers, blanket, 37 pairs; suspenders, 190 pairs; table- 
cloths, 154; table runners, 69; tie backs, 42; towels, dish, 12; towels, hydro, 12; 
towels, officers', 1,042; towels, patients', 1,013; towels, sanitary, 1,134; towels, 
embroidered, 29; tray cloths, 5; tub covers, 30; tub hammocks, 31; underdrawers, 
men's, 986 pairs; underdrawers, women's, 662 pairs; undershirts, men's, 588; 
undershirts, 191; union suits, 3; vases, 82; vanity sets, 19; vests, 17; wash cloths, 
256; novelties, 129; yarn dyed, 40>^ lbs.; yokes, crocheted, 2. Articles made from 
crepe paper: baskets, 294; blossoms, 3,202; border, 183 yds.; birds, 626; aprons, 
32; caps, 35; neckties, 12; trees, 11. 

The following mending has been done during the year: Altar cloth, 1; aprons, 
419; bags, coffee, 12; bags, laundry, 129; bags, miscellaneous, 29; bathrobes, 9; 
bedspreads, 63; bed puffs, 2; blankets, 84; bloomers, 24; caps, 5; chemises, 287; 
coats, 776; combination suits, 120; corsets, 13 pairs; corset covers, 43; dental chair 
covers, 42; doilies, 16; drawers, 896; dresses, 2,583; flags, 7; gowns, surgeon, 4; 
holders, 24; hose, 10,156 pairs; jumpers, 2,060; kimona, 1; kitchen pads, 20; 



P.D. 70 15 

lamp shades, 6; mattress ticks, 3; mittens, 11 pairs; nightgowns, 1,177; overalls, 
2,435 pairs; princess slips, 19; petticoats, 1,352; pillow slips, 84; pillow ticks, 2; 
rugs, 65; screens, 11; shirts, 4,492; sheets, 154; shawls, 3; slippers, bed, 2 pairs; 
sweaters, 69; tablecloths, 12; towels, 320; trousers, 2,836 pairs; tub covers, 71; 
tub hammocks, 61 ; union suits, 417; undershirts, 2,152; underdrawers, 2,026 pairs; 
valances, 28; vests, 303; wash cloths, 24. 

Textile Department. 

The follo^\^ng work has been done in this Department: Bedspread material, 
353^ yds.; blanket material, 1,553^ yds.; brooms, corn and barn, 483; brushes, 
430; cocoa mats, 9; denim, 359 yds.; gingham, 3,327^^ yds.; Khaki cloth, 2,SQQ}4 
yds.; mattresses, new, 108; mattresses, remade, 105; pillows, 32; pillows, remade, 
11; pocketing material, 186^ yds.; pads, mattress, 2; mats, special, 2; sheeting, 
2,890 yds.; shirting, 2,074 yds.;" strong cloth, 878^ yds.; reefer lining, 196K yds.; 
toweling, 2,909 yds.; underwear material, 2,767 yds.; mitten wristlet material, 
431 yds.; unden\'ear wristlet, 431 K 3'ds.; socks, 5,025 pairs; stockings, 1,204 pairs. 

Repair Work: Blow out patches, 14; chairs, repaired, 6; cocoa mat repaired, 1; 
cushions recovered, 2; divans, recovered, 4; long handled floor brushes repaired, 4; 
mattress tufts cut, 51,400. 

Furniture Department. 

Following is a list of work done in the Furniture Department: baskets, waste, 
46; bedside tables, 13; bed screens, 8; census board, 1; chiffoniers, 15; davenport 
tables, 2; desk spindles, 8; dining chairs, 26; double screen, 1; firescreens, 15; 
index box, 1; mirrors, 18; settees, 9; shades, 66; rollers, 5; tj^pewriter table, 1; 
stretchers, 3; wardrobes, 2. 

Repair Work: Auto curtains, 9; bedside tables, 29; brush, 1; camera, 1; chairs, 
repaired, 412; wheelchairs, 2; checker boards, 11; clocks, 4; couches, 10; chiffoniers, 
7; desks, 2; dressers, 3; drawers, 14; knives sharpened, 14; mirrors, 7; locks, 5; 
looms, 2; plate holders, 2; picture frames, 15; screens, 2; scale, 1; settees, 27; 
swabs, 29; stools, 2; shades adjusted, 136; sewing tables, 9; scissors sharpened, 87; 
tables, 19; towel rack, 1; wheelbarrows, 2; victrolas, 9. 

Work Done in Shoe Department. 

Brogans, 164 pairs; mattress covers, rubber, 11; mitten leathers, 792 pairs; 
pillow slips, rubber, 2; shoes, men's, 285 pairs; shoes, women's, 111 pairs; slippers, 
234 pairs; suspender tips, 715; aprons, rubber, 2. 

Repair Work: Art squares, 2; auto curtains, 22; auto cushions, 2; blankets, 
storm, 4; baseball shoes, 2; baseball bases, 6; blanket, horse, 1; bag, tool, 1; belts, 
leather, 8; breeching straps, 2; sewing canvas, 1; couch, leather, 1; desk pads, 3; 
grommets in curtains, 25; halters, 13; hobbles, 4; harness girths, 4; horse collars, 3; 
filter press cloths, 10; mattress covers, rubber, 19; oiling harnesses, 3 sets; martin- 
gales, 2; rein snaps, 7; rubber heels attached, 248 pairs; shoes, officers', 271 pairs; 
shoes, patients', 2,468 pairs; shaft tugs, 3; spread ring straps, 4; sweat pads, 2; 
saddles, 2; suitcases, 2; strap hames, 5; trace yoke, 1; traces, express, 7; team 
harnesses, 9; team reins, 20; bridle, 1; wooden leg, 1. 

Work Done in the Tailoring Department. 
Caps cut, 687; caps pressed, 501; coats made, 834; chemises cut, 291; dresses 
cut, 740; jumper and overalls cut, 456; nightgowns, women's, cut, 223; nightshirts, 
men's, 325; officers' clothes pressed, 783; patients' clothing repaired, 2,513; reefers 
cut, 81; shirts, men's outside, 664; trousers cut, 814 pairs; trousers pressed, 701 
pairs; underwear, men's cut, 1,389; underwear, women's cut, 672; vests cut, 12; 
ve§ts pressed, 8. 



16 P.D. 70 

VALUATION. 

November 30, 1928. 
Real Estate. 

Land, 1,856 acres $37,350.00 

Buildings 1,038,923.09 

§1,076,273.09 

Personal Property. 

Travel, transportation and office expenses ........ $100.00 

Food 8,564.17 

Clothing and materials ............ 30,451 . 15 

Furnishings and household supplies .......... 172,815.05 

^Medical and general care ............ 5,132.96 

Heat, light and power 10,520. 10 

Farm 47,519.09 

Garage, stables and grounds ........... 9,920.07 

Repairs 17,831.54 

$302,854.13 

Summary. 

Real estate $1,076,273.09 

Personal property 302,854.13 

$1,379,127.22 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 
To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1928. 

Cash Accotjxt. 
Receipts. 

Income. 

Board of Patients $29,876.51 

— $29,876.51 

Personal Ser\-ices: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement ....... 136 . 87 

Sales: 

Food $3,085.27 

Clothing and materials '. . 328 . 13 

Farm: 

Pigs and hogs 2 . 00 

Hides 290.03 

Sundries, poultry . . . . . . . 1 . 72 

293.75 

Repairs, ordinary, bbls. and junk ...... 282.24 

Arts and Crafts sales 857 . 97 

Keys 5 . 00 

Total sales 4,852 . 36 

Aliscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances ........ S772 . 67 

Rent 908.49 

Sundries, com. on telephone calls . . . . . . 23 . 04 

1,704.20 

Total income $36,569.94 

AIaixtexaxce. 

Balance from pre\'ious year, brought forward ........ -$2, 741. 75 

Appropriations, current year . . . . . . . . . . . 421,350.00 

Total 8424,091.75 

Expenses (as analyzed below) ........... 409,494.80 



Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth ....... .§14,596.95 

Analysis of Expenses. 

Personal serv-ices 8197,104.68 

Religious instruction ............ 1,316.00 

Travel, transportation and office expenses ......... 4,070.64 

Food 60,693.92 

Clothing and materials ............ 15,332.61 

Fxirnishings and household supplies . . . . . . . . . . 18,911.33 

M edical and general care ............ 17,995.66 

H eat, light and power 33,221 . 39 

Farm 30,991.60 

G arage, stable and grounds ........... 6,789.94 

Repairs, ordinary ............. 14,725.19 

R epairs and renewals ............ 8,341.84 

Total expenses for maintenance .......... 8409,494.80 



P.D. 70 



17 



Special Appropriatioxs. 

Balance December 1, 1927 $24,457.99 

Appropriations for current year ........... 32,700.00 



Total $57,157.99 

Expended during the year (see statement below) ..... $33,439.65 

Reverting to Treasury- of Commonwealth . . . . . . . 8.47 

S33.448.12 



Balance November 30, 1928, carried to next year 



§23,709.87 





Act 




Expended 


Total 


Balance 


Object. 


or 


Whole 


During 


Expended 


at End 




Resolve. 


Amotmt. 


Fiscal Year. 


to Date. 


of Year. 


Emplovees' Cottage 


1927-138 


$12,000.00 


$1,687.90 


$11,797.40 


$202.60 


Bldg. for Semi-Dist. Pa- 


1926-79 


150,000.00 


5,506.79 


146,631.69 


3.368.31 


tients 


1927-138 










Highway Rep. in West.* . 


1926-138 


1,000.00 


126.02 


999.40 


.60 


Food Convevors 


1926-79 


3,850.00 


2,919.81 


3,847.87 


2.13 


Add'l. Filter Beds . 


1927-138 


15,000.00 


13,821.84 


13,821.84 


1.178.16 




1928-127 










Laundrj- Machinery- 


1927-138 


7,000.00 


701.81 


6,842.29 


157.71 


Add'l. Water Supply 


1924-126 


42,000.00 


366. S9 


36,699.25 


5.300.75 


1926-398 










Coal Trestle* 


1926-79 


1,500.00 


108.80 


1,492.13 


7.87 


OflBcers' Cottages . 


1928-127 


10,000.00 


8,165.41 


8,165.41 


1,834.59 


Coal Trestle and Side Track 


1928-127 


10,700.00 


10,700.00 


Rep. Road Westminster . 


192S-127 


1,000.00 


34.38 


34 .'38 


965.62 






$254,050.00 


$33,439.65 


$230,331 . 66 


$23,718.34 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with*) . 
Balance carried to next year .......... 



$8.47 



Total as above 



$23,709.87 



Per Capita. 



During the year the average number of inmates has been 1,084.388 (At Hospital) 

52.818 (Family Care) 



1,137.206 
(52 weeks to year). 



Total cost for maintenance, $409.494 . 80 
Equal to a weekly per capita cost of S6 . 
Receipt from sales. $4,852.36. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.0816. 
All other institution receipts. $31,717.58. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.533. 
Net weekly per capita $6 . 2723. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GERTRUDE W. PERRY, Treasurer. 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 
As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association 
Prescribed by the Massachusetts Dep-\rtment of ^Mental Diseases. 

Table 1. General Information. 

Data correct at end of hospital year, November 30, 1928. 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22. 1902. 

2. T>-pe of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant — Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings 
Personal property .... 



Total 



$1,076,273.09 
. 302,854.13 

$1,379,127.22 



Total acreage of hospital property owned: 1.856. 



18 

4. OflScers and Employees: 



Superintendents . 
Assistant physicians 
Clinical assistants 

Total physicians 

Stewards .... 

Resident dentists . 

Pharmacists 

Graduate nurses . 

Other nurses and attendants . 

Occupational therapists 

Social workers 

All other officers and employees 
Total officers and employees 



Actually in Service at 


End of Year. 




F. T. 


1 


1 


3 
— 


1 4 
— — 


4 


1 5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




4 4 


56 


40 96 




5 9 


47 


45 92 



P.D. 70 

Vacancies at End 

of Year. 
M. F. T. 



114 



95 



209 



Note: — The following items, 5-9, inc., are for the year ended September 30, 1928. 
5. Census of patient population at end of year: 

Actually in Hospital 

White: 
Insane 

Mental defectives 
All other cases 



14 



Absent from Hospital 
but Still on Books. 



Total . 
Other races: 
Insane . 
Mental defectives 

Total . 

Grand Total 



6. Patients under treatment in occupational-therapy classes, including 

physical training, on date of report ...... 

7. Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of report 

8. Average daily number of all patients actually in hospital during year 

9. Volimtary patients admitted during year ..... 



M. 


F. 


T. 


598 


401 


999 


44 


27 


71 


5 




5 


. 647 


428 


1,075 


IS 


8 


21 


1 




1 


14 


8 


22 


661 


436 


1,097 



M. 


F. 


T. 


38 


42 


80 


6 


6 


12 


4 


2 


6 


48 


50 


98 


48 


50 


98 


Alales. 


Females. 


Total. 



. 653 . 292 426 . 509 1,079 . 801 
.5 - 5 



T-iBLE 2. Financial Statement. 
See treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



D. 70 



o 

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^ Tt^ (N (M CO CO iO 
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CO o 

CO lO 


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00 05C;i>iOC0 CO-^cOrt^CsiOTj^ 
O rf CO C: CO (M lO 

CO 



00 

CO "ti 

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^ I 1 CO I ^ 05 ^ 

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1-H o 

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C: OOOOOfMi-i LOCOCOOQOaTj^Ol ^00 
i-< CO CO C: r- i-H (05 rj^ O CIO 

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T}< lO T-( ^-1 OQ CO 



00 l> I> Ol CO 

CO CO 00 'Tt* 

CO 

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TtH CO CO i-H C5 ^ ^ 
05 ^ 



xt^ o 
CO lO 



00 

o 



00 



i 

o 
U2 



1—1 
1= 



-^3 

la 
o 

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J ^ 

O c3 o ^ 



C3 CB C 32.^ S O ^ ^ 

o c^.'JS !- o-^ 5 > j: c 

•J £.b ^^^^ J is « CO cc M 



o 

11 

^ o 



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20 P.D. 70 



Table 4. Xafivity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions. 



Nativity. 


Patiexts. 


Parents of Male 
Patients. 


P.vrexts of Female 

P.ITIEXTS. 


M. F. T. 


Fathers. Mothers, p^o^^^^^ 


Fathers. Mothers, 


United States . 
Canada ' ... 
England .... 
Finland .... 
Germany 

Ireland .... 
Italv .... 
Poland .... 
Scotland .... 
Sweden .... 
Other coxintries 
Unascertained . 

Total 


24 27 51 
3 3 6 
1 1 2 
6 3 9 
2-2 
- 2 2 
112 
1 1 
1 1 
1 - 1 
1 1 


15 16 15 
5 4 4 

1 1 1 
8 8 8 

2 2 2 

3 3 3 
111 

1 1 1 

2 2 2 


20 21 19 
5 6 5 
1 1 1 
3 3 3 
1 - - 
5 4 3 
111 
1 1 1 
1 1 1 

1 1 1 
1 1 1 


38 40 78 


38 38 37 


40 40 36 



'Includes Newfoundland. 



22 



P.D. 70 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions. 



Citizens by birth . . . . 
Citizens by naturalization 






Males. Females. Total. 
24 27 51 
4 7 11 
7 4 11 
3 2 5 


Total 






38 


40 78 


Table 6. 


Psychoses of First Admissions. 






Psychoses. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. .T 



10. 



13. 



Traumatic psychoses ..... 

Senile psychoses ...... 

Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 
General paralysis ...... 

Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 
Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 
Psychoses with brain tumor .... 

Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total 
Alcoholic psychoses, total .... 

Other types, acute or chronic 
Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 

Other exogenous toxins .... 
Psychoses with pellagra .... 
Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 

Exhaustion delirium ..... 

Other diseases or conditions 
Manic-depressive psychoses, total . 

Manic type ...... 

Depressive tjrpe ..... 
Involution melancholia ..... 
Dementia prsecox (schizophrenia) . 
Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 
Epileptic psychoses ..... 
Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 

Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) 

Other types ...... 

Psychoses vdih psychopathic personality 
Psychoses with mental deficiency . 
Undiagnosed psychoses ..... 

Without psychosis, total .... 

Epilepsy without psychosis 

Psychopathic personality without psychosis . 

Mental deficiency without psychosis 

Others 



Total 



38 



40 



78 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses. 



Race. 



Total. 



Traumatic. 



Senile. 



With 
cerebral 
arterio-' 
sclerosis. 



General 
paralysis. 



With cerebral 
syphylis. 



African (black) 
Armenian 
EngUsh 
Finnish 
French 
German 
Irish 

Italian i . 
Lithuanian 
Scandinavian 2 
Scotch 
Slavonic 3 . 
Mixed 
Race unasceertained 

Total 



38 



40 



78 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



1 1 2 



1 - 1 
-22 



1 - 1 
2-2 
1 - 1 



1 1 



2 4 
2 2 



9 14 



4 3 7 



M. F. T. 



1 Includes "North" and "South." 2 Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

3 Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dalmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, Russian, Ruthe- 
nian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



P.D. 70 23 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued. 



Race. 


With 
Huntington's 
chorea. 


With brain 
tumor. 


With other 
brain or 
nervous 
diseases. 


Alcoholic. 


Due to drugs 
and other 
exogenous, 
toxins. 


With 
pellagra. 




M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


African (black) .... 
Armenian ..... 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Irish ...... 

Italian 1 ..... 

Lithuanian .... 

Scandinavian ^ . . . . 

Scotch ..... 

Slavonic^ ..... 

Mixed 

Race unascertained 








2-2 
1 - 1 

1 - 1 
1 1 


- 1 1 




Total 








5-5 


- 1 1 




1 Includes "North" and "South." 2 Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

' Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dahnatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, Russian, Ruthe- 
nian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 


Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classiiied with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued. 


Race. 


With other 
somatic 
diseases. 


Manic- 
depressive. 


Involution 
melan- 
cholia. 


Dementia 
praecox. 


Paranoia 

and 
paranoid 
conditions. 


Epileptic 
psychoses. 




M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


African (black) .... 
Armenian ... 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German ..... 

Irish 

Italian i 

Lithuanian ..... 
Scandinavian 2 .... 

Scotch 

Slavonic 3 ..... 
Mixed ..... 
Race unascertained 


1 1 2 

- 1 1 

- 2 2 

- 1 1 


- 1 1 

- 1 1 
1 - 1 

- 1 1 

- 1 1 

- 2 2 


- 1 1 

- 1 1 

- 1 1 


- 1 1 
2-2 
1 1 2 

1 1 2 

- 1 1 

2-2 

- 1 1 






Total 


1 5 6 


1 6 7 


- 3 3 


6 5 11 







1 Includes "North" and "South." 2 Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

3 Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dalamatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, Russian, Ruthe- 
nian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



24 P.D.70 

Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded. 



Race. 


Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses. 


With 
psycho- 
pathic 
personality. 


With 
mental 
deficiency. 


Un- 
diagnosed 
psychoses. 


Without 
psychosis. 




M. F. 


T. 


M F T 


M F T 


M. 


F. T. 


M. 


F. 


r. 


Airic3n (Dl^cK) 








1 — 1 








- 


- 




Arnienian .... 












1 


1 








English ..... 
















2 




2 


Fmnisti ..... 
















1 


1 


2 


Frencb ..... 










1 




1 


1 


1 




Gernian ..... 


1 


1 












1 




1 


Irish 












1 


1 








Italian 1 






















Lithuanian .... 






















Scandinavian 2 






















Scotch 






















Slavonic 3 .... 






















Mixed 


1 


1 


1 1 2 




1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


Race unascertained . 
















1 




1 


Total .... 


1 1 


2 


1 1 2 


1 - 1 


2 


2 


4 


7 


4 


11 



1 Includes "North" and "South." 2 Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

3 Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dalmatian, Herzego'vinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, Russian, Ruthe- 
nian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



Table S. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses. 



Psychoses. 


Total. 


Under 
15 years. 


15-19 
years. 




20-24 
years. 




25-29 
years. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T 


M. F 


. T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


























2. Senile 


5 


9 


14 


















3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


4 


3 


7 


















4. General paralysis 


4 




4 


















5. With cerebral syphilis .... 
























6. With Huntington's chorea 
























7. With brain tumor . . . . . 
























8. With other brain or nervous diseases . 
























9. Alcoholic ...... 


5 




5 


















10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 




1 


1 


















11. With pellagra; ...... 
























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


5 


6 


















13. Manic-depressive 


1 


6 


7 


- 1 1 
















14. Involution melancholia .... 




3 


3 


















15. Dementia praecox 


6 


5 


11 




1 


- 1 


1 




1 


- 1 


1 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 
























17. Epileptic psychoses 
























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


1 


2 




1 - 


- 1 












19. With psychopathic personality . 


1 


1 


2 


















20. With mental deficiency .... 


1 




1 


















21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 


2 


2 


4 








1 




1 






22. Without psychosis 


7 


4 


11 




1 


- 1 


1 




1 


- 2 


2 


Total 


38 


40 


78 


- 1 1 


3 - 


- 3 


3 




3 


- 3 


3 



P.D. 70 25 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued. 





30-34 




35-39 




40-44 




45-49 




50-54 




Psychoses. 


years. 




years. 




years. 




years. 




years. 






M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic ...... 






















2. Senile ....... 


















- 2 


2 


3. With cerebral arterisoclerosis 






















4. General paralysis 


_ _ 


_ 


1 - 


1 


3 - 


3 










5. With cerebral syphilis .... 






















6. With Huntington's chorea .... 






















7. With brain tumor .... 






















8. With other brain or nervous diseases 






















9. AlcohoUc ....... 


_ 


_ 


1 - 


1 


_ _ 


_ 


1 - 


1 


I _ 


1 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 


- 1 


1 


















11. With pellagra ...... 






















12. With other somatic diseases 










- 2 


2 


- 1 


1 


- 1 


1 


13. Manic-depressive ..... 


_ _ 


_ 


- 1 


1 


1 1 


2 






- 3 


3 


14. Involution melancholia .... 














- 2 


2 






15. Dementia praecox ..... 


2 - 


2 


- 1 


1 


2 3 


5 










16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 






















17. Epileptic psychoses ..... 






















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 






- 1 


1 














19. With psychopathic personality 










- 1 


1 










20. With mental deficiency .... 














1 - 


1 






21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 


1 - 


1 






- 1 


1 










22. Without psychosis 


1 - 


1 


1 - 


1 


2 1 


3 


- 1 


1 






Total 


4 1 


5 


3 3 


6 


8 9 17 


2 4 6 


1 6 


7 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded. 



Psychoses. 


55-59 
years. 


60-64 
years. 


65-69 
years. 


70 years 
and over. 


Unascer- 
tained. 


1. Traumatic 

2. Senile ... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis .... 

6. With Huntington's chorea .... 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous diseases 

9. Alcoholic 

10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 

11. With pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia .... 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 

17. Epileptic psychoses 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality 

20. With mental deficiency .... 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 

22. Without psychosis 

Total 


M. F. T. 
1 1 2 


M. F. T. 

2-2 

- 1 1 
1 - 1 


M. F. T. 

- 1 1 
1 1 2 


M. F. T. 

3 6 9 
3 2 5 

2-2 

- 1 1 
1 - 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
^' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 2 


3 1 4 


1 2 3 


9 9 18 





26 



P.D. 70 




I 

I 

i P.D. 70 27 

Table 10. Environment of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses. 



Psychoses, 




Tota 




Urban. 




Rural 




Unascer- 
tained. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. Traumatic 






















2. Senile . 


5 


9 


14 


5 


8 


13 


- 


1 


1 


_ _ _ 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 


3 


7 


3 


3 


6 


1 




1 


_ _ _ 


4. General paralysis ........ 


4 




4 


4 




4 










5. With cerebral syphilis . 






















6. With Huntington s chorea ...... 






















7. With brain tumor 






















8. W ith other bram or nervous diseases .... 






















9. Alcoholic ......... 


5 




5 


5 


_ 


5 










10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




1 


1 




1 


1 










11. With pellagra 






















12. With other somatic diseases ..... 


1 


5 


6 


1 


3 


4 




2 


2 


_ _ _ 


13. Manic-depressive . 


1 


6 


7 


1 


5 


6 




1 


1 


_ _ _ 


14. Involution melancholia ...... 




3 


3 




2 


2 




1 


1 




15. Dementia prsecox 


6 


5 


11 


5 


5 


10 


1 




1 




16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 






















17. Epileptic psychoses 






















18. Psyclionctiroscs 3(11(1 n6iiroscs ..... 


I 


I 


2 


1 


1 


2 










19. With psychopathic personality 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 










20. With mental deficiency 


1 




1 


1 




1 










21. Undiagnosed psychoses ...... 


2 


2 


4 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 




22. Without psychosis 


7 


4 


11 


6 


3 


9 


1 


1 


2 




Total 


38 


40 


78 


35 


33 


68 


3 


7 


10 





Table 11. Economic Condition of First Admissions Classified with 
Reference to Principal Pscy hoses. 



PSTCHOSES. 




Total 




Dependent. 


Marginal. 


Com- 
fortable. 


Unascer- 
tamed. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. Traumatic 




























2. Senile 


5 


9 


14 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


2 


4 


6 


- 1 1 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 


3 


7 










1 


1 


4 


2 


6 




4. General paralysis 


4 




4 








2 




2 


2 




2 




5. With cerebral syphilis .... 




























6. With Huntington's chorea 




























7. With brain tumor ..... 




























8. With other brain or nervous diseases . 




























9. Alcoholic ...... 


5 




5 


1 




1 


3 




3 


1 




1 




10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




1 


1 










1 


1 










11. With pellagra ...... 




























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


5 


6 








1 


2 


3 




3 


3 




13. Manic-depressive ..... 


1 


6 


7 














1 


5 


6 


- 1 1 


14. Involution melancholia .... 




3 


3 










3 


3 










15. Dementia-prsecox ..... 


6 


5 


11 


2 




2 


4 


4 


8 




1 


1 




16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




























17. Epileptic psychoses 




























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


1 


2 








1 




1 




1 


1 




19. With psychopathic personality . 


1 


1 


2 








1 




1 




1 


1 




20. With mental deficiency .... 


1 




1 








1 




1 










21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 


2 


2 


4 








1 




1 


1 


2 


3 




22. Without psychosis 


7 


4 


11 


4 


2 


6 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 




Total 


38 


40 


78 


8 


4 


12 


17 


14 


31 


13 


20 


33 


- 2 2 



28 P.D. 70 



Table 12. Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified with Reference 
to Principal Psychoses. 



xSYCHOSES. 


Total. 


Abstinent. 


Temperate. 


Intem- 
perate. 


Unascer- 
tained. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F, 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 






























2. Senile 


5 


9 


14 


_ 


6 


6 


4 


2 


6 


1 - 


1 


_ J 


1 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 


3 


7 


3 


2 


5 




1 


1 


1 - 


1 


_ 






4 




4 


1 




1 


2 




2 


1 - 


1 


_ _ 


_ 


5. With cerebral syphiUs .... 




























6. With Huntiagton's chorea 




























7. With brain tumor 




























8. With other brain or nervous diseases . 






























5 


_ 


5 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 - 


5 


_ 


_ 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 




1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 
















11. With pellagra ...... 




























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 
















13. Manic-depressive 


1 


6 


7 




3 


3 




3 


3 


1 


1 






14. Involution melancholia .... 




3 


3 




2 


2 












- 1 


1 


15. Dementia prsecox ..... 


6 


5 


11 


1 


4 


5 


5 


1 


6 










16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




























17. Epileptic psychoses ..... 




























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 


1 










19. With psychopathic personality . 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 
















20. With mental deficiency .... 


1 




1 








1 




1 










21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 


2 


2 


4 




2 


2 


2 




2 












7 


4 


11 


5 


3 


8 


1 


1 


2 


1 - 


1 






Total 


38 


40 


78 


13 


29 


42 


15 


9 


24 


10 - 


10 


- 2 


2 



P.D. 70 



29 



CO 



i.2 



III 

fcC 5 



I l-H,-(^COX 

I I ^ I ^(N 
I .-I I i-H(N to 



>5 
"2 ."S 



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■So.2 

0) (B O 



« S i= ^ bp o-g-^ >. 



Cf-u 5 = C.J ^.^ § >> o g^T 



„^ O C 



II 

C; 



30 P.D. 70 

Table 14. Psychoses of Readmissions. 

Psychoses. Males. Females. Total. 

1. Traumatic psychoses .......... . - - 

2. Senile psychoses .......... . 2 2 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis. ....... - - 

4. General paralysis .......... . - - 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis ......... - - 

6. Psychoses with. Huntington's chorea ........ - - 

7. Psychoses with brain tiunor ......... - - 

8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases ...... - - 

9. Alcoholic psychoses .......... . - - 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins .... - - - 



11. Psychoses with pellagra ......... . - - 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases ....... 1 - 1 

13. Manic-depressive psychoses . ........ 2 2 4 

14. Involution melancholia ......... . 1 1 

15. Dementia praecox ..........3 3 6 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions ........ - - 

17. Epileptic psychoses .......... . - - 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses ........ 1 - 1 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality ....... - - 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency ........ - - 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses ...... ... . - - 

22. Without psychosis .......... . 1 1 

Total 7 9 16 



Table 15. Discharges of Patients Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 

and Condition on Discharge. 



Psychoses. 


Total. 


Recovered. 


Improved. 


Unimproved. 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. Traumatic ...... 
























2. Senile 




1 


1 
















1 1 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 1 


4. General paraly.>*is ..... 


1 




1 








1 




1 






5. With cerebral syphilis .... 
























6. With Himtington's chorea 
























7. With brain tvunor .... 
























8. With other brain or nervous diseases 
























9. Alcoholic ...... 


2 




2 


2 




2 












10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 1 


11. With pellagra ..... 
























12. With other somatic diseases . 


2 


2 


4 


2 




2 




1 


1 




1 1 


13. Manic-depressive ..... 


1 


2 


3 








1 


1 


2 




1 1 


14. Involution melancholia .... 




2 


2 










2 


2 






15. Dementia praecox .... 


4 


8 


12 








1 


4 


5 


3 


4 7 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 
























17. Epileptic psychoses .... 
























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 










1 


1 






19. With psychopathic personality 




3 


3 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 1 


20. With mental deficiency 
























21. Undiagnosed psychoses 




1 


1 










1 


1 






22. Without psychosis .... 


1 


1 


2 


















Total 


11 


25 


36 


4 


1 


5 


3 


13 


16 


3 


10 13 



P.D. 70 



31 



;3i 



•(S> 

•S 



5| 



It 



a M 



S fc fc 



r-H <M ^ CC 



lO ^ 00 Ui CO 



r ^ CM , 



I I <oco 1-1^ i-H »-4 



I 



* I i s ^ 



'III II 



.1 <S 

s 
s 



'5^ 



•as i § *^ 

11 II iJ 1 
otj a-S coj tc 



IJ 

|6 



32 P.D. 70 

Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses. 



Psychoses. 



Total. 



30-34 
years. 



35-39 
years. 



40-44 
years. 



45-49 
years. 



1. Traumatic 

2. Senile 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral syphilis 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous 

diseases 

9. Alcoholic 

10. Due to drugs and other ex- 

ogenous toxins 

11. With pellagra . 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia prgecox 

16. Paranoia and paranoid con 

ditions . 

17. Epileptic psychoses 

18. Psychoneuroses and neu- 

roses 

19. With psychopathic per- 

sonality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses 

22. Without psychosis 

Total . . . 



M. 



21 23 44 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



1 1 



2 13 



2 2 4 



Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded. 



Psychoses. 


50-54 
years. 


55-59 
years. 


60-64 
years. 


65-69 
years. 


70 years 
and over. 




M. F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic 






























2. Senile .... 
























2 


5 


7 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 
























4 




4 


4. General paralysis 






























5. With cerebral syphilis 

6. With Huntington's chorea . 


























































7. With brain tumor 






























8. With other brain or nervous 






























diseases .... 
9. Alcoholic .... 






1 




1 








1 




1 


2 




2 


10. Due to drugs and other ex- 






























ogenous toxins . 






























11. With pellagra 






























12. With other somatic diseases 






1 




1 




















13. Manic-depressive 


- 1 


1 


























14. Involution melancholia 














3 


3 










1 


1 


15. Dementia prsecox 


- 1 


1 








1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


16. Paranoia and paranoid con- 






























ditions .... 






























17. Epileptic psychoses 






























18. Psychonexiroses and neu- 






























roses .... 






























19. With psychopathic person- 

ality .... 

20. With mental deficiency 


























































21. Undiagnosed psychoses 


























1 


1 


22. Without psychosis 












1 




1 










Total .... 


- 2 


2 


2 




2 


2 


4 


6 


2 


1 


3 


9 


10 


19 



00 o 



2 



^ I I 00 



i 2 



c3 cS S3 C 



g O 05 « 



i-"C^C<5TMO;Ot>.OOOSO' 



j3 

O O 

i"© o a o i, 
, o S3 



.2 



5 2 >.2. 

a S Si M 



S g o >.s 

,2-2 OS H § d " 
^ S 55 ft^^i? a-^ r° 



34 



P.D. 70 



si 



I c3 

CO 0) 



I (3 



§ 2 >>2 
£ § 
art o 



i i. 



O C3 O 



iH M ;i — c 
« t> W ^ C 



o o a o 



I ^-g >. o o 



(U to o 



3-5 >. 



P.D. 70 



35 



Table 19. Family Care Department. 



Remaining in Family Care Oct. 1. 1927 . 
On visit from Family Care Oct. 1. 1927 
Admitted during the year 
Whole number of cases w-ithin the year 
Dismissed within the year 

Returned to institution 

Discharged (Transferred and died) 

On visit ...... 

Remaining in Family Care Oct. 1, 1928 

Supported by State ... 

Private ...... 

Self-supporting ..... 
Number of different persons within the year 
Number of difTerent persons dismissed 
Niunber of different persons admitted from Family Care 
Average daily number in Family Care during the year: 

Supported by State ...... 

Private ........ 

Self-supporting ....... 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


10 


46 


56 


23 


36 


59 


33 


82 


115 


15 


54 


69 




40 


55 




14 


14 


IS 


2S 


46 


14 


20 


40 


4 


2 


6 


24 


52 


76 


19 


30 


49 


15 


46 


61 


V?. 178 


42.314 


54.492 


2.357 


3.904 


6.261 



Public Document 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



22^ 

' NS. 70 



OF THE 



Gardner State Colony 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1929 



Depaetmext OF Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Document appkovkd by the Commission on Administka.tion 

AND Finance 

BOO— 7-30. Order 9479 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARONER STATE COLONY 
GARDNER. MASS. 



8 lOC/'^ 

GARDNER STATE COLONY 



^ BOARP OF TIWST^:ES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston, Mass. 
Mrs. Annie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester. . 
Thomas R. P. Gibb, Rockport, Mass. -,„ OFFICIALS' 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner, Mass. 
Miss Grace Nichols, Boston, Mass. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg, Mass. 
George A. Marshall, Fitchburg, Mass. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS . 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
LoNNiE O. Farrar, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Senior Physician. 
Harold K. Marshall, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mary Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. Marr, Steward. 
Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
Ethel M. Hall, Soda? Service Worker. 



DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
Newton E, SMAL.i.yvooi), Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Neilson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
Anthony Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Elof R. Teir, Supervisor of Printing. 



SUPERVISORS 
Gladys C. Ripley, R.N., Women's Infirmary 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kf.nnedy, R.N., Hospital Building. 
Elvira I. Y/inchenbach, R.N., Treatment Building. 



Matronf? 
Mrs. Gladys Bennett 
Mrs. Myrtie S^rague 
Mrs. Mertie Morse 
Mrs. Minnie Larkin 
Mrs. Bf: REN Morse 
Mrs. AniAiE Lane 
Miss Bernadette Brunette 
Miss Helen Batchelder 



Rev3 James T. 



Colonies 
Belcher Cottage 
Hillcrest Cottage 
Valley Cottage 
Gardner Cottage 
Westminster Cottages 
Fair view Cottage 
Overlook Cottage 
Highland Cottage 
Wachusett Cottage 



Supervisors 

William Bennett 
Streeter G. Sprague 
Fred Morse 
Herbert J. Larkin 
Merrill Morse 



Fletcher Mann 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES ' 
Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant 



P.D. 70 3 

TRUSTEES' REPORT 
ii IS Excellency, the Governor and the Honorable Council: 
The Trustees of the Gardner State Colony present their twenty-seventh annual 
report. 

We are glad to record that the building for intensive treatment of men is well 
under way toward completion. When it is finished it will be of the greatest assist- 
ance in the care of our patients. 

In addition to ordinary and extraordinary repairs and renewals there are certain 
needs of the Colony which are outstanding. These are — 

1. A hospital building for men. 

2. The construction of an entirely new cow tie-up in a new location. 

3. A Superintendent's house. 

4. Replacing of buildings of two Colonies, now in uncomfortable and inadequate 
old farm houses. 

5. Employees' and officers' cottages. 

6. Additional Colonies. 

The reason for the new cow tie-up is because of the very considerable danger 
which exists of losing a very valuable herd of cows in case of fire. The stable and 
and hay mows are in a building continuous with the cow barn. The contents of 
the building are highly inflammable. A fire would be so speedy that in all proba- 
bility the cows could not be saved. In addition to this, the close proximity of the 
stable to the barn is not the most sanitary of arrangements. 

When the Colony was built the theory was that a new Colony would be added 
every year or every second year for a considerable period. It has now been sixteen 
years since a new Colony was established. It is true that in 1916 and again in 1918 
farms were purchased and patients installed in them without kitchen and dining 
room facilities. These can hardly be considered as suitable Colonies. It appears 
to the Trustees that it would be to the advantage of the Commonwealth to increase 
its facilities for the care of patients able to work by this method, which is com- 
paratively inexpensive and beneficial to the patients. The Trustees would strongly 
recommend the establishment of additional Colonies at this institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman Owen A. Hoban 
George A. Marshall Grace Nichols 

Thomas H. Shea Amie H. Coes, Secretary. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

Presented herewith is my Annual Report of the operation of the Gardner State 
Colony for the year ending September 30, 1929. Matters relating to finances are 
for the year ending November 30. 



Relating to Patients 

There were 1,195 patients on record September 30, 1928. Of these 1,150 were 
resident at the Colony and 45 were in "Family Care." 

There were admitted during the year 163. Of these 60 were men and 103 were 
women. Of these, 117 were direct admissions and 46 v/ere received by transfer. 
Of the 117 direct admissions 94 were admitted for the first time to any hospital. 

There were 124 discharged during the year as follows: 59 died, 65 returned to 
their homes. Of the 65 returned to home life, 13 or 20% were discharged as re- 
covered; 23 or 35% were discharged as improved; 13 or 20% not improved; 12 
or 19% were without psychosis; 4 or 6% were transferred to other hospitals. 

The causes of death in the 59 cases who died were: heart conditions, 25; pul- 
monary tuberculosis, 4; cerebral hemorrhage, 5; pneumonia, 4; the remainder 
from miscellaneous physical conditions including one death by suicide. 

The ages at death in order of frequency were, 24 over 70 years of age; 16 be- 
tween 60 and 70 years; 8 between 50 and 60 years; 6 between 40 and 50 years; 



4 



P.D. 70 



1 between 30 and 40 years. It will be seen that 70% were over 60 years of age 
at the time of death. This again brings attention to the fact that length of life is 
if anything increased in residents of state hospitals and that death most often 
occurs from causes incident to advancing years and not from mental conditions. 

There remained at the end of the year, September 30, 1929, resident at the 
Colony, 1,111 patients, 62 were cared for in Family Care while 61 were on visit 
or absent from the institution, making the number on our books September 30, 
1,234. 

Family Care 

The Family Care system of placing patients in families in rural communities has 
been successfully and advantageously continued. The patients in these homes have 
all been visited by me during the year and conditions were found to be very satis- 
factory. In certain instances some questions arose as to the vsJlue of the patients 
remaining in these homes and living under rather primitive conditions. In each 
case the answer seemed to be that the patients are better satisfied in these homes 
than in the hospital where the surroundings, supervision and living conditions are 
better. This, presumably is due to the fact that patients of this particular type 
were formerly not used to conditions different and prefer simple life to the orderly 
routine and cleanliness of the hospital. 

On September 30, 1928, we had in Family Care 45 patients. Seventeen of these 
were men and 38 were women. This number has been increased during the year 
so that on September 30, 1929, we had 62 resident in Family Care, 12 men, and 
50 women. Fifty-seven of these are supported at the expense of the state at $4.50 
per week and 5 are self-supporting. 

General 

Fifteen major surgical operations were performed by the consulting surgeons 
during the year. 

In the Out-Patient Department 58 patients were seen in consultation. Fifteen 
of these were sent to the clinic by the family physician or came for advice. 

Twenty-eight were seen in consultation with a physician at the home of the 
patient. Commitment was recommended in 27 instances. 

Examination of backward children in the public schools has been continued and 
164 individual children have been examined. Of these 72 were found to be feeble- 
minded; 43 recommended for special classes; 16 for institutional care; 6 to obtain 
paying positions; 12 to continue in ungraded classes and 2 to receive home care. 
These examinations of children in the public schools should be of great value to 
the school authorities in placing a child where the best progress may be made or 
where the progress of others may not be hindered. There still seems to be reti- 
cence on the part of school superintendents to establish special classes. Pre- 
sumably this is because of added expense and the need of a special organization. 

Treatment 

The departments of Personal Hygiene, Physical Therapy, and Hydrotherapy 
have been very active during the year. Of special interest is the fact that the 
number of treatments by hydrotherapy were reduced one half during the summer 
and fall when a group of 30 disturbed women were occupied at the cannery de- 
partment. Special arrangements were made for the attendance and supervision 
of these patients at the cannery, out of doors. The largest amount of canning in 
any year has been done. Attendance was not required but it was considered a 
privilege to attend with the result that the disturbed patients themselves requested 
permission to be so occupied. Because of this beneficial effect, the cannery has run 
later in the fall than usual. This experiment again shows us that a certain type of 
patient who of necessity requires much supervision will benefit greatly when we are 
able to construct out of door enclosed spaces for them and this planned out of door 
occupation and diversion I am convinced will make unnecessary much hydro- 
therapy. 



P.D. 70 



5 



Occupational Therapy 
The operation of the occupational therapy part of treatment has received special 
attention both for the occupational feature and in its special therapy feature. 
The majority of our patients are suffering from chronic conditions and these have 
greater interest in productive occupation. Occupation as therapy has been es- 
pecially active in the more recent and hopeful cases. It has been our experience 
that those patients who are in need of continued care are not as a rule interested 
in simple occupational therapy methods; that is, in those patients suffering from 
diseases of a chronic nature there is not the same interest in occupational therapy 
as there is in productive and constructive occupation. Because of this we have 
developed and have continued to develop the constructive side of the occupational 
therapy department.* It seems to us that it is more important that they should 
be occupied in interesting and constructive occupation which helps in providing 
materials for themselves and others than it is to insist upon their being occupied 
in class work. The therapeutic side has been used more and more in the treatment 
of acute or recoverable cases but has not been stressed in the continued care cases 
as a whole. We have not been complacent in turning out good finished products 
with only slightly improved patients but we have not permitted classes to be 
carried on month after month v/ithout a definite purpose. A prescription is 
written for each and every patient after careful consideration of the patient at 
Staff Meeting and supervision is continued by a psychiatrist. 

General Medical 

An additional physician has been added to the Staff. William A. Hunter, M.D., 
a graduate of McGill University Medical School was appointed September 27, 1929. 

There have been ten public gatherings addressed by members of the Staff. 

A course of eight lectures was given to the teachers of the public schools of 
Fitchburg under the auspices of the Department of Education and the Massa- 
chusetts Society for Mental Hygiene. 

Several groups have held meetings here as follows: The superintendents, stewards 
and head farms of all hospitals under the Department of Mental Diseases; The 
Gardner Rotary Club; The Worcester North District Medical Society; the local 
order of Sons of Veterans; The Wachusett Dental Society. 

Following the meeting of the Gardner Rotary Club, the club unanimously adopted 
as its work for the coming year a "Better Mental Health" program and has appro- 
priated a sum of $500 for a series of eight public lectures to be given during the 
coming winter. These lectures will begin January 15 open to the public and 
lecturers of note have been selected. 

This hospital has been accepted by the Council on Medical Education and listed 
as an institution approved as providing satisfactory residence in neUro-psychiatry. 

Dental 

In the dental department 3,684 patients were seen, examined or treated. Pro- 
phylaxis treatment was given in 2, 336 cases; extractions in 532; special treatment 
for pyorrhea and similar conditions in 462 cases. Fillings and plate work, 349. 

Diversion 

Motion pictures were shown weekly during the winter and provided the form of 
entertainment most enjoyed. Dances were held at regular intervals. Baseball 
games were played twice a week during the summer months. The band gave 
concerts every other week during the summer. Special programs were carried out 
for Easter, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Fourth of July and New Years. An all day 
out of door program on July Fourth and Field Day in October were especially 
enjoyed. The Merry-Go-Round on these occasions added much. 

Farm 

In spite of the continuous dry summer the farm operations were more successful 
than ever before. The value of all farm products was $91,116.23. There were 
11,074 gallons of farm produce canned at the Cannery in various size contkiners. 

•For lists of articles made, see page 7. 



6 



P.D. 70 



The entire herd of cattle were given the Federal Tuberculin Test in November 
1928 when all passed and again in November, 1929, when all passed. 

Contagious abortion in the herd which was especially troublesome in previous 
years resulted in two abortions this year. We have continued the policy of im- 
mediate removal of aborters from the herd. 

Mammitis among the cows has been more prevalent. These cows have been 
removed from the herd. This seems to be a disease which is becoming more pre- 
valent throughout the country and is giving considerable concern. 

There was an outbreak of hog cholera in December of last year when 56 young 
pigs were lost before the outbreak was under control. 

The raising of turkeys, rabbits, geese for food has proved very successful. The 
poultry department has been more successful than in any previous year. 

Fifty thousand feet of lumber was cut from timber lots and sawed in our mill. 

Reforestration has continued as in previous year; 5,000 red pine seedlings, 
5,000 white pine seedlings and 5,000 Norway spruce seedlings were set out. 

The usual amount of clearing of fields, road wor\5. and construction of walks 
has been done as follows: 6,954 tons of stones were removed from fields; 3,680 
tons of rock excavated; 3,774 cu. yds. of earth excavated with which 2,333 sq. yds. 
of road have been rebuilt; 5,195 sq. yds. of road re-surfaced; 350 sq. yds. of walks 
resurfaced; 165 sq. yds. of walk built; 2,422 sq. yds. grading; 2,000 cu. yds. of 
stone were crushed in the stone crusher; 763^ acres of land have been cleared of 
underbrush and 8 acres cleared and put into fields. 

General Construction 

Special Appropriations. 

An appropriation of $3,000 was granted for the construction of a dairy building 
for the care and preparation of milk. This building is being constructed by our 
own labor and is now nearing completion. 

An appropriation of $150,000 was granted for the construction of a "Treatment 
Building for Men ' ' . This building is now under construction by contract and should 
be ready for occupancy April 1, 1930. The outstanding features of this building 
are the facilities for hydrotherapeutic treatment including one room with special 
equipment for colonic irrigation which form of treatment seems well worth trying 
out. 

An appropriation for the construction of a sidetrack and coal trestle at the Power 
House was granted two years ago but no progress has been made in construction 
as it has been impossible to obtain a plan satisfactory to the Boston and Maine 
Railroad which will allow for construction within the appropriation granted. 

Unusual Repairs and Renewals. 
A salvage yard building has been constructed. 

Terrazzo floors have replaced wood floors in the day room and single rooms in a 
portion of the Women's Infirmary. 

A new steam heater has been installed at the Valley House Annex. 
New equipment for the library has been installed. 

Metal grills and doors have been installed at the hospital building and the Men's 
and Women's Infirmaries. 

Ten buildings have been painted. 

Asbestos shingles replacing wood shingles have been applied to the roofs of the 
Highland Cottage, Hillcrest Cottage, Overlook Cottage, two dormitories at the 
Westminster Cottages, one dormitory at the Gardner Cottages, and the cow barn. 

Sprinkler systems have been installed in the attics and hallways of the Men's 
and Women's Infirmaries and the X-ray room. 

Four boilers have been repaired. 

A fireproof addition to the Men's Industrial Building has been built for the 
storage of lumber and supplies. 

Extensive repairs to the coal trestle have been made. 

The chimney at the central power plant has been re-painted and lightning rod 
renewed. 



P.D. 70 



7 



Entrances to the vegetable cellars at the Gardner Cottages, Westminster Cottages 

and the Valley House have been re-built. 

The subway has been extended to the Ash Cottage. 

A rubberstone flooring has been applied in the patients' congregate dining-room. 

The telephone cable has been extended 400 ft. to the entrance of the grounds 
doing away with poles and overhead wires. 

The filter beds under construction and nearing completion last year have been 
completed. 

Two bungalows under construction last year have been completed and are now 
occupied by two physicians and their families. 

Special Appropriation Requests for 1930 

1. $15,000 for the construction of a coal pocket and railway siding. 

2. $10,000 for a Printery Building. When this building is constructed it will 
house the printing industry of the Department of Mental Diseases where all printing 
for the various hospitals and Department is done. The space vacated will be used 
in part for extension of the textile industry and in part for a mending room. 

3. $12,000 for an employees cottage which will house twelve. This will be 
needed to operate the new Treatment Building now under construction. 

4. $5,000 for the installation of a fire alarm box, fire alarm connection with the 
city of Gardner, and the beginning of the installation of a local fire alarm system. 

In conclusion I take this opportunity to express my thanks to those many friends 
who have donated books, magazines, and special articles for the benefit of the 
patients during the year. 

To each member of the official staff of the Colony and to you the members of 
the Board of Trustees individually I wish to express my fullest appreciation of 
your assistance and support during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 
Work done by Women. 
Aprons, various kinds, 718; abdominal binders, 20; bags, various kinds, 477; 
balls, yarn, 2; bibs, 276; blankets, patients', 218; burial robes, 43; bed socks, 12; 
bathrobes, 44; bed puffs, 4; books, scrap, 4; bloomers, 3; bandages, 12; buffet 
sets, 2; bed spreads, 190; bed, canvas frame, 1 ; boquets, old fashioned, 2; bonnets, 
crepe paper, 4; coat hangers, 6; cases, thimble, 15; curtain pulls, 44; caps, men's, 
488; caps, dairy, 12; chemises, 537; corset covers, 4; coats, dispensary, 45; coats, 
waitress's, 12; combination suits, 280; curtains, unbleached cotton, 79; curtains, 
screen, 18; curtains, scrim, 145; curtain, burlap, 1; cushions, chair back, 82; 
cap, velvet, 1; coats, dairy, 25; cap, boudoir, 1; centerpieces, 15; covers, em- 
broidered table, 4; covers, embroidered bureau, 2; cases, handkerchief, 5; cloth, 
silence, 1; caps, surgeon, 12; covers, tub, 36; cases, thimble, 47; covers, oilcloth 
head rest, 3; covers, oilcloth chair cushion, 6; curtain, cretonne, 25; cover, window 
seat, 1; doilies, 398; diapers, 203; dresses, gingham, 731; dresses, strong cloth, 89; 
dish cloths, 5; dresses, waitress's, 2; draperies, over, 8; dolls, 21; door stops, 5; 
hospital gowns, 13; handkerchiefs, painted, 5; handkerchiefs, 1,286; holders, 230; 
jumpers, 289; jacket, 1; lunchcloths, 7 ; mittens, 613; mattress ticks, 126; mat 
silk, 1; mattress, special, 4; neckties, 949; nightgowns, 967; night shirts, 255; 
napkins, table, 12; needle books, 32; overalls, 367; overalls, dairy, 24; pin 
cushions, 2; pencil cases, doll, 2; pads, kitchen, 11; petticoats, 313; pillow slips, 
patients', 1,135; pillow slips, officers', 790; pillows, embroidered, etc., 67; pillow, 
boudoir, 1; quilts, patchwork, 6; raffia trays and baskets, 40; rugs, crocheted, 8; 
rugs, hooked, 78; rugs, braided, 316; rugs, woven, 34; rug, cross-stitched, 1; shoe 
tops, women's, 175; shoe tops, men's, 351; sheets, officers', 840; sheets, patients', 1,- 
982; sheets, pack, 157 ; shirts, men's outside, 540; scarfs, 2; socks, 5,576; sweaters, 3; 
suspenders, 425; shawl, fireman's, 1; slips, 7; skirt, dress, 1; sheet spray, 1; 



8 



P.D. 70 



slipper tops, women's, 77; surgeons gowns, 13; tablecloths, 74; trousers, 864; 
towels, dish, 1,652; towels, officers, 1,293; towels, patients, 1,904; towels, sani- 
tary, 2,106; tie backs, 148; ticks, pillow, 132; underdrawers, men's, 362; under- 
drawers, women's, 254; underdrawers, cotton, 310; undershirts, men's, 564; 
undershirts, women's, 651; vanity sets, 4; valances, cretonne, 65; waste baskets, 
2; wash cloths, knit, 229; woven material, yards, 10 J^. 

Articles Completed at the Women's Industrial Building 
Repaired and Mended 
Aprons, 397; blankets, 117; jumpers, 1,242; overalls, 2,108; nightgowns, 709; 
rugs, 83; outside shirts, 2,974; men's undershirts, 1,162; men's unionsuit, 306; 
bedspreads, 55; chemise, 94; dresses, 313; flags, 23; laundry bags, 80; pillow 
slips, 45; sweaters, 67; men's underdrawers, 1,812; surgeon's gowns, 5; tub covers, 
64; tub hammocks, 20; bathrobes, 10; sitz aprons, 27; cushion tops, 1; women's 
undershirts, 24; petticoats, 227; coats, 987; trousers, 1,641; tray cloths, 3; 
combinations, 2; sheets, 114; women's underdrawers, 61; towels, 412; curtains, 
6; vests, 61; caps, 7; valances, 7; stockings, 11,568; uniforms, 7; bed puffs, 6; 
doilies, 9; table cloths, 12; napkins, 5; pot holder, 1; B. V. D.'s, 4; hospital shirts, 
35; curtains, 4; mattress ticks, 5; corset covers, 16. 

Fancy Work, Embroidery, etc. 
Doilies, 186; centerpieces, 10; table napkins, 24; buffet sets, 5; bureau covers, 
25; towels, 4; chair backs, 3 ; pot holders, 2 ; curtain pulls, 5 ; sofa pillows painted, 
5; sofa pillows embroidered, 17; pillow tops, 11; lunch cloth, 1; vanity sets, 2; 
aprons, 4; bibs, 4; hair pin lace, yards, 10^; crocheted yoke, 1; hand bags, 2; 
holders, 3; raffia baskets, 9; crepe paper flowers, 196; crepe paper baskets, 29; 
spools of tape, 57; rags, yards, 928^; burlap, 3193^; curtains, 39; runners, 10; 
valances, 22; cushions, 12; tie backs, 34. 

Stamped Goods 

Runners, 10; centerpieces, 10; doilies, 45; lunch cloths, 2; table napkins 3; 
buffet sets, 3; hand bag, 1; tea tray cover, 1; towel ends, 2; pillow tops, 13; scarf 
ends, 4; cushion top, 1; patterns, perforated, 7; vanity sets, 3; aprons, 3; oil 
pictures, 15; painted pictures, 2. 

Laces Made. 

Crocheted lace, 67 yards; tatting, 40 years; bead flowers, 61; tatted collar, 1. 

Dyed Material 

Place cards, 4; envelopes, crepe paper, 114; umbrellas, crepe paper, 2; burlap, 
yards, 252; rags, yards, 796; spool rope, yards, 25; portiers, 2; curtains, 3. 

Furniture Department 

Articles Produced: Pin rack made for office dish, 1; box with handle, 1; key 
board with 12 hooks, 1; folding screen, 1; bins for shoe department, 14; wood 
shoe shanks, 700; waste baskets, 60. 

Articles Repaired: Mane and tail brush backs, 100; scrub brush backs, 90; bed 
screens, 7; desks, 4; tables, 95; long handled brushes, 1; wheelbarrow, 1; swab 
handles, 17; screen frames, 7; dish, 1; library seats, 9; hair clippers, 1; chairs, 
869; knives, 9; letters, 12; towel racks, 1; clocks, 4; locks, 15; loom, 1; curtain 
rods, 8; scissors, sharpened, 58; sewing machines, 16; shades, 215; victrolers, 19; 
dressers, 19; couches, 3; piano, 1; wheel chair, 1; auto rec. holder, 1; medicine 
cabinet, 1; shoe blocking, 1; frames, 2; barber chairs, 2 ; settees, 13; floor polisher, 
1 ; stool, 1 ; crate, 1 ; rug horse, 1 ; foot rest for power machine, 1 ; double curtain 
rods, 37. 

Shoe Department 

Articles Produced: Women's shoes, 213; men's shoes, 604; men's slippers, 75; 
women's slippers, 16; brogans, 282; white canvas shoes, 36; rubber aprons, 6. 

Articles Repaired or Cut: Curtains, 12; rivets, 8; mittens cut, 385; floor mats, 1; 
grommets, 917 ; martingales, 1; eyelets, rubber shoe, 55; fire bucket, 1; hand bag, 



P.D. 70 



9 



1; traces, 2; straps, 3; express breeching, 4; girth, 1; rubber sheets, 3; rubber 
mattress covers, 6; officers shoes, 296; patients shoes, 2,367; base ball shoes, 2; 
hame straps, 6; slippers, 16; arch supports, 2; team harnesses, single, 16; auto 
curtains, 8; auto blanket, 1; suspender tips, 456; fan belts, 2; shin guards, 1; 
breast collars, 2; halters, 6; harnesses, double, 9; horse blankets, 4; auto door 
straps, 2; innersoles, 8; dinner boxes, 2; desk pad, 1; belt buckle, 4; harness 
leather pieces, 1. 

Tailor Department 

Articles Produced: Coats, 709; trousers, 96; vests, 31; 3 piece suits, 16; over- 
coats, 2; reefers, 86. 

Article Cut or Repaired: Trousers, 960; coats, 82; dresses, 74; vests, 7; suits, 
8; overalls, 67; jumpers, 66; night shirts, 55; night gowns, 194; men's undershirts, 
32; caps, 55; bathrobes, 17; burial robes, 25; chemises, 95; women's drawers, 34; 
reefers, 20; overcoat, 1; combination suits, 58; window shades, 34; patients 
clothing pressed, 272; caps, pressed, 58; officers clothing pressed, 121; snow 
plow cloth repaired, 1. 

Textile Department 
Articles Produced: Socks, 3,936; stockings, 1,062. Yards of strong cloth, 883 >^; 
ticking, 865; denim, 2,997; sheeting, 2,7733^; pocketing, 512 1^; gingham, 3,534; 
patients' blanketing, 492 3^; underwear, 2,368^; patients toweling, 1,215 3^; 
shirting, 3,1213^; bedspread material, 505. Cushions, 4; coat hangers, 156; cocoa 
mats, 5; reefer lining, 336; wood shanks for shoes, 1,705; house brooms, 626; 
picker sticks, 56; barn brooms, 164. Brushes; hand scrub, 32; long handled 
scrub, 432; long handled floor, 24; main and tail. 111. Mattresses, 27; bed 
pillows, 35; patients' pillows, 91; backs and cushions, 12; officers toweling, 1,040; 
patients toweling, 368 J^; hopper brushes, 278; small brushes, 18; floor brushes, 3; 
khaki cloth, 1,392; special mattresses, 8; hopper brush handles, 206; hopper brush 
heads, 182. 

Articles Repaired: Mattresses, 31; pillows, 8; chairs upholstered, 5; cushion 
seat repaired, 1. 

Preserves. Pickles., Etc. 
Vegetables: — Quarts of — asparagus, 9; beets, 75; string beans, S91H; shell 
beans, 793^; tomatoes, 108 K; green peas, 273; broccoli, 1; corn, 93^; swiss 
chard, 146; lima beans, 6; cranberry beans, 9; beet greens, 23; tomato mince- 
meat, 206; dandelion greens, 50; pumpkin, 2; carrots, 3; squash, 33)^; also swiss 
chard, 2 barrels. 

Fruit: — Quarts of — rhubarb, lOOH; raspberries, 217H; blueberries, 618M; 
blackberries, 157; pears, 221; gooseberries, 17^; peaches, 163^; strawberries, 
873^; plums, 34>^; strawberries and rhubarb, 12; crabapples, 6; currants, 2^. 

Pickles: — cucumbers, barrels, 43^; cucumber, whole, 479. Quarts of — sour 
cucumbers, 117; sweet cucumbers, 190; piccalilli, 4953^; pepper relish, 51; beets, 
108; pears, 4; sliced tomato, 247; mustard pickle, 110; thousand island pickles, 6; 
red pepper conserve, 23^; tomato and onion relish, 8; chili sauce, 50; chow chow, 
22; salted pickles, 40; tomato soy, 150; mixed pickles, 27. 

Jellies: — Glasses of — Currant, 78; raspberries, 106; blackberry, 46; straw- 
berry, 30; gooseberry, 15; apple, 159; grape, 110; grape marmalade, 22; cranberry 
5; apple and blackberry, 38; apple and grape, 36. 

Fruits and Vegetables Canned at Cannery 
Apples, 761 gals.; shell beans, 252 gals.; shell beans, 201 qts.; string beans, 
4,591 gals.; string beans, 208 qts.; carrots, 222 gals.; swiss chard, 1,320 gals.; 
sweet corn, 10,577 pts.; pears, 219 gals.; pears, 177 qts.; pumpkin, 90 gals.; 
winter squash, 591 gals.; tomatoes, 1,525 gals.; tomatoes, 198 qts.; tomatoes, 
55 pts. 

Soap Production 
Total pounds of soap produced, 10,2363^. 



10 



P.D. 70 



VALUATION 

November 30. 1929 
Real Estate 

Land. 1,856 acres $37,350.00 

Buildings 1,087.390.14 

$1,124.740. 14 

Personal Property 

Travel . transportation , etc $300 . 00 

Food 12,437.67 

Clothing and matierials 21,619.76 

Furnishings and household supplies 196,064.58 

Medical and general care 7,094.82 

Heat, light and power 7,517.55 

Farm 14,825.18 

Garage, stables and grounds 13,216.41 

Repairs 17.897.33 

$290,973.30 

Summary 

Real estate $1,124,740.14 

Personal property 290,973.30 

$1,415,713.44 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1929. 

Cash Account 
Receipts 

Income 

Board of patients $36,913.22 

$36,913.22 

Personal services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 170.00 

Sales : 

Food $2,853.37 

Clothing and materials 292.28 

Medical and general care — X-Ray 1 1 . 00 

Farm: 

Pigs and hogs 3 . 00 

Hides 117.69 

Repairs, ordinary — Keys 2 . 00 

Arts and crafts sales 821.99 

Barrels and junk 283.24 

Total sales $4,384.57 

Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balance 854 . 42 

Rejit 822.38 

Sundries, com. on telephone calls 26.31 

1.703.11 

Total income $43 . 1 70 . 90 

Maintenance 

Balance from previous year, brought forward $3,136.46 

Appropriations, current year 443,800.00 

Total $446,936.46 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 423,184. 18 

Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth $23,752.28 

Analysis of Expenses 

Personal services $201,748.90 

Religious instruction 1,384. 75 

Travel, transportation and office expenses 4,297.12 

Food 64.336.37 

Clothing and materials 14,845 . 55 

Furnishings and household supplies 21.135.66 

Medical and general care 20.733.41 

Heat, light and power 30,389.57 

Farm , 31,961.54 

Garage, stable and grounds 5,840.97 

Repairs ordinary • 15,712.76 

Repairs and renewals 10.797.58 



Total expenses for maintenance 



$423,184.18 



P.D. 70 



11 



Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1. 1928 $23,709.87 

Appropriations for current year 153,000.00 

Total $176,709.87 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $56,763.45 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 363. 14 

57,126.59 

Balance November 30, 1929, carried to next year $119,583.28 





A 

Act 




Expended 


1 otal 


Balance 


Ubject 




vv XlOic 


During 


Expended 


at End 




Resolve 


Amount 


Fiscal Year 


to Date 


of Year 




Building for Semi-Dist. Patients* . 


138-1927 


$150,000.00 


$3,367.61 


$149,999.30 


$.70 


79-1926 










Employees' Cottage* 


138-1927 


12,000.00 




11,797.40 


202.60 


Food Conveyors* .... 


79-1926 


3,850.00 




3.847.87 


2.13 


LaundryJMachinery* 


138-1927 


7,000.00 




6,842.29 


157.71 


Additional Filter Beds 


138-1927 


15,000.00 


1.163.64 


14,985.48 


14.52 




127-1928 










Officers' Cottages .... 


127-1928 


10,000.00 


1.828.94 


9,994.35 


5.65 


Coal Trestle and Side Track . 


127-1928 


10,700.00 


173.99 


173.99 


10,526.01 


Rep. Road Westminister . 


127-1928 


1,000.00 


933.72 


968.10 


31.90 


Additional Water Supply . 


126-1924 


42,000.00 


212.61 


36,911.86 


5,088.14 




398-1926 










Dairy Building Purposes . 


146-1929 


3,000.00 


2.991.90 


2,991.90 


8.10 


Building for Semi-Dist. Men . 


146-1929 


150.000.00 


46,091.04 


46,091.04 


103,908.96 






$404,550.00 


$56,763.45 


$284,603.58 


$119,946.42' 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with*) . . $363 . 1 4 

Balance carried to next year 119,583.28 

Total as above $119,946.42 



Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 1,101.235 (At Hospital) 

56.781 (Family Care) 



1,158.016 

Total cost for maintenance. $423,184.18 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $7.0276 (52 weeks to year) 

Receipt from sales. $4,384.57 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.0728 

All other institution receipts, $38,786.33 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.6441 

Net weekly per capita $6.3107 

Respectfully submitted, 
Gertrude W. 



Perry 
Treasurer. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 

Table 1. General Information 



Data correct at end of hospital year, November 30, 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant — Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings 

Personal property 



1929. 



$1,124,740.14 
290,973.30 



Total 

Total acreage of hospital property owned: 1,856. 



$1,415,713.44 



P.D. 70 



4. Officers and Employees: November 30, 1929 



Actually in Service at 
End of Year 



Vacancies at End 
of Year 







M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




Supenntendents 


1 




1 










Assistant physicians 


4 


1 


5 










Clinical assistants . 








1 




1 




Total physicians . 


, 


1 


6 


1 




1 




Stewards 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 




Resident dentists 


1 




1 










Pharmacists .... 


1 




1 






- 




Graduate nurses 




4 


4 










Other nurses and attendants. 


52 


46 


98 


2 


1 


3 




Occupational therapists 




4 


4 










Social workers 










1 


1 




All other officers and employees 


53 


47 


100 


2 


3 


5 




Total officers and employees 


113 


102 


215 


5 


5 


10 


Note: — The following items, 5-9 inclusive are for the year ended S 


eptember 30. 1929. 




5. 


Census of patient population at end of year: 






















Absent from Hospital 






Actually in Hospital 




but Still on 


Books 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




White 
















Insane 


587 


418 


1.005 


31 


74 


105 




Epileptic .... 










1 


1 




Mental defectives 


"47 


' "3i 


' ■ Ys 


" 4 


8 


12 




All other cases 


5 


1 


6 


4 


1 


5 




Total .... 


639 


450 


1,089 


39 


84 


123 




Other races: 
















Insane 


12 


9 


21 










Mental defectives 


1 




1 










Total .... 


13 


9 


22 










Grand Total .... 


652 


459 


1,111 


39 


84 


123 












Males 


Females 


Total 


6. 


Patients under treatment in occupational-therapy classes 


including 










physical training, on date of report 






42 


173 


215 


7. 


Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of re- 










port 






. 495 


163 


658 


8. 


Average daily number of all patients actually in hospital during year658. 537 


438.797 


1,097.334 


9. 


\'oluntary patients admitted during year 






5 


1 


6 


10. 


Person given advice or treatment in out-patient clinics during year 


27 


31 


58 



Table 2. Financial Statement 
See treasurer's report for data requested under this table 



P.D. 70 



13 



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14 P.D. 70 



Table 4. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 



Nativity 


Patients 


Parents of Male 
Patients 


Parents of Female 
Patients 
































Both 






Both 




M. 


F. 


T. 


Fathers 


Mothers Parents 


Fathers 


Mothers Parents 


United States 


18 


31 


49 


10 


7 


6 


18 


20 


17 


CTanada ^ , . . . 


4 




4 


5 


6 


5 


2 


1 


1 


England .... 


1 




2 








1 


2 


1 


Finlcind .... 


3 


6 


9 


5 


5 


5 


9 


9 


9 


Germany 










1 




























Greece 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 








Ireland 


1 


1 


2 


4 


4 


3 


2 


2 


2 


Italy 








1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


Xorvvay .... 




1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Poland 




1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Sweden .... 




2 


2 








2 


2 


2 


Other countries . 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Unascertained 








2 


3 


2 


5 


3 


2 


Total .... 


29 


44 


73 


29 


29 


24 


44 


44 


39 



'Includes Newfoundland. 



P D 70 



15 



I I I 

I r 



I I 
I I 
I I 
I i 
I I 
I I 



i| 



I «N I «^ 



•IS o 



— -N — — c^f^^r^ I !M 1 

— — — »n f I I I « 

I I I I— 

— — — I c>» I c^-<0 



I — — — -^rjr^i — f"^?*;; 



■">>>»>.>.>.>.>.>.>.>.>>£ o 



16 



P.D. 70 



Table 5. Cithenship of First AdTnissions 

Males Females Total 

Citizens by birth 18 31 49 

Citizens by naturalization 5 6 11 

Aliens . 5 5 10 

Citizenship unascertained 1 2 3 

Total . 29 44 73 



Table 6. Psychoses of First Admissions 



JrSYCHOSES 


M 


F. 


T. 


r.i. 






1, 1 raumatic psycnoses ........ 










~ 




2. Senile psychoses ......... 














3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis .... 








8 


8 


16 


4. General paralysis ......... 








3 


1 


4 


5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis ...... 










~ 




6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea ..... 














7. Psychoses with brain tumor ....... 














8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total* 










- 




9, Alcoholic psychoses, total ....... 








2 


1 


3 


Delirium tiemens ......... 




i" 










Other types, acute or chronic ...... 


2 












10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, , 














11. Psychoses with pellagra ........ 














12. Psychoses %vith other somatic diseases, total . . 








1 


2 








i 












1 


1 


2 








13. Manic-depressive psychoses, total 








_ 


6 


6 






3 


3 












2 


2 








Other types 




1 


1 








14. Involution melancholia 










4 


4 


IS. Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) . . . 








7 




14 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 








1 


1 


17. Epileptic psychoses 












18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 






1 


5 


6 






2 


2 






Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) . 


1 




2 








Neurasthenic type 




2 


2 








19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality .... 














20. Psychoses with mental deficiency 










1 


1 


21. Undiagnosed psychoses 














22. Without psychosis, total 








2 


4 


6 


Mental-deficiency without psychosis .... 


' "2 


2" 


"4" 












2 


2 








Total 




29 


44 


73 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 



















With 










With 
















cerebral 


General 






other 


Race 


Total 


Senile 


arterio- 


paralysis 


Alcoholic 


somatic 
















sclerosis 










diseases 




M. 


p_ 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 




1 


5 


6 








1 


3 


4 










- 1 ] 




6 


9 


15 


1 




1 


1 




1 






1 


1 2 


1 - 1 




6 


2 


8 


2 




2 


3 




3 














1 




1 


























3 


2 


5 


2 




2 












1 


- 1 






1 


2 


3 






















- 1 1 




1 


1 


2 
























Scandinavian ^ . . . . 




3 


3 
















1 1 










7 


14 


21 




3 


3 


2 


2 


4 


2 


- 2 








Race unascertained 


3 


6 


9 




1 


1 


1 


3 


4 


1 


- 1 








Total 


29 


44 


73 


5 


4 


9 


8 


8 


16 


3 


1 4 


2 


1 3 


1 2 3 



P.D. 70 



17 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 









Involu- 








Paranoia 


Psych 


o- 








Manic- 


tion 


Dementia 


and 




neuroses 


With 


Without 


Race 


depressive 


melan- 


parecox 


paranoid 


and 




mental 


psychosis 








cholia 








conditions 


neuroses 


deficiency 




M. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F.T. 


English 


















- 1 


1 






Finnish. .... 






- 1 1 


2 


4 


6 






- 2 


2 




- 1 1 


French 


- 1 


1 








1 






- 1 


1 


- - - 




German .... 


















1 - 


1 






Irish 






— 1 1 






1 














Italian ' . . . . 








1 




1 










- 1 1 




Lithuanian .... 


- 1 


1 




1 




1 














Scandinavian ^ . . . 


- 1 


1 


- 1 1 




















Mixed 


- 3 


3 


- 1 1 


1 


1 


2 


- 1 


1 


- 1 






2 2 4 


Race unascertained 








1 


1 


2 












- 1 1 


Total .... 


- 6 


6 


4 4 


7 


7 


14 


- 1 


1 


1 5 


6 


- 1 1 


2 4 6 



^Includes "North" and "South." 2>jorwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 


Under 




15-19 






20-24 












15 years 




years 






years 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. Traumatic 






















2. Senile 


5 


4 


9 
















3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


8 


8 


16 
















4. General paralysis 


3 


1 


4 
















5. With cerebral syphilis .... 






















6. With Huntington's chorea 






















7. With brain tumor 






















8. With other brain or nervous diseases 






















9. Alcoholic 


2 


1 


3 












1 




10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 






















11. With pellagra 






















12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 














1 


13. Manic-depressive 




6 


6 






1 


1 




2 


2 


14. Involution melancholia .... 




4 


4 
















15. Dementia praecox 


7 


7 


14 




2 




2 


2 




3 


16. Paranoid and paranoid conditions . 




1 


1 
















17. Epileptic psychoses 






















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


5 


6 












3 


3 


19. With psychopathic personality . 






















20. With mental deficiency .... 




1 


1 






1 


1 








21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 
























.2 


4 


6 


















29 


44 


73 




2 


2 


4 


2 


8 


10 



18 



P.D. 70 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued. 



Psychoses 


25-29 
years 


30-34 
years 


35-39 
years 


40-44 
years 


45-49 
years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 




T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F 


T 


































































3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 
































4. General paralysis . 








1 




1 










I 


2 








5. With cerebral syphilis . 
































6. With Huntington's chorea . 
































7. With brain tumor 
































8. With other brain or nervous 
































diseases .... 
9. Alcoholic 
































10. Due to drugs and other ex- 
































ogenous toxins . 
































11. With pellagra. 
































12. With other somatic diseases . 










1 


1 




















13. Manic-depressive . 
















1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


14. Involution melancholia. 
































IS. Dementia praecox 














1 


2 


3 


2 




2 








16. Paranoia and paranoid con- 
































ditions .... 






















1 


1 








17. Epileptic psychoses 
































18 PsychoncurosGS 3.n.d ncurosGS 


1 




1 
















1 


1 








19. With psychopathic person- 
































ality 
































20. With mental deficiency 
































21. Undiagnosed psychoses 
































22. Without psychosis . 




1 


1 
















3 


3 


1 




1 


Total .... 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


7 


10 


2 




2 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded. 



Psychoses 



50-54 
years 



55-59 
years 



60-65 
years 



65-69 
years 



70 years 
and over 



1. Traumatic 

2. Senile .... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis . 

5. With cerebral syphilis . 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With other brain or nervous 



9. Alcoholic. 

10. Due to drugs and other ex 

ogenous toxins . 

11. With pellagra. . . 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive . 

14. Involution melancholia. 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia and paranoid con 

ditions 

17. Epileptic psychoses 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic person 

ality .... 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses 

22. Without psychosis . 

Total ... 



M. F. T. 



1 1 
1 - 1 



1 

1 1 

2 2 
1 1 



M. F. T. 



M. 



M. 



M. F. T. 



1 - 1 

2 1 3 



4 4 8 
3 6 9 



1 1 
1 1 



1 1 
1 1 



1 1 



1 1 



8 10 18 



D. 70 



19 



a3 -S o 

Willis 

nl cQ c4 c ^ 



= 5 1^5 5''" 



2 .2 



CO * 
0)- 

M ft) 

O C 



It 



' X 2 w'<J•- 
8 « o >.« 



a c _ «s slj-^ 



52 

o oj: 



2 OJ C r"^ cfl O 



20 



P.D. 70 



Table 10. Environment of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 



PSVCHOSES 




Total 




Urban 


Rural 




AI. 


F. 


T. 




F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 1 . 


1. Traumatic 


















2. Senile 


5 


4 


9 


2 


4 


6 


3 


— 3 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


8 


8 


16 


6 


7 


13 


2 


1 3 




3 


1 


4 


3 


1 


4 


~ 


~ " 


5. With cerebral syphilis 




































7. With brain tumor 




































9. Alcoholic 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 






10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins. 


















11. With pellagra 


















12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 












6 


6 




6 


6 






14 Involution melancholia 




4 


4 






4 






15. Dementia praecox 


7 


7 


14 


6 


6 


12 


1 


1 2 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 










1 1 


17. Kpileptic psvchoses ........ 


















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 






19. With psychopathic personality 






















1 


1 










1 1 






















2 


4 


6 


2 


3 


5 




1 1 


Total 


29 


44 


73 


23 


39 


62 


6 


5 11 



Table 11. Economic Condition of First A.dmissions Classified with 
Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 


Dependent 


Marginal 


Comfortable 


Unascer- 




























tained 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. Traumatic 




























2. Senile 


5 


4 


9 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


3 


3 


6 




3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


8 


8 


16 


6 


2 


8 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 


5 




4. General paralysis 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


2 




2 




1 


1 




5. With cerebral syphilis 




























6. With Huntington's chorea 




























7. With brain tumor 




























8. With other brain or nervous dis- 




























eases 




























9. Alcoholic 


2 


1 


3 








2 


1 


3 










10. Due to drugs and other ex- 




























ogenous toxins 




























11. With pellagra .... 




























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 








1 


2 


3 










13. Manic-depressive 




6 


6 




2 


2 




3 


3 




1 


1 




14. Involution m.elancholia . 




4 


4 










2 


2 




2 


2 




15. Dem.entia praecox 






14 


1 


3 


4 


6 


1 


7 




2 


2 


- 1 1 


16. Paranoia and paranoid condition 




i 


1 
















1 


1 




17. Epileptic psychoses . 




























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 


1 


5 


6 




1 


1 


1 


4 


5 










19. With psychopathic personality 




























20. With mental deficiency 




1 


1 




1 


1 
















21. Undiagnosed psychoses . 




























22. Without psychosis 


2 


4 


6 


2 


2 


4 




2 


2 










Total 


29 


44 


73 


11 


12 


23 


14 


17 


31 


4 


14 


18 


- 1 1 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 12 Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified with Reference to 

Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 




Qbstinent 


Temperate 


Intemperate 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. Traumatic 






















2. Senile 


5 


4 


9 


2 


4 


6 


2 — 


2 


1 


— 1 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


8 


8 


16 


1 


8 


9 


2 - 


2 


5 


- 5 


4. General paralysis 


3 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 


2 - 


2 


~ 


~ - 


5. With cerebral syphilis .... 






















6. With Huntington's chorea .... 












































8. With other brain or nervous diseases 






















9. Alcoholic 


2 


1 


3 












2 


1 o 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 






















11. With pellagra 






















12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 


- 


2 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- - 


13. Manic-depressive 


— 


6 


6 




6 


6 










14. Involution melancholia 




4 


4 




4 


4 










15. Dementia praecox 


7 


7 


14 


5 


7 


12 


2 


2 






16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 




1 


1 










17. Epileptic psychoses ..... 






















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 










19. With psychopathic personality . 






















20. With mental deficiency .... 




1 


1 




1 


1 










21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 






















22. Without psychosis 


2 


4 


6 


1 


4 


5 






1 


1 


Total 


29 


44 


73 


11 


43 


54 


9 - 


9 


9 


1 10 



Table 13. Marital Condition of First Admissions Classified with Reference 
to Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 




Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Divorced 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. Traumatic .... 




























2. Senile 


5 


4 


9 




1 


1 


1 




1 


4 


3 


7 




3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


8 


8 


16 


2 




2 


4 


3 


7 


2 


5 


7 




4. General paralysis. 


3 


1 


4 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 










5. With cerebral syphilis 




























6. With Huntington's chorea . 




























7. With brain tumor 




























8. With other brain or nervous 
diseases .... 




























9. Alcoholic .... 


2 


1 


3 


1 




1 




1 


1 








1 - 1 


10. Due to drugs and other ex- 




























ogenous toxins. 




























11. With pellagra 




























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 










2 


2 


1 




1 




13. Manic-depressive. 




6 


6 




3 


3 




3 


3 










14. Involution melancholia 




4 


4 










3 


3 




1 


1 




15. Dementia praecox 


7 


7 


14 


7 


3 


10 




2 


2 




1 


1 


- 1 1 


16. Paranoid and paranoid con- 




























tions 




1 


1 










1 


1 










17. Epileptic psychoses . 




























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




5 


6 




2 


3 




3 


3 










19. With psychopathic person- 
























































20. With mental deficiency 




1 


1 




1 


1 
















21. Undiagnosed psychoses 




























22. Without psychosis 


2 


4 


6 


2 


2 


4 




2 


2 










Total .... 


29 


44 


73 


15 


12 


27 


6 


21 


27 


7 


10 


17 


1 1 2 



22 



P.D. 70 



Table 14. Psychoses of Readmissions 

Psychoses Males Females Total 

1. Traumatic psychoses .... 

2. Senile psychoses 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis . 

6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea . 

7. Psychoses with brain tumor . 



8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases - 1 l 

9. Alcoholic psychoses 1 - 1 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins ... - - - 

11. Psychoses with pellagra - - - 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases 1 - i 

13. Manic-depressive psychoses 3 3 6 

14. Involution melancholia - - - 

15. Dementia praecox 3 2 5 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions - - - 

17. Epileptic psychoses - - - 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses - 1 1 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality - - - 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency - 1 1 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses - - - 

22. Without psychosis - - - 

Total 10 8 18 



1 - 1 

1 - 1 



Table 15. Discharged of Patients Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 
and Condition on Discharge. 



Psychoses 




Total 




Recovered 


Improved 


Unimproved 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1, Traumatic 
























2. Senile 




2 


2 










2 


2 






3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


1 




1 














1 


1 


4. General paralysis 


2 




2 








1 




1 


1 


- 1 


5. With cerebred syphilis .... 


1 




1 














1 


1 


6. With Huntington's chorea .... 
























7, With brain tumor 
























8. With other brain or nervous diseases 


























4 




4 


1 




1 


3 




3 






10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 
























11. With pellagra 
























12. With other somatic diseases 


2 


4 


6 




3 


3 


2 


1 


3 






13. Manic-depressive 


5 


3 


8 


3 




3 


2 


2 


4 




1 1 


14. Involution melancholia .... 




4 


4 










3 


3 




1 1 


15. Dementia praecox 


3 


4 


7 


1 




1 


1 


4 


5 


1 


1 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 










1 


1 






























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


1 


2 






1 










1 1 


19. With psychopathic personality . 
























20. With mental deficiency .... 
























21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 


























1 


1 


2 


















Total 


20 


20 


40 


6 


3 




9 


13 


22 


4 


3 7 



24 



P.D. 70 



Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified uith Reference to Principal 

Psychoses. 



Psychoses 




Total 


30-34 


35-39 


40—44 


45—49 










J ears 


years 


>ears 


J ears 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


1 Trauinatic 
















2 Senile 


3 


6 


9 










3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


14 


6 


20 










4 General para'v^is 
















5 With cerebral ^vphilis 
















6. With Huntington's chorea. 
















7 With brain tumor 
















8. With other brain or nervous diseases 






1 










9 AJcoholic 


4 




4 










10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins. 
















1 1 With pellag"^ 
















12. With other somatic diseases 




1 


1 


- 1 1 








13 \Ianic-d6pressive 




1 


1 










14. Involution melancholia .... 
















15. Dementia praecox 


8 


3 


11 






2-2 


1 - 1 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 


2 




2 










17. Epileptic psychoses 
















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 




1 








1 - 1 


19. With psychopathic personality . 
















20. With mental deficiency .... 


1 




1 











21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 
















22. Without psvchosis 


2 


2 


4 






- 2 2 




Total 


36 


19 


55 


- 1 1 




2 2 4 


2-2 



Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified nith Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded. 





50-5 


4 


55-59 


60-^4 




65-69 




70 


years 


Psychoses 


year 




years 


years 




years 




and over 




M. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. Traumatic 




















2. Senile 










1 




1 


2 


6 8 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


1 1 


2 


1 - 1 


2-2 


4 


1 


5 


6 


4 10 


4. General paralvsis 




















5. With cerebral syphilis .... 




















6. With Huntington's chorea 




















7. With brain tumor 




















8. With other brain or ner\-ous diseases . 
















1 


1 


9. AlcohoHc 






1 - 1 




3 










10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




















11. With pellagra 




















12. With other somatic diseases . 




















13. Manic-depressive 


















1 1 


14. Involution melancholia .... 




















15. Dementia praecox 


1 1 


2 


2-2 


- 1 1 


1 






1 


1 2 


16. Paranoid and paranoid conditions . 








1-1 








1 


- 1 


17. Epileptic psychoses .... 




















18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




















19. With psychopathic personality 




















20. With mental deficiency .... 














- 


1 




21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 














- 






22. Without psychosis 








1-1 


1 




1 






Total 


2 2 


4 


4-4 


4 1 5 


10 


1 


11 


12 


12 24 



P.D. 70 



25 





H 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 






















1 1 1 1 1 


. . . . . 


1 1 1 1 i 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 


1 




IS 


1 1 CN 1 1 


. ■ . . 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


ts 






1 f*5 fS 1 1 








1-2 
years 




1 <*5-H 1 1 

11-11 


1 1 1 - 1 


1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 I 1 • 1 1 
1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 








1 1 1 1 













1 — 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


. . • 1 




00 i 












a 




1 1 1 1 


. . 1 . . 






tt 


H 


1 -H so 1 1 


1 . . . . 


1 




4-7 

lOUtl 


b 


1 1 1 1 


. . . . , 


........ 1 .. . 








1 1 1 


1 . . 1 1 


............ 






H 


1 fN-« 1 1 


< . . . 1 


...I.I...... 




1 fl 




1 -< 1 I 1 


. , , , . 




- 




^' 


1 11 


• 1 1 1 1 


" " ' " 




5-5 


H 


1 1 1 1 


. . < 1 . 


1 — i ..... 1 i 1 




•5 c 




1 1 - 1 ( 


. ■ ■ . . 


1 -i 1 ... 1 1 1 1 . 






^* 


1 1 O 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


.. 1 1 1 1 .... 1 — 






H 


1 ^^o 1 1 


1 1 — 1 


l—CN 


LO 






1 OO 1 1 




1 . 


O 


O 

H 
















1 fOrJ< 1 1 


1 1 — ^ 1 


1 1 1 IXtSl— .-H.fN 


o 



CO 

o o 
!» ?3 o 



2 

rt 2 2 c i XI 

»^ (N 'jJiC O t>-* M o> O — ' fS f*i vd I 



o o ao 

2=11 



o o 

Isi 
|s 1 = 

-n -J 

(J 3 c o 
c o C 
^ > S ^ 



5j >^ 



p o-=T3 ; 



- r- - 2 H 



26 



P.D. 70 



rt C 



ri^ ^3 p-= 
rt c: 2 .S 

o c; cj i-iH ^ o ^ 



u 

— M ^ ti 

d c3 a 

= ^ 



O C 

G 4J U 4^ 



5 c g-^ rt o 



P.D. 70 



27 



Table 19. Family Care Department 



Male Female Total 

Remaining in Family Care, October 1, 1928 18 28 46 

On visit from Family Care, October 1, 1928 

Admitted during the year 8 66 74 

Whole number of cases within the year 26 94 120 

Dismissed within the year: 

Returned to institution 12 44 56 

Discharged (died) 1 - 1 

On visit 1 - 1 

Remaining in Family Care, September 30, 1929 12 50 62 

Supported by State 9 48 57 

Private - - - 

Self-supporting 3 2 5 

Number of different persons within the year 15 60 75 

Number of different persons dismissed 7 55 62 

Number of different persons admitted 14 36 50 

Average daily number in Family Care during the year: 

Supported by State 12.803 39.888 52.691 

Private 

Self-supporting 2.972 3.148 6.120 



Public Document 



No. 70 



SIhp Ql0dtmanmpaltIi of MnssatifmtttB 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Gardner State Colony 

FOR THE 

Year exdixg November 30, 1930 



Department of Mental Diseases 



MafTachufetrs 



Tercentenary 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
50O— 4-'31. Order 3292 



occupational printing plant 
department of mental diseases 

GARDNER STATE COLONY 
GARDNER. MASS. 



GARDNER STATE COLONY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester. 
Richard T. Fisher, Weston, ^^^g^ ofFICIALJ* 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner. 
Miss Grace Nichols, Boston. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg. 
George A. Marshall, Fitchburg. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
LoNNiE O. Farrar, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick F. Moore, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
Har,old K. Marshall, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mary Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. Marr, Steward. 
Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Friberg, Social Worker. 

Mary Anne Chisholm, R.N., Principal of the School of Nursing. 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
Newton Smallwood, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Niex,son, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
Anthony P. Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Elof Teir, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS 
Viola Farnham, G.N., Women's Infirmary. 
Alton "Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, G.N., Women's Hospital Building. 
Martha Wight, G.N., Men's Hospital Building. 
Elvira I. Winchenbach, G.N., Women's Treatment Building. 

l"'^'- RELIGIOUS SERVICES 

Rf.v. James T. Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant 



,,,,, i"" trustees' report 

Xq iils Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

Wc have ths honor to submit herewith the twenty-eighth Annual Report of the 
Hoard of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

Daring the yer^r 1930 the Trustees have lost from amongst their number, by 
rocignation, The mas R. P. Gibb. Mr. Gibb has been a member of the Board 
since 1919. He was interested in the work and his counsel was wise. The growth 
of :ixS business and personal affairs made it increasingly difficulty for him of late 
to give the service to the Colony which every conscientious trustee must give. 
The Trustees regret the necessity for Mr. Gibb's resignation. In his place 
Governor Allen has appointed Professor Pwichard T. Fisher of Petersham. 

The Trustees invite attention to the increasing usefulness of the institution not 
only as it grows in facilities and in the number of patients cared for but for its 
work beyond its own walls. The Out-Patient service of the doctors on our staff 
is increasingly useful. 

Doctor Thompson's report shows that in the Child Guidance Clinic forty-eight 
patients have been studied in the two and a half months since its establishment. 



Lb ^Tij/^^ 

P.D. 70 3 

He calls attention in his report to the necessity of adding to his staflF for extra- 
mural work, if this is to grow. The medical staff of the hospital is only a small 
one and cannot take much of its time away from the care of our in-patients. 
This seems a very worthwhile way for the work of the institution to increase and 
probably the cheapest way for the community to have efficient service along these 
lines of out-patient examination of suspected mental disorder and the guidance of 
children. 

Your Trustees have been impressed with the uniform kindness and sympathetic 
spirit to the patients which pervades the institution. The standard for such a 
spirit and feeling is set by the Superintendent. 

During the year the second of the two buildings for disturbed patients was 
completed and put into operation. We now have one such building for men and 
one for women. This accomplishment has made a tremendous difference in the 
comfort of our patients. It has made it possible to take the more disturbed and 
noisy patients from the infirmary buildings. The patients left in these infirmary 
buildings are under much more satisfactory and restful conditions. The disturbed 
patients are where they can now receive proper treatment and care without dis- 
tressing other patients. 

A hospital building is now being erected. The completion of this building will 
mean another marked increase in the comfort and well-being of the patients. 
Needs of the Hospital: 

The Trustees call attention to the report of their Superintendent showing the 
needs in detail. They would emphasize 

1. A new power house. The matter of a new coal trestle or a re-arrangement 
of coal delivery and storage has been discussed by the engineers of the Common- 
wealth and the officials of the Boston and Maine Railroad for several years. This 
subject is tied up with the obsolescence of our boilers, the inadequacy of our 
smoke stack, and the lack of reserve boiler capacity. It is thp understanding of 
our Board that the engineers of the Commonwealth advocate an entirely new 
boiler house and a re-arrangement of facilities for the delivery and storage of coal. 

2. Construction of a new cow-tie-up and barn for hay. Attention is again 
called to the fire risk under the present arrangement. The close connection of 
dairy, horse stable and cow barn is not an ideal one. 

3. The Superintendent's house. The Trustees repeat what they said in the 
year 1925: 

"The Trustees consider that a Superintendent's house is most important 
for the well-being of the State Colony. The Superintendent and his 
family are entitled to living quarters which will take him away from the 
strain of his daily association with patients and business. The high 
character of our hospitals for the insane can only be maintained by having 
at the head of them, men of capacity, humanity and professional skill. 
Such men can only be procured in the long run when they are given proper 
conditions under which to live and do their work." 

4. Replacing of buildings of two Colonies, now in uncomfortable and in- 
adequate old farm houses. 

5. The construction of a new Colony group for thirty-five patients. Your 
Trustees feel that the Commonwealth made a long step forward when it adopted 
the principle of caring for such insane as were able to work on the land in Colony 
groups. It has been several years since a new group was added at this institution. 
There is now a definite need for clearing a considerable tract of land and farming 
it. This opportunity should receive careful consideration from those interested 
in the efficiency and economy of the care of insane in this Commonwealth. 

The Trustees are in entire sympathy with the other recommendations also, in 
the report of their Superintendent, the reading of which is urgently recommended. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Frederic A. Washburn Grace Nichols 

Thomas H. Shea Amie H. Coes 

Owen A. Hocan Richard T. Fisher 

George A. Marshall 
January 9, 1931 



4 



P.D. 70 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

I respectfully present herewith my annual report of the Gardner State Colony. 
This is for the year ending September 30, 1930 in matters relating to patients 
and for the year ending November 30, 1930 in matters relating to finance. 

Patients 

There were on our books September 30, 1929, 691 men, 543 women, a total of 
1,234 as follows: at the hospital 652 men, 459 women, a total of 1,111; away on 
visit 34 men, 14 women, total 48; on escape 13 men; in family care 12 men, 50 
women, a total of 62. Three in family care are self supporting. 

The daily average number actually under care was 668 men, 477 women, total 
1,146. 

At the close of the year September 30, 1930, the census was as follows: actually 
at the hospital 698 men, 492 women, total 1,190; in family care 9 men, 57 women, 
total 66; at home on visit 16 men, 27 women, total 43; on escape 15 men. The 
total number at the end of the year was 738 men, 576 women, total 1,314. 

There were received during the year 81 women, 116 men, total 197, The 
forms of admission were as follows: voluntary 12; temporary care 14; observa- 
tion 7; regularly committed 65; received by transfer 99. 

The assigned form of mental disease in those admitted for the first time, 78 in 
number, were: senile psychosis, 7 or 8.97%; psychosis with cerebral arterio- 
sclerosis, 13 or 16.67%; general paralysis, 1 or 1.28%; psychosis with other brain 
or nervous diseases, 3 or 3.85%; alcoholic psychosis, 9 or 11.54%; psychosis with 
other somatic diseases, 9 or 11.54%; manic depressive, 5 or 6.41%; involution 
melancholia, 1 or 1.28%; dementia praecox, 9 or 11.54%; paranoia or paranoid 
conditions, 1 or l.'2S%', psychoneurosis and neurosis, 6 or 7.69%; psychosis with 
mental deficiency, 5 or 6.41%; without psychosis, 9 or 11.54%. 

The assigned causes in the first 78 admissions were briefly; poor mental en- 
dowment, 8; worry and poor mental endowment, 14; arteriosclerosis, 12; neu- 
rological, 10; alcohol to excess, 10; sj^philis, 3; physical illness and v/orry, 8; 
senile changes, 7; heredity, 1; unknown, 5. 

Of those admitted for the first time to any hospital 28 or 35.90% were discharged 
within the year. Recovery in some cases is not particularly rapid so that dis- 
charge may not take place in the same year. Over the past five year period 143 
or 35% of those admitted for the first time have been discharged as sufficiently 
improved so that hospital care was no longer necessary. 

There have been 47 deaths. The death rate based on the total number cared 
for was 35%. This death rate may seem high but analysis of the ages at the 
time of death shows that 19 or 40% were 70 years of age or over while 8 or 17 % 
were between 60 and 70 years of age. In those under 60 years of age 20 or 43% 
the chief causes of death in order of frequency were: endocarditis and myo- 
carditis; cerebral hemorrhage and tuberculosis. The chief causes of death in 47 
were: endo myocarditis; cerebral hemorrhage and tuberculosis. 

Out-Patient Service 
At this hospital this includes consultation by appointment, the public clinic, 
examination of backward children in the public schools, child guidance clinic and 
nursery school. 

Thirty-two were seen in consultation: 14 seen at the clinic; 16 seen at home 
or in other hospitals; in 4 cases patients were not seen but their case was brought 
to the attention of our staff either by the family physician, social worker or other 
sources. Twenty of those seen were under 18 years of age. 

At the Child Guidance Clinic 48 have been studied. This clinic, the first of 
several planned, was established in Fitchburg, July 11. It is, therefore, too early 
to state the probable value of this clinic but the fact that 48 children have been 
received for study in the eleven weeks since its establishment indicates that there 
is real need for such a clinic in this and other towns. This need can only be met 
by a suitable extra-mural staff. It is our hope that such an organized staff will 
be provided for in our 1931 appropriation. Naturally, the growing need for 



P.D. 70 



5 



special community work can be carried on only in a very limited way by our 
regular hospital staff. 

Examination of retarded children in the public schools has been continued. 
This year 107 children were examined in 13 different towns and cities as follows: 
Ashby, 2; Athol, 22; Dana, 2; Erving, 7; Greenwich, 2; Gardner, 16; Leverett, 
9; New Salem, 2; Orange, 12; Royalston, 2; Townsend, 14; Wendell, 3; Win- 
chendon, 14. During the ten years since backward children have been examined, 
1,1,68 examinations have been conducted in 27 different towns and cities. 

Through the generosity of an anonymous donor and with the cooperation of 
the Superintendent of Schools of Fitchburg and the Principal of the Fitchburg 
State Normal School a Nursery School has been established in Fitchburg. Space 
has been provided for this in one of the public school buildings. A trained 
instructor and dietitian have been employed. There are ten children whose ages 
are from two to four years at present in the school. Students in training at the 
Fitchburg State Normal School will receive training here and it will also be used 
as a demonstration clinic for parents in connection with the Child Guidance 
Clinic conducted by us. 

Treatment 

Hydrotherapy. Hydrotherapeutic treatment has naturally been an important 
factor in the treatment of newly admitted cases and in those long continued cases 
that show depression or excitation. 

Colonic Irrigation. Colonic irrigation treatment done here as an active treat- 
ment has proved so satisfactory and so encouraging in results that it has now 
become one of our most important forms of hydrotherapeutic treatment. Thus 
far the results are most encouraging, and in the acute cases which are frequently 
found to be dehydrated and who have been given improper care as to diet and 
bowel movement, it is very noticeable that with the giving of colonic irrigation 
the need of other hydrotherapeutic measures is markedly reduced especially the 
need of wet sheet envelopments. The equipment of the colonic irrigation room 
in the building opened this year has certainly justified itself and in the building 
now under construction the colonic irrigation room and equipment for the use of 
men will add materially to our facilities for treatment. 

Personal Hygiene. The Personal Hygiene Department so favorably received 
when installed two years ago has continued its excellent work. It does much to 
increase the feeling of self respect and well being and the result is much personal 
comfort to the individual patient. There were 414 patients treated and 11,429 
treatments given in this department during the year. Troublesome foot con- 
ditions have been attended to and 3il76 treatments have been given. These 
features all help to make this department well worth while. 

Physical Therapy. Physical therapy treatments have been carried on actively 
as in the past and results have been very favorable. There were 798 patients 
treated; 6044 treatments given as follows: infrared, 1,887; Morse wave, 766; 
High frequency, 546; Ultra violet, air cooled, 1148; Ultra violet water cooled, 
693; vibratory, 34; massage, 80; passive motion, 25; dressings and bandaging 
preparatory to and after treatment, 865. 

One of the best forms of treatment of the moderately disturbed or the more 
chronic type has been again this year, as last, occupation at the canning de- 
partment where from twenty to fifty have been occupied daily throughout the 
summer and fall months and has resulted in the canning of over 18,000 gallons 
of fruit and farm vegetables. 

Occupational Therapy 
As in former years each patient coming before the staff is carefully considered, 
not only from the psychiatric point of view as to diagnosis, but the treatment is 
outlined in every case and prescribed by a physician who continues supervision 
of patients. 

Not all patients are benefitted most by simpler and diversional occupation but 
may be interested more in some constructive work. Each case is studied and the 
proper occupational therapy prescribed. 



6 



P.D. 70 



Industrial Therapy 

This Colony being founded with the primary idea of developing industry for 
the benefit of the patients and the colony as a whole, there are many articles 
made and it seems unwarranted to print a list, but such a list is available to those 
who may wish it. In general the industrial departments are: 

Furniture Department. Here is made all furniture of the ordinary type used by 
the colony. There were made this year 441 pieces of furniture and 3,795 pieces 
have been repaired. 

Shoe Department. Here all shoes are made and repaired. There were 851 pair , 
of shoes and slippers made; 227 articles other than shoes have been made and 
2,688 pair of shoes and slippers repaired. There were also 6,934 miscellaneous 
articles repaired in this department. 

Tailoring Department. All articles of apparel worn have been made. For men 
and women 988 garments have been made and 3,659 repaired. The cutting of 
all garments is also done in this department but they are largely made by the 
women in the women's departments. 

Textile Department. Here is made denim, gingham, khaki, linings, blankets, 
bedspreads, sheeting, shirting, toweling and underwear material. 20,562 yards of 
materials have been woven during the year. In this department also all brooms, 
brushes, mattresses and stockings are made. 

Women's Industrial Department. All clothing is made here and 25,717 articles 
of clothing were made during the year. There were also 20,424 articles other 
than clothing, such as household materials, novelties, etc. There were 45,163 
articles mended. 

There is a close association with the occupational therapy department and this 
industrial department. 

Printery. This department is under the supervision of the Department of 
Mental Diseases and does the printing for the sixteen hospitals under its super- 
vision. The work of this department has increased to a point where a new 
building is now necessary and is under construction. 

Canning. All fresh fruits and vegetables are canned and over 1^,000 gallons 
were canned at the cannery this year and 5,085 gallons of fruits, vegetables and 
pickles together with 490 glasses of jelly were put up in glass at the various 
cottage kitchens. Beside the canned goods 11,000 pounds of soap was manufac- 
tured. 

Dental 

There have been under observation and treatment 3,209 patients; 2,206 re- 
ceived prophylatic treatment; 314 fillings of various types were done; 873 
extractions under local and general anasthesia; minor surgical operations were 
required in 81 cases; 191 needed special treatment for various diseases of the mouth. 
In addition, was the usual plate work, post operative treatments, x-ray, etc. 

General Medjcal 

There have been no changes in the medical staff during the year. 

The general health of both patients and employees has been good with the 
usual illnesses occurring as in ordinary communities; one case of scarlet fever | 
occurred and was removed to the Isolation Hospital with no other cases following. 
There have been no outbreaks of serious contagious diseases. 

Miss Ethel A. Gleason held the position of Social Worker from April 28, 1930 
to November 16, 1930. Mrs. Elizabeth J. Friberg was appointed to fill this 
vacancy on November 17, 1930. 

A psychometrist and male hydrotherapist have been added and a physical 
instructor, male, was employed during the summer months. 

Various members of the Staff have addressed meetings in the community upon 
request and there have been a number of such requests. 

A series of meetings on "Better Mental Health" have been conducted by us 
but sponsored and financed by the Gardner Rotary Club and proved very worth 
while. Lectures were given with the assistance of the Massachusetts Society for 
Mental Hygiene and the Massachusetts Department of Education. The average 
attendance at all meetings was over 800 which means a very general awakening 



P.D. 70 



7 



to the need of a better understanding of self and a better community mental 
health. 

Twenty-five persons whose work and interest in the community requires an 
understanding of the mental hygiene movement met here June 24. 

Seventy persons attended the Central District Advisory Committee of the 
Massachusetts Mental Hygiene Society which met here May 22. 

Forty-eight members of the class of the Lowell State Normal School met here 
November 7. A special meeting was arranged for them and a visit through the 
hospital. 

On October 1, 1930 a training school for psychiatric nurses was established and 
Miss Mary A. Chisholm, R. N., was appoint^ principal of the school. AH 
attendant nurses between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five are required to 
take this training. 

Diversion 

Motion pictures shown weekly during the winter months and dances have 
been enjoyed. Baseball games several times each week during the summer 
months provided outdoor diversion for a large number of patients. Out-of-door 
all day programs for July 4 and field day held September 17, were carried out as 
usual with all suitable patients attending. Picnics, walks, sleigh rides, etc., were 
especially enjoyed by the women patients. 

Relating to Finance 

There was expended for maintenance during the year $442,6,91.63 which in- 
cluded $11,005.06 for unusual repairs and renewals which is equal to a gross per 
capita cost of $7.03 per week. The gross per capita cost for the previous year 
was $7.02. The income for the year from all sources was $46,131.08 which is 
equal to a net income weekly per capita of $.73. The net per capita cost for the 
present year is $6.30 compared with the previous year of $6.29. 

Special Appropriations 

For the construction of a building for printing an appropriation of $10,000 was 
made available. This building has only at the end of the year been planned and 
construction begun. It should be completed by March 1. 

There was appropriated $150,000 for a hospital building to accommodate 85 
patients. This building was begun under contract on May 26. It should be 
ready for occupancy March 1. 

Ft>r an employees' cottage to house 12 employees there was appropriated 
$12,000. Its construction has been carried on under our own supervision and 
it will be opened shortly after January first. 

There was appropriated $10,000 for two cottages for officers and these have 
been constructed under our own supervision and are nearly ready for occupancy. 

For installation of a fire alarm system there was appropriated $5,000. Instal- 
lation has been largely completed so far as this part of the system was planned. 
Extension will follow. 

There was appropriated $10,000 for the construction of a cow barn. The plans 
for this are under way and construction should start in the early spring. 

A building for semi-disturbed men for which an appropriation was made in 
1929 was completed and opened July 7 for eighty-six patients. 

Repairs Not Recurring Annually 

Under repairs and renewals a part of the maintenance appropriation, $11,000 
was appropriated for the following: 

1. Flour mixing equipment. A two barrel Day flour mixer has been installed 
in the bakery. 

2. Renewing pipe from pond. Pipe has been purchased and received and is 
awaiting a suitable time to be laid. 

3. Warren Duplex Boiler Pump. This has been purchased and installed. 

4. Recording apparatus in boiler room. Two CO2 recorders have been installed . 

5. Union Compound Meter. This has been installed. 

6. Lightning protection. Lightning arrestors have been installed at the dairy 
group. All buildings there are now protected. 

7. Laundry equipment. An automatic press has been installed. A compressed 
air outfit for the laundry has been purchased and is awaiting installation. 



8 



P.D. 70 



8. Repairs to coal trestle. Ordinary repairs have been made but the extra- 
ordinary renewals required by the railroad company have not been made owing 
to the fact that study is being made of the re-location of the trestle. 

9. Filter bed construction. Belcher to Hillcrest Cottages and filter bed con- 
struction at the Westminster Cottages. Money is available only for the purchase 
of material, and construction of filter beds must necessarily await a further 
appropriation. 

10. Dairy equipment. A new and larger pasteurizer, a new milk cooler, 
together with the necessary pumps, can sterilizers, etc., have been purchased and 
installed. 

11. Changing telephone cable. This money will not be expended as the 
Telephone Company is to install the cable without charge. 

12. Vent and exhaust fan. This has been installed in the kitchen connected 
with the hood over the ranges and is operating in a very satisfactory manner. 

General Annual Repairs 

All buildings have required the usual number of repairs during the year and 
repair work in general has been kept up properly. Many buildings have been 
painted inside and out. Plumbing and heating of buildings have required the 
usual amount of repair but are in good condition. 

One of the most important repairs made during this and previous years has 
been the replacing of wood shingles on certain of our cottages with asbestos 
shingles. In the past three years fifteen buildings have been re-shingled with 
asbestos, ten of these being occupied by patients. At the present time there are 
only three buildings occupied by patients that should be reshingled, this coming 
where the danger of roof fires exists. 

The approach from the office to the station has been re-built and much 
improved by the building of a cement sidewalk and planting of shrubbery. 

Steel equipment has replaced wood in the Canteen. 

The vacuum system of heating has been extended to include the Administration 
Building. 

A cement bridge has been constructed over the brook at the Westminster 
Cottage Farm replacing an old wood structure which was difficult to keep in 
repair. 

Improvements have been made in the Wachusett Cottage and the Valley House 
where old piazzas and sheds have been removed and repairs made. 

Extension to the subway has been built between the Ash Cottage and the 
Locust Cottage constructed this year. 

Farm, Garden, Dairy and Live Stock 

All agricultural activities have been very successful this year. In many parts 
of the New England States the continued dry weather was not conducive to good 
crops but here it was our good fortune to have just a sufficient amount of rain 
at the right time to give us a larger farm crop than ever before. 

A. General farm operations. There were 161 acres under cultivation and 115 
acres in hay crop. Of the 161 acres, 71 were in garden, 37 ensilage, 24 potatoes, 
27 green feed, 2 turnips. 

The total cost of all farm operations, including payroll and expenses, was 
$49,553.03. The book value of all farm returns, including farm credits was 
$86,104.66. The value of farm to institution was $77,000. The actual cash 
profit of farm operations based on food raised for the insitution was $28,370.51. 

The largest crop of any was 7,934 bushels of potatoes valued at $8,374.53. 
This was a return of 350 bushels per acre. The garden crop was 693,032 lbs. 
valued at $18,070.43. 

B. Dairy We have milked an, average of 57 cows during the year which have 
produced an average of 12,943 lbs. of milk with a butter fat of 3.8%. The total 
mijk production for the year was 718,614 pound^ valued at $33,415.56. The 
total cost of operating the dairy was $23,283.84 with a profit at the assigned milk 
price of $.0465 per pournd, wa^ $10,131.72. In addition to milk there has been a 
return of $3,273.36 from beef, hides, veal, etc. The herd has again been free 
from tuberculosis having passed the Federal and State tests for four years. The 
removal and slaughter of aborting cows presented a troublesome problem two 



P.D. 70 



9 



years ago. It was reduced last year to two cases and this year to one. This may 
or may not have been a true case of abortion. Last year mammitis among the 
cows was prevalent. Immediate removal and slaughter was practised. This year 
there have been no serious cases of mammitis. An outbreak of hemorrhagic 
septicaemia occurred in the young stock in pasture although they were supposedly 
immunized a month previous to going to pasture. Eight heifers died and forty- 
four were re-immunized which controlled the outbreak. 

Toward the close of the year we purchased four pure bred heifers, dams of 
each of which have produced 23,000 pounds of milk per year or better. We also 
purchased a registered bull seven months of age whose dam three times held the 
world record for yearly milk production in class B. 

C. Swine. We began the year with 259 pigs of all ages with an inventory 
value of $5,086. At the close of the year we have 282 pigs of all ages with an 
inventory value of $4,703.50 causing a reduction in inventory vajue of $382.50. 
During the year 205 hogs were killed for pork amounting to 45,167 pounds. The 
total cost of operating the piggery was $6,849.61. The returns from pork produced 
and by-products was $7,405.05. There was a profit of $555.54, with a loss in 
inventory of $382.50. The final net profit for the year was $173.04 We have 
been free from hemorrhagic septicaemia and hog cholera this year, consequently 
the mortality of small pigs was low compared with previous years The greatest 
loss has been from large litters with weak pigs In the closing month of 1929 
we purchased four pure bred duroc sows and two registered duroc boars from 
which better type pigs are to be expected in the future 

D. Poultry. At the beginning of the year we had 783 hens and at the end of 
the year 865. This year as in previous years 2,000 day-old chicks were purchased 
in the early spring. There were 9,145 dozen eggs produced and 5,466^ pounds 
of fowl, broilers, and chickens for table use. In addition 156 pounds of geese, and 
90 pounds of duck. The total gain for the year including inventory was $3,158.58 . 

E. Orchards. Seventy-five apple trees were set out continuing the planting 
program begun in 1925. We harvested 125 barrels of apples and made 58 barrels 
of cider for vinegar. 

F. Miscellaneous activities. Last winter there were cut and sawed 60,600 feet 
of lumber and 445 cords of fire wood, 2,400 tons of ice harvested, 2,000 tons of 
rock removed from fields, crushed and used in road building construction. 
Continuing reforestation, we set out 7,500 white pine and 7,500 spruce seedlings. 
There were 1,450 cubic yards of new road constructed and 9,640 square yards of 
old road repaired. 

Recommendations for Current Expenses for 1931 



Personal services $260,460.00 

Religious instruction 1,900.00 

Travel, transportation and office expenses . . . 5,500.00 

Food 71,500.00 

Clothing and materials 19,000.00 

Medical and general care 25,500.00 

Heat, light and power 37,200 . 00 

Farm 36,000.00 

Garage, stable and grounds 6,347 . 73 

Repairs ordinary 16,000.00 

Repairs and renewals 11,000.00 



Total $512,307.73 



The $11,000 requested for repairs and renewals not recurring annually in detail 
is as follows: 

Re-building one half mile of road, $1,400. The main road and approach to 
the office in the receiving group is now a gravel road and is unsatisfactory and 
difficult to maintain. It is planned to build an asphalt road. 

Mesh grills, $1,370.00. These are to encircle the fire escapes on the Men's 
and Women's Infirmaries. . There is danger now of patients jumping over the rail. 



10 



P.D. 70 



Roofing-gray asbestos, $1,500.00. This is to continue the replacing of wood 
shingles by asbestos shingles. 

Drying tumbler, $3,555.00. This is to replace a drying tumbler which has 
come to the need of repairs that would cost nearly as much as a new tumbler 
dryer. 

Extension of fire alarm system, $1,500.00. This is for the addition of signal 
boxes at various buildings to extend the system installed in 1930. 

Machine shop repairs. $440.00. The purchase of an oxy-acetyline welding 
and cutting outfit and the purchase of an electric hammer. 

Changes-Belcher Cottage Barn. $'/ 00.00. It is planned to move horses from 
the dairy barns and to rebuild the part occupied by horses for cows. 

Repairs to coal trestle and sidetrack $535.00. This estimate is based upon a 
list of repairs now required by the Boston and Maine Railroad. 

Special Appropriations Requested 

Re-location of Power House. Considering both the needs at the power house 
and the question of delivery of coal, it is assumed that there will be a re-location 
of the power house with a new building, new equipment, chimney and coal 
storage. We now have two boilers dated 1903, two dated 1905 and with the 
addition of new buildings all four boilers will be in operation the coming winter 
leaving no spare boiler. Serious trouble may result if anything should happen to 
any one boiler; but even if this were done, it does not care for the delivery of 
coal which subject has been discussed for the past several years. 

Employees' Cottage. This cottage will be similar to if not identical with the 
cottages now occupied. Appropriation requested is $14,000. Of this $12,000 is to 
be used for building including subway connections and $2,000 for furnishings. 

Alterations of Monadnock and Watatic Cottages. These cottages are now oc- 
cupied by parole men but so close to the present treatment building for women 
that this is not desirable. It is proposed to make interior alterations of these 
buildings to house special employees. The work would be done by our own labor. 

Sewage disposal. Provides for filter beds to care for the Westminster Cottages 
and filter beds for a group of cottages of which the Highland Cottage is approxi- 
mately the central cottage. An appropriation of $1,900 was granted under renewals 
for 1930 for the construction of filter beds at the Westminster Cottages and 
$1,000 appropriated for beginning work cn filter beds at the Highland Cottage 
group. Neither of these amounts is sufficient to do more than purchase certain 
material this year. The estimates show that an appropriation of $2,000 should 
be made for the Westminster Cottage Group development and $9,251 for the 
Belcher to Kill crest Group development. 

Purchase of seventeen acres of land. Along the highway on the road from the 
office to Gardner and adjacent to our land is a tract of seventeen acres which I 
believe should be purchased. Not that we need more land, but for the protection of 
the colony for the future. I believe that the colony should be protected from 
encroachment so that we may enjoy the many advantages coincident with 
complete isolation from the city. 

Reception Building for fifty patients. This building would provide for the 
reception of patients coming direct from their homes. At the present time they 
are of necessity admitted to buildings housing many patients and find them- 
selves in an environment which is altogether strange, rather alarming and not 
conducive to peace of mind and prospect of early recovery. The general effect 
upon relatives and the attitude of the public at large would be very much im- 
proved by receiving patients in a building of this type. Such a building would 
also be a center for out patient activities which are constantly increasing. It 
would give a most suitable opportunity for consideration of and short periods of 
treatment to that class of patients who are becoming more and more willing to 
seek hospital care early but who cannot be expected to enter crowded buildings 
where they find themselves mixed at once with all kinds of mental cases. 

Hay storage. The need is evident at present for a plan of development which 
will provide for additional tie-ups for cows, a hay barn, milking unit, a horse 
barn, manure pit, a hospital unit for cows, provision for tools, implements, etc. 



P.D. 70 



11 



The immediate need for 1931 would seem to be a barn for additional hay and 
grain storage. 

Colony group for thirty-five patients. It is suggested that a colony be constructed 
to care for thirty-five patients and five employees. It has been a number of years 
since a colony group has been added. At this time there is urgent need of a 
colony near a large tract of land that can be fairly readily cleared up and turned 
into excellent farm land. Such a colony would care for the type of patients able 
to clear land and till it at a lesser cost than in our more expensive buildings. 

Superintendent's house. This has been recommended annually since the begin- 
ning of the colony and is thought highly desirable. 

Conclusion 

Many friends of the Colony have donated books, magazines, and special 
articles for the Occupational Therapy Department during the year. I would be 
remiss if I did not take this opportunity to express in behalf of the patients our 
thanks. 

I would also express my appreciation for the faithful and loyal support given 
me by the officers and employees of the Colony which has been most marked and 
fully appreciated. 

I am indebted to each and every member of the Board of Trustees for their 
unfailing support, cooperation and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances f this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1930. i 

Cash Account 
Receipts 

Income 

Board of patients $40.287.11 

$40,287.11 

Personal services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retireme it 167.49 

Sales : 

Travel, transportation and office expenses . $ 48 . 03 

Food, Board of Employees 2,557.19 

Clothing and materials 292.57 

Furnishings and household supplies 13.80 

Medical and general care 3 . 07 

Farm: ^ 

Hares 3.00 

Hides 59.33 

Garage, stable and grounds 8. 10 

Repairs, ordinarj' 143.90 

Arts and Crafts Sales ...» 1.080.70 

Total sales $4,209.69 

Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances $751.97 

Rent 714.82 

1,466.79 

Total income $46,131.08 

Maintenance 

Balance from previous year, brought forward ^ff't^"^ 

Appropriations, current year 465.600.00 

Total $474,486.27 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 442.691.63 

Balance i-everting to Treasur>' of Commonwealth $31,794.64 

Anili'srs oj Ejpenses 

Personal ser\'ices ^^^t'oon'cn 

Religious instruction 1 ijV oV 

Travel, transportation and office expenses A-^^i • ?^ 

Food . fl'omm 

Clothing and materials ,0-71 no 

Furnishings and household supplies \^'L?l o^ 

Medical and general care ,o^nn oV 

Heat, light and power 38.699.84 



12 P.D. 70 

Fann 34.679.58 

Garage, stable and grounds 5,557 .60 

Repairs, ordinary 16,989 .57 

Repairs and renewals 11,005 .06 

Total expenses for maintenance $442,691.63 

Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1. 1929 $119,583.28 

Appropriations for current year 197,000.00 

Total $316,583.28 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $205,94.4.70 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 10,586.18 

216,530.88 

Balance November 30, 1930, carried to next year $100,052.40 





Act 






Expended 


Total 




Balance 


Object 


or 


Whole 


During 


Expended 


at End 




Resolve 


Amount 


Fiscal Year 


to Date 


of Year 


♦Additional Filter Beds . 


138-1927 


S15,000 


00 




$14,985 


48 


$14.52 




127-1928 














♦Officers' Cottages .... 


127-1928 


10,000 


00 




9,994 


35 


5.65 


♦Coal Trestle and Side Track 


127-1928 


10,700 


00 




173 


99 


10,526.01 


♦Rep. Road, Westminster 


127-1928 


1,000 


00 




968 


10 


31.90 


♦Dairy Building Purposes 


146-1929 


3,000 


00 




2,991 


90 


8. 10 


Additional Water Supply 


126-1924 


42,000 


00 




36,911 


86 


5,088.14 




398-1926 














Building for Semi-Dist. Men . 


146-1929 


150,000 


00 


$103,657.22 


149,748 


26 


251.74 


Building for Printing 


115-1930 


10,000 


00 


613.20 


613 


20 


9,386.80 


Employees' Cottage 


115-1930 


12.000 


00 


9,990.02 


9,990 


02 


2,009.98 


Two Cottages for Officers 


115-1930 


10,000 


00 


8,496.47 


8,496 


47 


1,503.53 


Hospital Building .... 


115-1930 


150,000 


00 


81,572.00 


81,572 


00 


68,428.00 


Fire Alarm System .... 


115-1930 


5.000 


00 


1,615.79 


1,615 


79 


3.384.21 


Cow Bam 


115-1930 


10,000 


00 








10,000.00 






$428,700 


00 


$205,944.70 


$318,061 


42 


$110,638.58 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with ♦) . $10,586. 18 



Balance carried to next year $100,052.40 

Total as above 100,052 40 

Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 1,209.945 

Total cost of maintenance, $442,691.63 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $7.0361 

Receipt from sales, $4,209.69 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $.0669 

Wl other insitution receipts. $41,921 39 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $ 6664 

Net weekly per capita $6.3028 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gertrude W. Perry, 

Treasurer. 



VALUATION 

November 30, 1930 
Real Estate 

Land, 1.856 acres . $41,125.00 

Buildings 1,283,927.86 



Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Medical and general care . 
Heat, light and power 

Farm 

Garage, stables and grounds . 
Repairs 



Personal Property 



Real estate . 
Personal property 



Summary 



$1,325,052.86 

$300.00 
28,544.88 
16.915.79 
201,788.42 
5.055.85 
11.834.58 
59.361.67 
12,531.34 
15,880.50 

$352,213.03 



$1,325,052.86 
352,213.03 



$1,677,265.89 



P.D. 70 



13 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 



Table 1. General Information 

Data correct at end of hospital year, November 30, 1930 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases: October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant — \'alue of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings !. . . $1,325,052.86 

Personal property "... 352,213.03 



Total . ' 

Total acreage of hospital property owaed. 1,856. 

Total acreage under cultivation durirg previous j-ear, 322.25. 



4. Officers and Employees: 



Superintendents 
Assistant physicians 
Clinical as^jistants . 

Total physicians 
Stewards ..• 
Resident dentists . 
Pharmacists 
Graduate nurees 
Other nurses and attendants 
Occupational Therapists 
Social workers 

All other officers and employees 



Actually in Service at 
End of Year 



Total officers and employees 120 



M. 


t. 


t. 


1 




1 


4 




5 


5 


1 


6 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 








7 


7 


60 


59 


119 




5 


5 




1 


1 


52 


39 


91 


120 


112 


232 



$1,677,265.89 



Vacancies at End 
of Year 
F. 



10 



Note; — The following items, 5-10 inclusive, are for the year ended September 30, 1930. 
5. Census of patient population at end of year: 



White 
Insane . . 
Epileptiqs 
Mental defectives 
All other cases 

Total 
Other race^: 
Insane . i 
Mental defectives 



Total 
Grand Tot^l 



M. 

640 



36 

3 

679 



10 
698 



Actually in Hospital 



F. 

459 



482 
10 



10 
492 



T. 

1,099 



1.161 



29 
1,190 



Absent from Hospital 
! but Still on Books 



M. 

34 



40 



6. Patients undei^ treatment in occupational-therapy classes, including phy- 

sical trainirig. on date of report 24' 

7. Other patients! employed in general work of hospital on date of report 541 , 

8. Average daily jnumber of all patients actually in hospital during year 674. IC 

9. Voluntary patients admitted during year 6 ■ 

10. Persons given ^dvice or treatment in out-patient clinics during year 148 j 



T. 



76 


110 




1 


7 


11 




2 


84 


124 


84 


124 


Females 


Total 


123 


147 


365 


906 


472.646 


1.146.732 


6 


12 


82 


230 



Table 2. Financial Statement 
S^e treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



14 



P.D. 70 



^ S 



r^ir, ^ «s I 1 >-< 



5r 



Pi 



I/; ^ 0\ vO a* ^ ^ 



r^j M OO^O 



t- o 




P.D. 70 1.3 

Table 4. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 



Nativity 


Patiekts 


Parents ok Male 
Patientts 


P.\KENTS OF Female 
Patients 


M. F. T. 


Both 

Fathers Mothers Parents 


Both 

Fathers Mothers Parents 


United States 
Canada! .... 
England .... 
Finland .... 
Germany .... 
Ireland ..... 

Poland 

Scotla.id .... 
Other countr.-es . 
Unascertained 

Total .... 


14 18 32 
1 3 4 
1 - 1 
3 6 9 

13 4 
1 - 1 

1 1 


8 8 • 7 

1 2 1 
1 1 1 

3 3 3 
1 

5 S 5 

i 1 1 
1 1 1 


11 10 9 
T 6 6 
1 2 1 
6 6 6 

3 4 3 

1 

1 1 1 

1 2 1 


21 31 52 


21 21 19 


31 31 27 



Includes Newfoundland 



16 



P.D. 70 



CO 



-2 ?i 



I ^ I ^ I CO 



to 



" >.>.>,>.>,>.>.>.>.>>>>>- 

! I I I I I I I I I I I 



P.D. 70 



17 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions 

Citizens by birth 

Citizens by naturalization i . 

Aliens I ■ • 

Citizenship unascertained i . 

Total . . . ;. 

I 

Table 6. Psychoses of First Admissions 



Males 


Females 


Total 




18 


32 




3 


5 




7 


11 


:. . 1 


3 


4 




31 


52 



PSYCHOSES 


M 


F 


T 


M 


F 


; T 


1. 


Traumatic psychoses 










_ 




2. 


Senile psychoses 








4 


4 


8 


3. 


Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis .... 








6 


7 


13 


4. 


General paralysis 








1 




1 


5. 


Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 










_ 




6. 


Psychoses with Huntington's chorea ..... 








_ 


^ ■ 




7. 


Psychoses with brain tumor 










_ 




8. 


Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total* 


...... 




..... 


1 


1 


2 








. . 














1 


1 








9 


Alcoholic psychoses, totcil ....... 


...... 






1 


_ 






Acute hallucinosis 




1 


i 








10. 


Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 








_ 


_ 


_ 


11. 


Psychoses with pelagra . 








- 


- 


- 


12. 


Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 








1 


3 


4 








1 


1 














1 


1 












1 


1 


2 








13. 


Manic-depressive psychoses, to^al 










3 


3 








3 


3 








14. 


Involution melancholia 










2 


2 


15. 


Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) . . . . . 








5 


3 


8 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 










1 


. A 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 














18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 












1 




Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) 














19. 


Psychoses with psychopathic personality .... 








1 




1 


20. 


Psychoses with mental deficiency 










5 


5 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 










1 


1 


22. 


Without psychosis, total 


...... 




..... 


1 




1 




Psychopathic personality without psychosis . 
















Total . . . . 




21 


31 


52 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 





















With 






With other 


















cerebral 


General 


brain or 




Race 1 


Total 




Senile 


arterio 




paralysis 


nervous 




















sclerosis 


diseases 








M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


English 






4 


4 


8 








3 




4 


1 - 1 




Finnish 






3 


6 


9 








1 




1 




1 1 


French 






1 


4 


5 




1 


2 




1 


1 






German 








1 


2 


















Irish 






6 


3 


9 


2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


3 




1 - 1 


Slavonic 1 . 










2 


















Spanish 




























Mixed 


; : : 




4 


10 


14 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 






Race unascertained . 






2 


3 










2 


2 






Total . 






21 


31 


52 


4 


4 


8 


6 


7 


13 


1 - 1 


1 1 2 



18 



P.D. 70 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Princij:al 
. Psychoses — Continued 











With 


















Race 


Alcoholic 


other 




Manic 




Involution 


Dementia 










somatic 




depressive 


melancholia 


praecox 










diseases 




















M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


C/nglisn 








1 


1 






— 1 


1 




1 1 


Finnish . 




1 • - 


1 






1 


1 








2 2 


French 










1 


1 








































Irish 






















2 


- 2 


Slavonic 1 
















1 


1 


1 


- 1 


Spanisfi . 


























Mixed 










1 


1 


- 2 


2 






2 


- 2 


Raice unasoer 


,ained 








1 


1 














Total 






1 


1 


1 3 


4 


- 3 


3 


- 2 


2 


5 


3 8 



Table 7. Race of First Adpiissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psyfihoses — Concluded 



Race : 


Paranolia 

and ! 
paranoid 
conditions 


Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses 


With 

psycho 
pathic 
personality 


With 
mental 
deficiency 


Un- 
diagnosed 
psychoses 


Without 
psychosis 




M F 


T 


M F T 


M F T 


M F T 


M F T 


M F T 


French . . . 

Irish . . . 

Spanish . . : . 

Mixed . . 

Race unascertained ' . 


- 1 


1 


- 1 1 


1 - 1 


- 2 2 

- 1 1 

- 1 1 

- 1 1 


-1 1 


1 - 1 


Total 


- 1 


1 


- 1 1 


1 - 1 


- 5 5 


- 1 1 


1 - 1 



1 Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Delmatian, Herzegovintan, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, 
Russian, Ruthenian. Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 



Psychoses. 











Under 




15-19 






20-24 


Psychoses 




Total 




15 years 




years 






years 




M 


F 


T 


M 


F T 


M 


F 


T 


M 


F T 


1. Traumatic . . .. . 






















2. Senile 


4 


4 


8 
















3 With cerebral arteiosdrlerosis 


6 


7 


13 
















4. General paralysis 


1 




1 
















5 With cerebral syphilisj .... 






















6. With Huntington's chorea .... 






















7 With brain tumor 






















8. With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 


1 


2 
















9. Alcoholic 


1 




1 
















10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 






















11. With pellagra 






















12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


3 


4 




















3 


3 








1 


1 






14. Involution melancholia .... 




2 


2 
















15 Dementia praecox 


5 


3 


8 






1 




1 


1 


1 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 
















17. Epileptic psychoses 






















18. Psychoneuroses aiid neuroses 




1 


1 
















19. With psychopathic personality . 


1 




1 
















20. With mental deficiency .... 




5 


5 




1 1 












21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 




1 


1 


















1 




1 
















Total 


21 


31 


52 




1 1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 



( 



P.D. 70 



19 



Table 8. Aae of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 









25-29 






30-34 






35-39 




40-44 






45-49 




Psychoses 




years 






years 






years 




years 






years 








M 


F. 


T. 


M 


F 


T 


M 


F 


T 


M F 


T 




M 


F 


T 


































































3. Witn cerebral arteriosclerosis 






























4. General paralysis 




■ 


- 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6. With cerebral syphilis . 






























6. With Huntington 


s chorea . 






























7. Witii brain tumo 
































8 . With other brai.i 


or nervous 






























diseases 




























1 


1 




























1 


- 


1 


10. Due to drugs and other ex- 




























ogenous toxica 
















~ 




— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


11. With pellagra 
































\~. \\ ith other somatic diseases 




1 


1 
























13. Manic-depressive 


















1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1-i. Involution melancholia 






























15. Denie.itia praecox 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 




~ 




1 


1 


16. I aranoia and paranoid con- 






























ditions 
































17. Epileptic psychoses 






























18. Psychoneuroses iind neuroses 


























1 


1 


19. With psychopathic person- 














































1 




1 












20. With mental deficiency 
















2 


2 


2 


2 








21. Undiagnosed psychoses 




















1 


1 








22. Without psychosis 














1 




1 












Total 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


4 


8 


4 


4 


1 


3 


4 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to , Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 



Psychoses 



50-54 
years 



55-59 
years 



00-64 
years 



65-69 
years 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T 



M F T 



1. Traumatic . . 

2. Senile .... 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis . 

5. Witn cerebral syphilis . 

6. With rluntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor . 

8. With other brain or nervous 

diseases • : ■ 

9. Alcoholic . . 

10. Due to drugs and other ex 

ogenous toxins . 

11. With pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive . 

14. Involution melancholia 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia and paranoid con 

ditions . . 

17. Epileptic psychoses 

18. Psychoneuroses and neurose 

19. With psychopathic person 

ality 

20. With mental deficiency 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses 

22. Without psychosis 

Total . . . 



1 - 1 



1 - 1 

-22 



1 - 1 

1:1 



I 1 



20 



P.D. 70 




P.D. 70 



21 



Table 10. Environment of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Tota 




Urban 


Rural 


. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 






















2. Senile 


4 


4 


8 


4 


4 


8 


- 


- 


— 




6 


7 


13 


4 


5 


9 


2 


2 


4 


4. General paralysis 


1 


- 


1 


~ 




~ 


1 


~ 


1 










































7. With brain tumor 




















8. With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








9. Alcohoiie 


1 


— 


1 


1 










I 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 








































12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


3 


4 




I 




J 


2 


3 


13. Manic-depressive 




3 


3 




2 






1 


1 


14. Involution melancholia 




2 


2 




1 






1 


1 


15. Dementia praecox 


5 


3 


8 


5 


3 










16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 




1 






























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 






1 




1 












1 




1 








1 




1 


20. With mental deficiency 




5 


5 




5 


5 








21. Undiagnosed psychoses 




1 


1 










1 


1 




1 




1 


1 




1 








Total 


21 


31 


52 


16 


24 


40 


5 


7 


12 



Table 11. Economic Condition of First Admissions Classified with 
Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 


Total 


Dependent 


^Marginal 


Comfortable 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 




























4 


4 


8 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


4 




2 2 


3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


6 


7 


13 


2 


2 


4 


2 


1 


3 


2 


4 6 




1 




1 








1 




1 






5. With cerebral syphilis .... 
























6. With Huntington's chorea .... 
















































8. With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 


1 


2 










1 


1 


1 


1 


9. Alcoholic 


1 




1 














1 


1 


10. Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 
























11 With pellagra 
























12. With other somatic diseases 


1 


3 


4 


1 




1 




3 


3 










3 


3 










3 


3 






14. Involution melancholia .... 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 1 


15. Dementia praecox 


5 


3 


8 


1 




1 


2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 




1 


1 
















1 1 


17. Epileptic psychoses 
























18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 
















1 1 


19. With psychopathic personality . 


1 




1 








1 




1 






20. With mental deficiency .... 




5 


5 




1 


1 




4 


4 






21. Undiagnosed psychoses .... 




1 


1 
















1 1 


22. Without psychosis 


1 




1 








1 




1 








21 


31 


52 


5 


4 


9 


10 


17 


27 


6 


10 16 



22 



P.D. 70 



Table 12. Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified with Reference to 

Principal Psychoses 

























Unascer- 




. Psychoses 




rotal 




Abstinent 


Temperate 


Intemperate 


tained 






M. 


F. 


T. 




p 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 






















2. 


Senile 


4 


4 


8 










_ ^ 






3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


6 


' 


13 






10 


2 


1 3 






4. 


General paralysis 


1 




1 
















5. 


V\ ith cerebral syphilis 






















6. 


With Huntington's chorea 






















7. 


With brain tumor 




















- - I 


8. 


With other brain or nervous 
























diseases .... 


1 


! 


2 


1 


1 


2 










9. 


Alcoholic 


1 


~ 


1 












1-1 




10. 


Due to drugs and other e.N:- 
























ogenous toxins 






















11. 


\\'ith pellagra .... 






















12. 


With other somatic diseases . 


1 


3 


4 




3 


3 








1 -- 1 


13. 


I\Ianic-depressive 




3 


3 




3 


3 










14. 


Involution melancholia . 






2 




2 


2 










15. 


Dementia praecox 


5 


I 


8 


4 


3 


7 






1 - 1 




16. 


Paranoia and para.ioid con- 
























ditions 




1 


1 




1 


1 












Epileptic psycliOS^;s 






















18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




1 


1 




1 


1 










19. 


With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 


1 




1 










20. 


With mental deficiency . 




5 


5 






5 










21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . 




1 


1 




1 


1 










22. 


Without psyciiosio . 


1 




1 








1 


1 










21 


31 


52 


12 


30 


42 


6 


1 7 


2-2 


1 - 1 



Table 13. Marital Condition of First Admissions Classified with Reference 
to Prircival Psychoses 



PSVCHOSE5 




Total 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Divorced 








p_ 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 


























2. 


Senile ----- 


4 


4 


S 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 


4 6 




3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


6 




13 


1 


1 


2 


3 


3 


6 


2 


3 5 




4. 


General paralysis 


1 




1 


1 




1 














5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 


























6. 


With Huntington s chorea 


























7. 


With brain tumor . 


























8. 


With other brain or nervous 




























diseases .... 


1 


1 


2 










1 


1 






1 - 1 


9. 




1 




1 


1 




1 














10. 


Due to drugs and other ex- 




























ogenous toxins 


























11. 


With pellagra .... 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases . 


1 


3 












2 


2 


1 


1 2 




13. 


Manic-depressive 




3 


3 




1 


1 




2 


2 








14. 


Involution melancholia . 




2 


2 










2 


2 








15. 


Dementia praecox . 


5 


3 


8 


5 


1 


6 




2 


2 








16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 




























ditions 




1 


1 










1 


1 








17. 


Epileptic psychoses 


























18. 


Psychoneuroses a id neuroses 




1 


1 










1 


1 








19. 


With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 


1 




1 














20. 


With mental deficiency . • . 






5 




2 


2 




3 


3 








21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . - . 




1 


1 










1 


1 








22. 


Without psychosis . 


1 




1 


















1 - 1 




Total 


^' 


31 


52 


10 




15 


4 


18 


22 


5 


8 13 


2-2 



P.D. 70 



2a 



Table 1^. Psjjchoses of Readmissions 

Psychoses Males Females Total 

1. Traumatic psychoses - - - 

2. Senile psychoses - - - 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis - - - 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 

6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 

7. Psychoses with brain tumor - - - 

8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases - - - 

9. Alcoholic psychoses 1 - 1 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . . . - - 

11. Psychoses with pellagra . . . . ' ' .' ' . '. _ _ _ 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases - 1 1 

1.?. Ma ic-depressive psychoses .2 4 6 

14. Involution melancholia - 1 1 

15. Dementia praecox 1 2 3 

16. Paranoia a id paranoid conditions - - - 

17. Epileptic psychores - - - 

18. Psyclioneuroses a id neuroses . . ... . . . - - - 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality - - - 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency 1 - 1 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses - - - 

22. Without psychosis - - - 

Total 5 8 13 



Table 15. Discharges of Patients Classified with Referevce to Principal Psychoses 

and Condition on Discharge 



Psychoses 



Total 



Recovered 



Improved 



M. 



1. Traumatic 

2. Senile . . . • - . . 

3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . . . 

4. General paralysis 

5. With cerebral sj'philis .... 

6. With Huntington's chorea 

7. With brain tumor 

8. With ether brain or nervous diseases 

Q. Alcoholic 

10. Due to drugs and otlier exogenous toxins 

1 1. W'th pellagra 

12. With other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive 

14. Involution melancholia . . . . 

15. Dementia praecox 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 

17. Epileptic psychoses 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses 

19. With psychopathic personality . 

20. With mental deficiency . . . . 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses . . . . 

22. Without psychosis 

Total 



M. F. T. 



M. F. T. 



1 1 



1 1 



1 1 

2 7 9 



26 33 



2 10 12 



5 10 15 



24 



P.D. 70 



o 



^1 



PO <N <-< >0 fO <0 



1 I ^ ^ 



Sot ^ 



o 



us OT O 

<s "ii ^ 



>< ;» OT 
ill 

OJ M C 



• S 



CO 
s> 
So 



OS'S 



11 

il 



o 

OT 6 



.52 o K 



.5 o 



P.D. 70 25 



Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses 



Psychoses 








20-24 


25-29 


30—34 


3S— 39 


40—44 




Total 




> ears 


years 


J ears 


years 


years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


I. Traumatic .... 


















2. SenUs 


4 


2 


6 












3. With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


4 


2 


6 












4. General paralysis 


2 




2 










1-1 


5. With cerebral syphilis 
















6. With Huntington's chorea 


















7. ^^■ith brain tumor . 


















8. With other brain or nervous 


















diseases .... 


2 


_ 


2 


1 - 1 










9. Alcoholic ..... 


3 


1 


4 












10. Due to drugs and other ex- 


















ogenous to.xins 


















11. With pellagra .... 


















12. \\ ith other somatic diseases . 


1 


_ 


1 












13. Manic-depressive 




2 


2 












14. Involution melancholia . 


















15. Dementia praecox 


15 


7 


22 




1 - 1 




1-1 


1 2 3 


16. Fi.ranoia and paranoid con- 


















ditions ..... 


















17. Epileptic psychoses . 


















18. Psychoneu roses and neuroses 


















19. With psychopathic personahty 
















20. With mental deficiency . 


















21. Undiagnosed psychoses . 


















22. Without psychosis . 




1 


1 








- 1 1 




Total 


31 


15 


46 


1 - 1 


1 - 1 




1 1 2 


2 2 4 



Table 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified ivith Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded 







45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65-69 


70 years 




Psychoses 


years 


years 


years 


years 


years 


and 


over 






AI. F. T. 


M F. T. 


M F. T. 


AI. F. T. 


AI. F. T. 


AI. 


F. T. 


1. 
































4 


2 6 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 




1 - 1 






- 1 1 


3 


1 4 


4. 


General paralysis 




1 - 1 














With cerebral syphilis 
















6. 


With Huntington's chorea 
















7. 


With brain tumor 
















8. 


With other brain or nervous 


















diseases 












1 


1 


9. 


.■\lcoholic 








2-2 




1 


1 2 


'0. 


Due to drugs and other exoge- 


















nous toxins .... 
















r.. 


With pellagra .... 
















12. 


With other somatic diseases 












1 


- 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive 














2 2 


14. 


Involution melancholia 
















15. 


Dementia praecox 


2-2 


1 1 2 


4-4 


1 2 3 


2-2 


2 


2 4 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid condi- 


















tions 
















17. 


Epileptic psychoses . 
















18. 


Psychoneu roses and neuroses . 
















19. 


With psychopathic personality 
















20. 


With mental deficiency 
















21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . . 
















22. 


Without psychosis 


















Total 


2-2 


3 1 4 


4-4 


3 2 5 


2 1 3 


12 


8 20 



20 



P.D. 70 

















3-4 
years 


)^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 

1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 

1 1 - 1 




1 1 1- 

, , , , 


rs 




H 






1 1 , 1 - 1 1 1 


, , , 






til 


1 - 1 1 1 1 


,11, 


1,1,-111 


, , , , 






















1 CN 1 1 




,,,,,,,! 


, , 1 , 






H 




, — , , 








8-12 
month 




I 1 1 1 1 


11,1 
1-11 


,,,,,,,, 
1 , 1 1 , , 1 1 


, , , , 
, 1 , , 






H 


1 <M 1 1 1 


,111 


,1,1,,,, 


1 , , , 


IN 


p» ~ 
1 C 
o 




1 - 1 1 1 


, 1 , , 


, 1 , , 1 1 , , 


, , , 1 




e 




1 - 1 1 1 


, , , , 


,.,,<,,, 


1,11 








11-11 






,11, 




1 a. 


til 


11-11 


, , , , 




1111 


- 


g 


^ 





1 1 1 1 


" ' 










1 1 "1 1 1 


, — , , 


,-,,,111 


.11, 




ss thar 
month 




11—11 


, , , , 


,,,,,,,, 


, . , , 








1 1 1 1 


, - 1 , 


1 - , , , 1 1 , 


II,, 


O 






1 O >0 1 


, , 


1 — cs 1 rs 1 1 ( 
rs 


1 1 1 — 


1 o 


)tal 




1 escs 1 1 


, 1 - i 


, 1 (N 1 I 1 1 






H 
















1 ■>* (M 1 


1 CS ( 


1^1 1 lO 1 1 1 







g ^ S 

'J a 73 aj M o 



!b— o— ^-^S aj 
x: Sx:. " 



•O -fcj .si • 



OJ ft s ~ ■Ji CO o. 

" u 2i >> S 9 ^ 



•-3 CS PC rjl uo \C OC) Ov" C — rs" ' 



P.D. 70 



27 



o 



CO 



5 S = 

OJ V ?J 

, ^ 

— , . •- aj ^ -c *j .j^ •- c 



^ o 
o =: 



J J", .t: .t; .t; u 3.-.- > 3 is ~ "i"---— c-^ 



28 



P.D. 70 



Table 19. Family Care Department 



Male Female Total 

Remaining iii Family Care, October 1. 1Q29 12 50 62 

On v isit from Family Care, October 1, 1929 - - - 

Admitted during the year 3 39 42 

Whole number of cases within the year 15 89 104 

Dismissed within the year: 

Returned to institution 5 32 37 

Discharged (died) - - 

On visit 1 - 1 

Remaining in Family Care, September 30. 1930 9 57 66 

Supported by State 8 55 63 

Private - 

Self-supporting 1 2 3 

Number of different persons within the year 6 35 41 

Number of different persons dismissed 3 30 33 

Number of different persons admitted 5 26 31 

Average daily number in Family Care during the year: 

Supported by State 8.779 48.778 57.557 

Private - - - 

Self-supporting . 1.766. 2.447 4.212 



Public Document 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



t^ ; Gardner State Colonyp^^^, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1931 



Department of Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
500. 6-'32. Order 5232. 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE COLONY 
GARDNER. MASS. 



/V 



STATE LIBRHRY OF M.SSSBCHOSFTT?^ 

GARDNER STATE COLONY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester. 
Richard T. Fishb«, Weaton.^' ^ t . "^TCN 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner. ^awtttpYaT 
Miss Grace Nichols, Boston. ^^^^^"^^^"^'^ 
George A. Marshall, Fitchburg. 
Thomas H. Shea, Fitchburg. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
Henry L. Clow, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
Harold K. Marshall, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mary Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Nathan C. Robey, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Lee W. Darrah, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. Marr, Steward. 
Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Ball, Engineer. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Friberg, Social Worker. 

Mary Anne Chisholm, R.N., Principal of the School of Nursing. 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A. Greenb, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
HjARRY E. Whitehouse, SupcrvisoT of Weaving, Knitting etc. 
Newton E. Smallwood, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Neilson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
Anthony P. Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Elof R. Teir, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS 
Viola Farnham, G.N., Women's Infirmary. 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, G.N., Women's Hospital Building. 
Martha Wight, G.N., Men's Hospital Building. 
Elvira I. Wincitenbach, G.N., Women's Treatment Building. 
MoNA Bishop, G.N., M^n's Treatment Building. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES 
Rev. James T. Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT 
To His Excellency, the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees have the honor to present herewith the twenty-ninth Annual 
Report of the Gardner State Colony. 

Attention is invited to the careful and detailed report of the Superintendent. 

There has been an increase in the number of patients cared for by the Gardner 
State Colony and there has been a gradual increase for some years in the average 
age of the patients. Whereas the Gardner State Colony, as its name implies, was 
originally built to provide a group of separate colonies where able-bodied patients 
could work upon the land and produce much toward their own support, there has 
gradually taken effect a departure from this principle. No new colonies have been 
built for a number of years. Our original patients are now old and patients received 



.D. 70 



3 



from other institutions have often been elderly. This has meant that there is a 
larger percentage of the hospital and infirmary type of patients than was formerly 
the case. It seems a pity that there should not be a continued development of the 
colony idea. It was a sound conception and the trustees know of no sufficient 
reason why it should be abandoned. They recommend the building of another 
colony group of buildings largely by the labor of the patients and they recommend 
that able-bodied patients be sent to this institution to live in these buildings when 
erected, to clear the land and raise farm and garden products. 

The industries at which patients work at this institution, aside from farming, 
are principally the weaving of cloth and making garments from it, the making of 
rugs, the manufacture of boots and shoes, furniture, printing, and the canning of 
farm products. Attention is invited to the fact that the colony has produced in its 
own shops all the dress material for women's dresses, all the material for overalls, 
jumpers and shirts for men, towelling, stockings and a considerable portion of the 
sheeting used and all the blankets and bed spreads. The printing department 
has done all the printing of forms and reports of the Department of Mental Diseases 
and the sixteen departments under its supervision. All articles of wearing apparel 
have been made here for a number of years, none purchased. The shoe department 
makes all shoes that are worn and the furniture department makes the furniture 
for the institution, including that necessary to furnish new buildings. The cannery 
has taken care of surplus vegetables and fruits, amounting to 13,788 gallons during 
the year in review. 

This brief synopsis of the work done by patients seems to the trustees to show 
the very creditable contribution made by the patients toward their own support. 
No attempt has been made to list what has been produced in the farm and garden. 
Attention is invited to the details of all this, as listed in the superintendent's report. 
There will also be found there a statement of the work done in the clearing of fields, 
construction of roads and buildings, wood cutting and sawing and reforestation. 

The trustees record their satisfaction in the completion and occupation of the 
hospital building. They are further gratified that work has begun upon the new 
heating plant. 
Needs of the Colony: 

The superintendent, in his report, lists seven needs, each of which involves the 
considerable expenditure of money. Of these the trustees wish to emphasize the 
following: 

1. A group of buildings for an additional colony to house thirty-five patients. 

2. Construction of a new cow tie-up and barn for hay. The present arrangement 
is too great a fire risk. The close connection of dairy, horse stable and cow barn 
is not an ideal one. 

3. A superintendent's house. The trustees repeat what they said in their reports 
for the years 1925 and 1930: 

"The Trustees consider that a Superintendent's house is most important 
for the well-being of the State Colony. The Superintendent and his 
family are entitled to living quarters which will take him away from the 
strain of his daily association with patients and business. The high 
character of our hospitals for the insane can only be maintained by having 
at the head of them, men of capacity, humanity and professional skill. 
Such men can only be procured in the long run when they are given proper 
conditions under which to live and do their work." 

4. Replacing of buildings of two colonies, now in uncomfortable and inadequate 
old farm houses. 

The other recommendations contained in the Superintendent's report are im- 
portant. The trustees feel that they should be carried out as soon as the finances 
of the Commonwealth make it possible. Every effort is being made to put into 
effect all economies consistent with the well-being of the patients. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Amie H. Goes Grace Nichols 

Owen A. Hoban R. T. Fisher 

George A. Marshall Frederic A. Washburn 

February 20, 1932. 



4 



P.D. 70 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

I herewith respectfully present my Annual Report as Superintendent of the 
Gardner ^tate Colony. In matters relating to patients the hospital year ends 
September 30, 1931, and in matters of finance November 30, 1931. 

Movement of Population 
On September 30, 1930, there remained on the books of the institution 1,314 
patients of whom 1,190 were in actual residence and 124 on parole or otherwise 
absent. During the year we have received 199 patients, 120 of whom were receive 
received by direct admission and 79 by transfer from other hospitals. Of the 120 
direct admissions, 97 were admitted for the first time to any hospital, 23 had had 
previous hospital residence. E^ight-one have been discharged and 57 have been 
removed by death. The total number discharged and died was 138 compared with 
199 admitted. 

Changes above noted having occurred during the year, there remained 1,375 
patients at the end of the year, 1,230 of whom are actually resident and 145 on 
parole or otherwise absent. In comparison with the previous year there have been 
82 more under care and at the end of the year an actual increase of 40 resident and 
21 non-resident patients. At the end of this hospital year there were under care 
133 patients more than at the same period three years ago and 257 more than the 
same period five years ago. This increase is due to additional facilities for care and 
has no absolute relation to any increase in the general population. 

Cared for in families under supervision there were 66 at the beginning of the 
year and 75 at the end of the year. The form of mental disease in the 97 admitted 
for the first time to any hospital was senile psychoses 9.28%; psychoses with 
cerebral arteriosclerosis 10.31%; general paralysis 4.12%; dementia praecox 
11.34%; psychoses with other somatic diseases 19.58%; psychoses with mental 
deficiency 7.22%; alcoholic psychoses 8.25% ; paranoid conditions 1.03%; manic- 
depressive psychoses 8.25%; neuroses 4.12% and without psychoses 16.50%. In 
admissions there are 2 rather extremes: 19.5% of those admitted show senile 
psychoses or psychoses with arteriosclerosis whereas 16.50 % were without psychoses 
This is due first to the fact that there is an increasing tendency to commit elderly 
persons to the care of the State and second there is an increasing tendency to commit 
other types of patients to a hospital because of primary physical conditions. An 
analysis of the 16.50% without psychoses shows the following conditions: one 
Huntington's chorea; 1 encephalitis lethergica; 2 not psychotic; 2 psychopathic 
personality; 3 drug addiction; 2 chronic alcoholism; 1 multiple sclerosis; 1 epilepsy 
and 5 psychoneuroses. 

The chief assigned causes of mental illness in the 97 first admissions are: senility 
and arteriosclerosis 19; poor mental endowment 17; somatic disease 14; alcohol 
8; mental deficiency 7 and syphilis 4. Of interest is the fact that in those admitted 
for the first time to any hospital 34.25% were discharged within the same hospital 
year. Of note also is the age at the time of death of those 57 who died: 33 % were 
over 70 years of age; 43% were between 50 and 70 years of age; only 23% were 
under 50 years of age. The principle causes of death were: cardiovascular diseases 
51.7%; tuberculosis 16%; carcinoma 7.1% and syphilis 5,3%. 

It is noticeable that with the passage of time the ratio of the infirmary and 
hospital population is rather rapidly increasing due both to the fact that more 
aged persons are now being received and those who were received by transfer in 
past years are now reaching advanced years. 

ExTKA Mural Activities 
There has been an increasing demand for our assistance in the mental hygiene 
field. This reached such a point this year that a psychiatrist, a psychiatric social 
worker, a psychologist and clerk have been added to the staff whose activities will 
be almost entirely devoted to the examination of backward children in the public 
schools, child guidance, the nursery school and the regular monthly clinics for adults. 
There are 30 towns in the district of this hospital which refer children to us for 
examination. There have been 125 backward children in public schools examined 



P.D. 70 



5 



and reported upon. These examinations showed that 39 were feeble-minded; 48 
borderline; 38 dull normal. Recommendations were made as follows: Special 
classes 59; continue in the same grade 51; institutional care 5; home care 4; 
school for the deaf 1; reached scholastic attainment 5. 

Child Guidance work which is comparatively new is growing rapidly. The 
demands for this work reached a point where our regular Medical Staff could not 
do the work required. With the additional staff provided we have established 
regular clinic days at Fitchburg, Gardner and Athol. It is most encouraging to 
note the rapid interest in Child Guidance and how quickly the general public has 
seen the importance of it. There have been 96 children studied most of them during 
the last half of the year since the travelling clinic was organized. 

This work is being carried on with the cooperation of and for the benefit of 
parents, various social agencies and physicians. Following the completion of 
studies by the clinic staff all cases are reviewed by the hospital medical staff and 
findings and recommendations are presented to the person who presents the case 
for study. Thus far these cases seem to have been referred by the Court as re- 
quired by the statutes, by school authorities and social agencies, rather than 
physicians. Findings indicate that these children present social problems rather 
than medical. 

The Nursery School established in Fitchburg in cooperation with the Fitchburg 
Normal School and the Superintendent of the Schools of Fitchburg proved so 
successful the first year that the parents of the children made special effort to have 
it financed for a second year and in spite of material odds were successful in doing 
this so that it is now operating in its second year with an enrollment of eighteen 
children from two to four years of age. It is interesting to note the unanimous 
feeling on the part of the parents of its value and on the part of the Principal of the 
Fitchburg Normal School for its value in training students. 

The regular social service work of the colony has been continued, special study 
being conducted of each new patient received. All patients discharged have been 
followed up. Approximately 800 visits have been made by the Social Service 
Worker and 234 visits were made to patients on visit. This work permits us to 
have a complete picture of the patients environment and reaction to it before ad- 
mission and later to supervise those who leave the hospital on visit. It also permits 
a re-adjustment of unfavorable situations which lead up to the need of hospital care. 
The part which family relationship and home environment play are now being 
better understood and re-adjustments are possible. It is possible also to discharge 
a large number of patients under supervision. This results in a direct benefit to 
the patient, protection to society and incidentally the hospital. 

General Medical 

Dr. Lonnie O. Farrar a member of the Medical Staff since March 1, 1922, and 
Assistant Superintendent since October 14, 1926, resigned by transfer to the 
Worcester State Hospital, June 30, 1931. He was untiring in his work and his 
service was of a high order. His special interest in preventative work notably 
child guidance caused him to wish to enter a larger field to perfect himself in this 
speciality. 

Dr. Henry L. Clow, a graduate of Tufts Medical School and a member of the 
Staff of the Metropolitan State Hospital, was appointed to succeed Dr. Farrar 
as Assistant Superintendent from September 1, 1931. 

Dr. William A Hunter, a graduate of McGill University and Assistant Physician 
since September 27, 1929, was assigned June 1, 1931, to direct all extra mural 
activities. 

Dr. Nathan C. Robey, a graduate of Yale University, was appointed as Assistant 
Physician, June 6, 1931. 

An additional physician. Dr. Lee W. Darrah, a graduate of the University of 
Pittsburg, was appointed to the Staff November 30, 1931. 

Miss Mary Bolger served as Clinical Assistant from June 8 to October 6, 1931. 

Dr. Rebekah B. Wright, Hydrotherapist of the Department of Mental Diseases, 
joined our Staff during August, September and October giving instruction to the 
Medical and Nursing Staff in the best methods of procedure in hydrotherapeutic 
treatment and her services are gratefully acknowledged. 



6 



P.D. 70 



Dr. Frederick P. Moore and Dr. Harold K. Marshall both graduates of Harvard 
University have continued to give the same high type of service which has char- 
acterized their previous work. 

Our Consulting Staff has given us their active cooperation during the year and 
we are indebted to the following for their services: Dr. A. F. Lowell, of Gardner, 
Surgeon; Dr. Herman D. Bone, Gardner, Opthalmogist; Dr. George A. Mossman, 
Gardner, Orthepedic Surgeon; Dr. C. H. Jennings, Fitchburg, Roentenologist. 

The following meetings and gatherings have been held at the colony during the 
year: Men's Service Clubs of Gardner, April 29, with 175 present; Fitchburg 
Council of Social Agencies, May 26, with 40 present; A class of Fitchburg Normal 
School Students, July 29, with 20 present; The Wachusett Dental Society, October 
21, with 75 present; The Worcester North District Medical Society, October 27, 
with 70 present. At all of these meetings appropriate talks on mental*illness with 
particular reference to preventative measures were given by members of the Medical 
Staff and others by invitation. 

General Health 

While there has been the usual amount of illness in our entire population there 
has been no outbreak of any serious disease. One case of scarlet fever was found 
in a new admission but prompt isolation prevented its spread and in this case 
prompt recovery of the existing mental condition followed serum treatment of the 
scarlet fever. 

There were fourteen major operations performed. 

I Special Treatment 

The more important methods of treatment during the year have been treatment 
by hydrotherapy, physical-therapy, and occupational therapy. 

Hydrotherapy. With the completion of a Treatment Building for Men we now 
have rather complete facilities for treatment by continuous bath, wet sheet envelop- 
ment, tonic treatment and colonic irrigation. There were 3,994 continuous bath 
treatments given. This form of treatment has shown beneficial results in a con- 
siderable number of cases and is still one important method of treatment. 

Packs. An unsatisfactory designation for wet sheet envelopments. They have 
been continued where indicated but our desire has been to reduce this form of 
treatment to a minimum. 

Colonic Irrigation. With this form of treatment established here in May, 1930, 
a large and increasing number of patients have been treated and with rather sur- 
prising and unexpected results. It was found in a short time that colonic irrigation 
was taking the place of wet sheet envelopments and to a certain extent of continuous 
baths and we have been impressed by statements of patients themselves as to the 
benefits they have experienced. It is, in our opinion, a most rational form of treat- 
ment in cases of mental illness. While there does not appear to be any specific 
action in colonic irrigation it does seem to aid in combatting a number of abnormal 
conditions. By cleaning out the colon the system is afforded relief from human 
metabolic processes; by the absorption of fluid from the colon which takes place 
during treatments dehydration is relieved; by mechanical cleansing action clean- 
liness is promoted. This treatment has resulted in a rapid return to normal stability 
in favorable cases. Sedation has also been obtained in a number of active cases 
and this has shown, as mentioned, in the reduction in the number of wet sheet 
envelopments applied. The reduction was from upward of 600 per month to less 
than 10 per month with some months none at all. This treatment is now actively 
carried on and 4 units are in use. There have been 3,000 treatments given and 3,728 
fewer packs were found necessary than during the year previous. 

Physical-therapy. This department operates daily and has been of decided 
benefit. Through the use of the ultra violet ray marked benefit has been noticed, 
especially in catatonic praecox cases and in local lesions needing stimulation. Infra- 
red is used in all cases as an adjunct to the ultra violet ray. By the use of diathermy 
relief from pain and discomfort has been noted and locally promotion of absorption. 
It has been of special benefit in the treatment of myalgia and pleurisy without 
effusion. In local infection the ultra violet has been of marked benefit. In cases 



i P.D. 70 7 

! of constipation, prolapse of rectum and high blood pressure relief has been obtained 
I by the use of the high frequency current. In all cases treated at the Physical- 
therapy Department, there appears to be improvement in physical health with 
improved appetite. 

Personal Hygiene. This is used as an aid in the treatment of women as an ad- 
junct to other treatments received. It has been decidedly worth while. It assists 
a patient to assist herself which is so important. There is perhaps no better way 
of assisting and encouraging one's self respect than encouraging interest in personal 
appearance. In this department there were 10,269 treatments given. Some 2,000 
of these treatments were given for troublesome conditions of the feet, callouses, 
i bunions, ingrowing nails, etc., which has resulted in greater comfort and in some 
I cases a relief from pain and suffering which may have some part in aggravating the 
mental condition. 

I Occupational Therapy. As occupation was the primary object of the establish- 
ment of the colony so occupational therapy and industrial therapy have been 
continued actively. 

j Occupational Therapy has been chiefly carried on in the occupational building 
I where an average of 125 women have been engaged in a variety of diversions and 
occupations and where over 200 different patients have been treated during the 
year. In addition to this, classes have been continued in the various hospital build- 
ings and colonies under the direction of Mrs. Lillian A. Greene, Chief Occupational 
Therapist. Realization of the value of occupational therapy is constantly being 
stressed and interest shown in the entire work has, I believe, been more marked 
this year than previously. This is due in part to the establishment of additional 
classes in various departments and with the additional facilities for these classes. 
At the present time, changes are being made which will permit the removal from 
the occupational therapy department of those industries which are not strictly 
therapeutic measures but which are, nevertheless, just as valuable in the treatment 
of our patients. We have never been of the opinion that worth while occupation 
and industry should be divorced entirely from therapy in the strictest sense as our 
adult population differs, but little from the adult population in any environment 
and finds satisfaction in accomplishment. The making of a dress may be more 
valuable as a therapeutic measure than some simpler articles made purely because 
of their diversional value and we are ever inclined to direct worth while activities 
but never lose sight of the value of simpler diversions. 

During the year 25,110 articles of clothing were made by women and 16,369 
articles other than clothing such as household articles, novelties, etc., were 
manufactured. There were 24,972 articles mended; 1,108 pieces of fancy work 
made; 156 yards of lace and 1,796 pounds of material dyed. 

Activities in the men's department have been continued also and special mention 
should be made of the increased activities of the Textile Department where denim, 
gingham, towelling, sheeting, blankets, bedspreads, etc., are manufactured. The 
total amount of cloth woven during the year was 27,968 yards. In addition 1,792 
brooms and brushes of various kinds were made and 200 mattresses and pillows, 
also 6,539 stockings knitted. There were 365 articles repaired. 

The Tailoring Department has continued to make all articles of wearing apparel 
for men including 822 coats, 378 trousers, 23 vests and 1 overcoat. All articles 
of wearing apparel for women are also cut out in this department but are made by 
the women in the women's departments. The total number of pieces cut out during 
the year is 11,222 and 4,832 were repaired and pressed. 

The Furniture Department continues to make all furniture including that 
necessary to furnish new buildings and the total number of pieces made during the 
year is 2,505 and repaired 5,034. 

All shoes are made and repaired in our shoe department the total number for the 
year including shoes, slippers, brogans, being 1,297. The total number of shoes, 
slippers, brogans, and other articles repaired totalled 4,799. 

The Printing Department, housed in new quarters, has done all printing of forms 
and reports for the Department of Mental Diseases and the sixteen hospitals and 
schools under its supervision. , 



8 



P.D. 70 



The Cannery has taken care of surplus vegetables and fruits sending this year 
to the store 13,788 gallons in various size containers. The value of this department 
is not alone the product but it has been markedly beneficial to the large group of 
women employed who come chiefly from the Treatment Building and who cannot 
otherwise enjoy our out-of-door privileges. 

Dental Department 
This department under the direction of J. Herbert Maycock, D.D.S., has been 
active through the year. The importance of this work cannot be over emphasized. 



The following work has been done: 

Number of patients treated 4,103 

Examinations 3,137 

Prophylaxes 1,794 

Fillings 391 

(Amalgam, 194; cement, 22; synthetic, 54; guttapercha, 120; gold, 1.) 
Extractions 765 

(Local anesthesia, 717; general anesthesia, 48.) 

5^ost operative treatments 369 

Minor surgical operations 197 

(Abscesses, 44; surgical extractions, 58; bridges removed, 1; corrected 

occlusion, 9; root resection, 58; surgical treatment for pyorrhea, 9; 

alveolectomy, 18.) 

Root canal treatment 114 

Root canal fillings 76 

Treatment for pathological conditions 33 

(For pyorrhea, 6; for Vincent's Angina, 27.) 

Miscellaneous treatments for Pathological Conditions 97 

Plate Work: 

(Plates made, 22; adjusted, 26; polished, 1; repaired, 34.) 

Gold Shell Crowns 2 

X-rays taken 124 



Nursing 

Prior to 1930 general instruction and demonstrations were given attendants. 
In September, 1930, a School for Psychiatric Training, a two year course, was 
established and Miss Mary A. Chisholm, R. N., was appointed Principal of the 
Training School. Twenty-five pupils entered the course for 1931. Changes in 
personnel have occurred and there remained 8 in the service to complete the course 
in June. Twenty-four students were enrolled in the Junior class in September. 
Much interest is shown in this course by the students and satisfactory progress 
in training is being made. 

Our entire hospital department has been better organized this year than in any 
former period due to the fact that a larger number of trained nurses have been 
appointed to supervisor and assistant supervisor positions. 

Diversion 

All special holidays have been appropriately observed as heretofore. The 
Christmas season is perhaps the time most looked forward to and was appropriately 
observed. On Christmas day a play "David Harum" was given with a musical 
by the Scivens-Mahler Duo. 

Next to Christmas season in importance is our Field Day which was held Septem- 
ber 29. There were 730 patients entertained throughout the day out of doors. 

Perhaps next comes July Fourth, when an all day out of door program was 
arranged. 

Motion pictures seem still to be the form of entertainment most desired and 
pictures were shown weekly during the winter months. Dances at which music 
was furnished by the Colony Band have been much enjoyed. 

Special effort has been made to increase the attendance at church services. Of 
special merit is the music for these services. Choirs provide music for both morning 
and afternoon services, of a, character deserving very special mention. 



P.D. 70 



9 



A minstrel show was provided by the Legion Social Club of Ashburnham on 
April 30. Dr. Arthur Rudman delivered an address to employees on "Influence" 
by invitation. The American Legion Drum Corps, 36 in number, visited and 
entertained by a parade and manoeuvers. 

During the winter months sleigh rides were enjoyed by patients. Two enter- 
tainments were provided by local talent by the employees. Band concerts have 
been provided both in and out of doors by the Colony Band. Base ball games 
were of special interest to the men and were played several times weekly during 
the summer. 

Farm 

Farm operations during the year have been very satisfactory under the direction 
of Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 

We had under cultivation 155 acres and in addition 121 acres in hay. 155 acres 
were planted as follows: 24 acres in potatoes; 75 acres in garden crops; 30 acres 
in ensilage corn; 24 acres in oats and seeded and 2 acres in mangles. The yield in 
potatoes was rather exceptional, 7,589 bushels, an average of 316 bushels per acre. 
The total value of this crop was $7,973.11. 400 tons of ensilage corn was harvested 
with a value of $2,400. The value of the 75 acres of garden crop was $15,242.17. 
The value of the orchard and fruit crop was $1,559.73. 

Dairy. The herd passed the State and Federal test this year for the fifth year. 
An average of 58 cows for the year produced an average of 13,538.89 lbs. per cow 
with 3.9% butter fat. The total amount of milk produced was 759,816 lbs. having 
a value of $37,004.87 and the total cost of operating the dairy, including labor, 
board, etc., was $23,017.74. The total credit amounted to $40,260.49. There was 
a gain in inventory. At the beginning of the year the total inventory was $24,072.38 
and at the end of the year the inventory was $26,032.48. The dairy, therefore, 
made a gain of $19,202.85. The gross cost of producing milk was $.0291 per pound 
and the net cost was $.0250 per pound. There has been but one case of abortion 
"in the herd this year and this anim.al was at once slaughtered pursuant to our 
practise. 

Again this year, as last, an outbreak of sickness in our young stock in pasture 
occurred with a loss of fourteen heifers and four steers. These animals were 
supposedly immunized against hemorrhagic septicaemia before going to pasture 
and at the time of the outbreak ever effort was made, with the assistance of the 
State Division of Animal Industry, to determine the cause but no satisfactory 
diagnosis was arrived at. The situation having arisen two years in succession in- 
dicates to us that we should not have our young stock in pasture during July and 
August. 

Toward the close of the year we purchased six pure bred heifers from dams pro- 
ducing over 20,000 lbs. of milk. A registered bull was also purchased whose dam 
produced over 29,000 lbs. of milk in one year. These animals with several pur- 
chased in previous years will form the foundation of our herd of the future. 

The breeding of swine demands and has received special attention. Immuniza- 
tion against hog cholera has been practised, as in the past three years, using a 
larger amount of virus and apparently this has been justified as we have had no 
serious sickness or losses among our swine during these years. At the beginning of 
last year our swine totalled 282, at the end of the year 316. During the year 
48,838 H lbs. of pork was produced. The total cost of operating the piggery was 
$8,146.24 and the total credits were $8,257.55. There was an increase in inventory 
value during the year with the resulting gain of $1,626.76. Mention was made 
last year of the purchase of pure bred duroc stock and from these we have at the 
present time 56 head of pure bred stock and from these we will breed this year. 
We also from this pure bred stock supplied other state institutions with 15 pure 
bred boars. 

Poultry. 2,000 day old chicks were purchased. Losses were small, 3.4%. The 
total value of the production of this department was $7,816.99 and the total cost 
of operating the department was $4,563.58. There was a marked increase in 
inventory $3,321.01. 



10 



P.D. 70 



Miscellaneous Activities. A large amount of work has been done in clearing fields. 
The rock is used in the construction of roads and buildings. An estimate of the 
rock removed from fields is 10,510 tons; 4,930 tons of rock was excavated; 3,749 
tons of rock was crushed for road work. 5,560 cubic yards of earth was excavated; 
22 acres of land was cleared of underbrush; 4 li acres of land was cleared for farm; 
310 cords of wood was cut and sawed; 98,035 feet of lumber was cut and sawed: 
2,400 tons of ice was harvested. 

We have continued reforestation work this year and the following were set out: 
4,000 red pine seedlings; 2,000 Scotch pine seedlings; 1,500 Australian pine seed- 
lings; and 750 Norway spruce. 

Apple trees set out during the year were as follows: 48 Baldwins; 10 Delicious; 
30 Mcintosh; 25 Rhode Island Greenings. 

Data regarding farm operations, production, etc., may be found in tables follow- 
ing this report. 

The usual number of repairs have been completed in all buildings and they are 
in good repair. Many buildings have been painted inside and out. Constant 
repairs are necessary in plumbing and much old work has been renewed and is in 
good repair. 

At the main kitchen a partial new floor and new flpor drains have been installed 
also new aluminum kettles have replaced old iron kettles. 

Asbestos shingles have replaced wood shingles on four buildings. 

The original twenty-one pair telephone cable was out grown and has been re- 
placed by a fifty-one pair cable. 

Automatic circuit breakers have been installed in the high tension electric line 
by the Gardner Electric Light Company and very few interruptions in current 
have occurred since. 

An addition to the garage for physicians has been built. 

New hot water heaters have been installed in several of the cottages. 

Repairs Not Recurring Annually 

1. Coal trestle repairs. Unusual repairs are made each year owing to the age of 
the coal trestle and these have been made this year as required by the Boston 
and Maine Railroad. The new heating plant under construction will cause the 
abandonment of the present trestle. 

2. Re-building main road. One half mile of road directly adjacent to the office 
has been entirely re-built and a permanent tarvia road is now in use. 

3. Mesh grilles. Fire escapes on the two infirmaries have been enclosed with 
mesh grilles making them safe for use in emergencies as well as preventing their 
use as not intended. 

4. Asbestos roofing. The following buildings have been covered with asbestos 
shingles replacing wood shingles: Westminster Cottag , Gardner Cottage, two 
industrial buildings. Practically all occupied buildings are now covered with fire- 
proof shingles. 

5. Laundry equipment. An additional tumbler dryer and extractor have been 
installed. 

6. Extension of fire alarm. The installation of a fire alarm system begun last 
year has been continued this year. Fifteen fire alarms boxes have been installed 
together with the necessary apparatus at the Power House including an automatic 
whistle blowing device. The Gamewell system was installed. 

7. Machine shop equipment. An oxy-acetylene welding outfit has been installed. 

8. Barn group. Pens and out door yards have been constructed for the care of 
bulls as have also pens and out door yards for young stock. The barn formerly 
occupied by bulls has been entirely made over into a horse barn and is in use. 
The space formerly occupied by horses, adjacent to the cow barn, has been made 
over and this is now occupied by cows. 

9. Talking movie apparatus. An appropriation is available for the installation 
of talking pictures but the type of machine has not as yet been decided upon. 

Special Appropriations 
1. The printery building under construction in 1930 was completed and occupied 
in July 1931. The plan for this building originally called for a one-story building 



I P.D. 70 11 

I for printing purposes only but it seemed advisable to finish a basement floor 
I and this is now occupied by the Textile Department with the Printing Department 
on the ground floor. It is an admirable building for the purpose. 

2. The hospital building under construction at the time of the last report was 
completed and occupied in July 1931. 

3. An appropriation of $10,000 provided for the construction of a cow barn. 
Plans for this were drawn but approval has not yet been received and construction 
has not been started. 

4. New Heating Plant: An appropriation of $150,000 was made available for 
a new heating plant in a new location. Construction is at this time underway 
under the direction of the Department of Mental. Diseases. 

5. Employees' Cottage: An appropriation of $14,000 was made available for 
the construction of an additional employees' cottage and plans have been prepared 
and submitted for approval as required. Approval has not yet been received and 
construction has not been started. 

6. Sewage Disposal: An appropriation of $12,850 provided for additional sewer 
beds at the Westminster Cottages and another at a group of smaller cottages to be 
located at the rear of the Highland Cottage. The work thus far has been upon the 
beds planned for the Westminster Cottages. 

7. Furnishings — Hospital Building: $9,300 was made available for furnishings 
in the Hospital Building then under construction. The major portion of the fur- 
nishings planned have been purchased and are in use. 

8. The sum of $10,000 was appropriated for the construction of a coal trestle. 
This has become a part of the plan for the new heating plant. Construction of this 
is underway. 

Maintenance 

The appropriation for general maintenance for 1931 was $475,800, of which 
$448,393.72 was expended. During the year the average number of patients has 
been 1,275.281. The net weekly per capita cost was $6.15. The gross weekly per 
capita cost $6.76 for 1931 was twenty-five cents less than that of the previous year. 



$7.01, or a decrease of 3.59c. 

Budget estimates for 1932 are as follows: 

Personal services $251,850.00 

Travel, transportation and office expenses .... 4,956.00 

Food 67,620.00 

Clothing and materials 15,190.00 

Furnishings and household supplies 20,580.00 

Medical and general care 29^416.00 

Religious instruction 1,900.00 

Heat, light and power 40,285 .00 

Farm 33,500.00 

Garage, stables and grounds 5,409 . 00 

Repairs and renewals 15,200.00 



Total $491,406.00 



This budget is submitted on October 15 of the previous year and must provide 
for all contingencies for the following year. It is, of course, subject to study and 
revision as the general financial policy of the Commonwealth demands. Prepared 
carefully and according to the regulations governing the preparation of the budget, 
it is understood that the amount is in excess of that thought actually necessary if 
a policy of rigid economy is to be followed. 

Future Development 

I would respectfully present the following recommendations for further and 
needed development of the Colony as finances permit. 

1. Storehouse and cold storage. There is urgent need of a building constructed 
solely for the purpose of the reception, storage and distribution of all supplies. 
At the present time such storage is located in the freight house where it is impossible 
to carry in stock much more than our food stuffs and all other supplies have to be 



12 



P.D. 70 



distributed in other departments for storage. This is not proper as a matter of 
policy and makes accounting difficult and not conducive to economy. In construct- 
ing a storehouse a cold storage equipment should be included to allow us to purchase 
and store food stuffs to advantage. There is urgent need of such a storehouse with 
cold storage and ice making facilities. 

2. Reception Building for fifty patients: As previously outlined, this building 
would provide for the reception of those patients coming directly from their homes 
and admitted for the first time to any hospital. The present surroundings to which 
they come are not conducive to the betterment of their mental condition and some- 
thing should be done to obviate this. At the same time there is a growing need for 
the reception of a certain class of patients in the early stages of mental or nervous 
trouble seen in our out-patient service who could materially benefit by earlier 
treatment but who hesitate to enter a hospital. In these cases delay may be of 
serious consequence. 

The time is coming too when provision should be made for opportunity for further 
study of delinquents. At the present time we are examining youths brought before 
the Juvenile Court, the disposition of whose case depends largely upon our examina- 
tion and report. It is not desirable or fair to submit a report upon one relatively 
short examination which will mean so much to the individual examined. At present 
there is no legal provision for the admission and study of these juvenile delinquents 
but if, in the future, a longer study is found desirable, as I believe it will be, then 
suitable provision will be needed. Such a reception building would serve as a center 
for extra mural activities. All social welfare work would be centered here. It would 
be the center of research work in the ever and rapidly growing field of mental 
hygiene. Such a building would be somewhat removed from the present group 
and should be operated and conducted more as a general hospital. In the past 
several years excellent buildings have been provided for hospital careand treatment 
of difficult mental patients and I believe that the addition of a building as described 
would be a real step forward in state hospital development. 

3. CozL' ham. With the growth of the institution, an increase in the number of 
cows is necessary which makes it imperative that another cow tie-up for fifty cows 
be provided. At the present time our young stock and heifers that have been bred 
are cared for in distant barns and are not receiving the care and supervision that 
they should and would receive if at a central farm group. Additional space is 
absolutely necessary and should be provided. 

4. Hay storage. There is need of a central storage barn for hay and feed which 
is now improperly stored in various places resulting in much handling, improper 
mixing of grains and less control over its use. All livestock should be centralized 
as should also the feed for them. 

5. Colony Group for thirty-five patients. As previously suggested, an additional 
colony for thirty-five patients and five employees might well be constructed by 
our own labor if the need for caring for additional numbers makes a building pro- 
gram necessary. The advantage of colony groups is that they are much less 
expensive to construct and may be placed in a location where the land may be 
cleared and developed into farm land. An additional colony is suggested in 
accordance with the original plan of the development of the colony to care for 
those who do not require the more expensive hospital facilities and supervision. 

6. Purchase of land. I again bring to your attention the desirability of purchasing 
a tract of seventeen acres of land, adjacent to the colony which purchase is sug- 
gested for the protection of the colony from future encroachment. 

7. Superintendent' s House. 

I take this opportunity to thank the many friends of the Colony for their assis- 
tance during the year which they have expressed in many ways. Thanks are due 
to those who have generously given us newspapers, magazines, library books and 
many articles for the Occupational Therapy Department. 

To the officers of the Colony I would express my appreciation for their efforts 
in behalf of the patients and for their cooperation. The success of the Colony 
depends upon their cooperation and whatever success may have been attained is 
due very largely to this. 



P.D. 70 



13 



To you. the Board of Trustees printed words cannot express my full appreciation 
of your support, help and advice, and to express my sincere thanks for your assis- 
tance and encouragement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 

Productions for 1931 



Garden Vegetables $15,252 . 60 

Fruit and berries 1,559.73 

Potatoes 7,973.11 

Mangles 101.79 

Milk 37,005.47 

Beef 1,191.65 

Beef, oxen 360.45 

Pork 7,475.78 

Eggs 4,735.43 

Rabbit 41.70 

Poultry 2,854.65 

Ensilage corn 2,400.00 

Oats, green oats and oat straw 673. 16 

Hay, clover 919 .60 

Hay, timothy 1,544.40 

Alfalfa, green 346.50 

Clover, green 259.00 

Hay, meadow 217.00 



Total $84,912.02 

Maple syrup $26 . 95 

Honey 9 . 60 

Lumber cut: 

Hemlock, 10,928 feet $710.32 

Spruce 1,140 feet 74.10 

Pine 82,523 feet 5,776.61 

Oak 1,400 feet 98.00 

Maple 1,100 feet 77.00 

Chestnut 942 feet 65.94 

Woodcut 310 cords 3,100.00 

Sawdust 30 cords 30.00 

Ice 2,400 tons 13,200.00 

Stone crashed 3,359 H tons 5,039.63 



REFOREST.A.TIOX 

Four thousand 4-year red pine seedlings, two thousand 4-year Scotch pine 
seedlings, fifteen hundred 4-year Australian pine seedlings and seventy-five hundred 
Norway spruce seedlings were set out during the year. 

35 Cottontail Rabbits were shipped from here to other localities. 

25 Golden Pheasants were received by us on August 21st. 



Acreage of Crops 

Acres Acres 

Ensilage corn . . .30.0 Potatoes 24 . 

Oats 24.0 Garden 75.0 

Hay 121.7 Fruit and Orchard . .30.0 

Mangles 2.0 Pasture 88.34 

Meadow Hay . .65 .0 

Total 460.04 



Stones totaling 10,510 tons were removed from the fields; 4,390 tons of rock were 
excavated; 5,560 cu. yds. of earth were excavated; 300 sq. yds. of roads were re- 
built and 12,410 sq. yds. of road resurfaced; 300 sq. yds. of land were graded; 
underbrush was cleared from 22 acres of land and 4^^^ acres of land were cleared 
for fields. 



14 



P.D. 70 



VALUATION 



November 30, 1931 
Real Estate 

Land, 1,856 acres $41,125.00 

Buildings 1,360,177.53 



$1,401,302.53 

Personal Property 

Travel, transportation and office expenses $300.00 

Food 15,563.05 

Clothing and materials 19,583 .36 

Furnishings and household supplies 226,405.39 

Medical and general care 5,075.45 

Heat, light and power 11,274 .02 

Farm 63,960.90 

Garage, stables and grounds 12,560 . 87 

Repairs 20,941.24 



$375,664.28 

Summary 

Real estate $1,401,302 .53 

Personal property . . 375,664.28 



$1,776,966.81 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1931. 



Cash Account 
Receipts 

Income 

Board of patients $33,140.77 

Personal Services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 156 .65 

Sales: 

Travel, transportation and office expenses $36 . 49 

Food, (board of employees) 2,258.13 

Clothing and materials 220 . 18 

Furnishings and household supplies 20.85 

Medical and general care 31.34 

Farm: 

Cows and calves 75.00 

Pigs and hogs 69 . 44 

Hides . ; 25.85 

Hares 1 . 50 

Milk .60 

Eggs 1 . 00 

Vegetables 1,975.77 

Sundries 3.08 

Repairs, ordinary 74 . 68 

Art and crafts sales 851.59 

Total sales 5,645.70 

Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances 832 . 04 

Rent 631 . 50 

Sundries, post office 61.82 

1,525.36 



Total income 40,468.48 

Maintenance 

Balance from previous year, brought forward $5,630. 73 

Appropriation, current year 475,800.00 



Total $481,430.73 

Expenses (as analyzed below) 448,393 . 72 



Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 33,037.01 

Analysis of Expenses 

Personal services $230,299 .79 

Religious instruction 1,493.25 

Travel, transportation and office expenses . 4,299.25 

Food 55,432.63 

Clothing and materials 14,095 . 42 

Furnishings and household supplies 20,938.54 

Medical and general care 25,335 26 

Heat, light and power 37,132 . 76 

Farm . 32,768.09 

Garage, stable and grounds 5,818.26 

Repairs ordinary 14,532.67 

Repairs and renewals 6,247.80 



Total expenses for Maintenance 



$448,393.72 



P.D. 70 



15 



Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1, 1930 $100,052 .40 

Appropriations for current year 195,550.00 

Total $295,602.40 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $95,406. 55 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 66 . 52 

95,473.07 

Balance November 30, 1931, carried to next year $200,129 33 











Expended 


Total 




Balance 


Object 


Act or 


Whole 




during 


Expended 


at End 




Resolve 


Amount 


Fiscal Year 


to Date 


of Year 


Additional Water Supply 


126-1924 


$42,000 


00 


_ 


$36,911 


86 


$5,088.14 


398-1926 














*Building for Semi-Dist. Men; 


146-1929 


149,900 


00 




149,933 


48 


66.52 


Building for printing 










9,996 


33 


3.67 


Employees' cottage. 










11,999 


11 


89 


Two cottages for officers 


115-1930 


10,000 


00 


$1,283.52 


9,779 


99 


220 ' 01 


Hospital building 


115-1930 


150,000 


00 


67,823.25 


149,395 


25 


604 . 75 


Fire alarm system 


115-1930 


5,000 


00 


3,218.41 


4,834 


20 


165.80 


Cow barn 


115-1930 


10,000 


00 








10,000.00 


Furnishing hospital building . 


245-1931 


9,300 


00 


6,279.42 


6,279 


42 


3,020.58 


Coal trestle .... 


245-1931 


10,000 


00 


39.60 


39 


60 


9,960.40 


Employees' cottage 1931 . 


245-1931 


14,000 


00 








14,000.00 


Additional sewage disposal 


245-1931 


12,250 


00 


909.00 


909 


00 


11,341 00 


New heating plant, equipment 


269-1931 


150,000 


00 


4,275.91 


4,275 


91 


145,724 . 09 






$584,550.00 


$95,406.55 


$384,354 


15 


$200,195.85 



Balance rev-rting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with *) $66 . 52 

Balance carried to next year 200,129.33 

Total as above $200,195 . 8S 

Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been, 1,210.562 (at hospital) 64.719 (family care), 

1,275.281. (Total) 
Total cost of maintenance, $448.393 .72. 
Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $6.7616. 
Receipt from sales, $5,645.70. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.0851. 
All other institution receipts, $34,822.78. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.5251. 
Net weekly per capita $6.1514. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gertrude W. Perry, 

Treasurer. 

STATISTICAL TABLES 
As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 
Table 1. General Information 

Data correct at end of hospital year, November 30, 1931 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State 

3. Hospital plant — Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings $1,401,302 .53 

Personal property 375,664.28 

Total $1,776,966.81 

Total acreage of hospital property owned, 1,856 

Total acreage under cultivation during previous year, 322.25. 

4. Officers and employees: 

Actually in Service at Vacancies at End 

End of Year of Year 



Superintendents 
Assistant physicians 
Clinical assistants. 



M. 


F. 


T. 


1 




1 


6 


1 


7 


7 


1 


8 


1 




1 


1 




1 






1 




10 


10 


63 


58 


121 




5 


5 




2 


2 


55 


41 


96 


128 


117 


245 



M. F. 



Stewards 

Resident dentists 

Pharmacists 

Graduate nurses 

Other nurses and attendants ... 63 58 121 10 1 11 

Occupational therapists 

Social workers 

All other officers and employees 

Total officers and employees .128 117 245 14 2 16 



16 



P.D. 70 



Note: — The following items, 5-10 inclusive, are for the year ended September 30, 1931 
5. Census of patient i>opuIation at end of year: 



White 



Mental defectives. 
All other cases 



Other Races: 
Insane 

Mental defectives. 



Grand Total 



Actually in Hospital 



M. 



Absent from Hosp; 
but Still on Books 



M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


682 


469 


1,151 


39 


93 


132 


28 


16 


44 


4 


5 


9 


2 


2 


4 


3 








487 


1,199 


46 


99 


1-1: 


20 


10 


30 








1 




1 








21 


10 


31 








733 


497 


1,230 


46 


99 


14! 



F. 



6. Patients under treatment Ln occupational-therapy classes, in- 

cluding phj-sical training, on date of report . .15 

7. Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of 

report 533 

8. Average daily number of all patients actually- in hospital during 

year " 714.610 

9. Voluntary patients admitted during year 6 

10. Persons given advice or treatment in out-patient clinics during 

vear 161 



139 
200 



555 . 580 
8 



118 



T. 

154 

733 

,270.: 
14 

279 



Table 2. Financial Statement 
See Treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



P.D. 70 



17 



o 
a. 



5 .'W 



ill 



\0 — — 1 
in 



f<HC O 't fNI 



OC ir, — u-; — — 



I I I ts rM I 



^ — C- in I -t I/: tN rsi ir, O I I lO II 



— 1^— Irfm li^t— llm 



ICC ^ — Lc 



IX— — Tj-CNfSj— O — 



o n 



C w 
O 

03 .ii 



5 = 

III 



C o 



,•0-0 > o- 



2^ > ^ 3 J^-= C3 



c o 

"5 



C CD 

.Sip-- 



•o S £; 



O. 03 S 



18 P.D. 70 



Table 4. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 



Nativity 


Patients 


Parents of Male 
Patients 


Parents of Femaije 
Patients 


JVl. 


_ 


_ 
1 . 


r atners 


Both 
Mothers Parents 


r athers 


Both 
Mothers Parents 


United States 


1 Q 




44 


Q 


10 


9 


1 Q 


17 


16 


Austria .... 
















1 


1 


Canada i . . . . 


O 


1 


D 


4 


4 


4 




2 


1 


Central America 










1 


1 








England .... 


2 


3 


5 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


Finland .... 


4 


3 


7 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


Germany .... 




2 


2 








2 


2 


2 


Greece .... 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 








Ireland .... 


1 


1 


2 


5 


3 


3 




1 




Italy 








2 


2 


2 








Poland 




2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Russia .... 














1 


1 


1 


Sweden .... 




2 


2 








3 


3 


3 


Other countries . 


2 




2 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


Unascertained . 








1 


1 


1 


6 


5 


5 


Total .... 


33 


40 


73 


33 


33 


31 


40 


40 


36 



^Includes Newfoundland. 



P.D. 70 



19 




20 



P.D. 70 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions 



Males Females Total 

Citizens by birth 18 26 44 

Citizens by naturalization 5 1 6 

Aliens 9 8 17 

Citizenship unascertained 1 5 6 



Total 33 40 73 



Table 6. Psychoses of First Admissions 



Psychoses 


M 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T 


1. 


Traumatic psychoses 














2. 


Senile psychoses 








1 


g 


9 


3. 


Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 








4 


5 


9 


4. 


General paralysis 








2 


2 


4 


5. 


Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 














6. 


Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 














7. 


Psychoses with brain tumor 














8. 


Pscyhoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total . 








I 








Meningitis, tubercular or other forms 


i 




1 








9. 


Alcoholic psychoses, total 








5 




5 




Acute hallucinosis 


3 




3 










Other types, acute or chronic 


2 




2 








10. 


Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 














11. 


Psychoses with pellagra 














12. 


Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 








' 2 


g 


10 




Exhaustion delirium 




2 


2 










Cardio-renal diseases ......... 


1 




1 










Other diseases or conditions 


1 


6 


7 








13. 


Manic-depressive psychoses, total 








2 


4 


6 




Manic type 




' l" 


l' 










Depressive type 


1 


1 


2 










Other types 


1 


2 


3 








14. 


Involution melancholia 










2 


2 


15. 


Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 








8 


5 


13 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 










1 


1 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 














18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 














19. 


Psychoses with psychopathic personality 










1 


1 


20. 


Psychoses with mental deficiency 








4 


3 




21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 














22. 


Without psychosis, total 








4 


1 


5 




Psychopathic personality without psychosis .... 


l' 




1 










Mental deficiency without psychosis 


2 


1 


3 










Others 


1 




1 










Total 




33 


40 


73 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 





















With 
























cerebral 


General 




Race 




Total 




Senile 






rterio- 


paralysis 


















sclerosis 












M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 






7 


11 


18 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 5 


1 




1 






4 


3 


7 






















4 


1 


5 
























2 


2 




1 


1 












Greek . 




1 


























4 


2 


6 




1 


1 
















2 


1 


3 


















Lithuanian 




3 


1 


4 


















Scandinavian - 






3 


3 




1 


1 












Scotch . 




1 




1 
























3 


4 






















4 


10 


14 




2 


2 




3 3 


1 


1 


2 




2 


3 


5 




1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


Total 




33 


40 


73 


18 9 


4 


5 9 


2 


2 


4 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified luith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 



Race 



With other 
brain or 
nervous 
diseases 



Alcoholic 



With other 
somatic 



Manic- 
depressive 



English 
Finnish 
French 
German 
Greek 
Irish 
Italian i 
Lithuanian 
Scandinavian 
Scotch 
Slavonic 3 
Mixed 
Race unascertained 

Total 



M. F. T. 

1 - 1 



F. T. 

- 1 

- 2 



M. F. T. 



8 10 



M. F. 

1 
1 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 











Paranoia 


With 














Dementia 


and 


psycho- 


With mental 


Without 










Paranoid 


pathic 












Race 


praecox 


conditions 


personality 


deficiency 


psychoses 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 




1 


2 


3 








1 


1 




1 1 




1 


1 


2 






1 




1 






















1 




















1 


1 






Greek 






1 






















1 






1 




1 






Italian i 


1 




1 
















Lithuanian 




1 


2 






1 




1 


1 


- 1 


Scandinavian 2 .... 














1 


1 






Scotch 


















1 


- 1 


Slavonic^ 




1 


1 


- 1 1 














Mixed 


2 




2 




- 1 1 












Race unascertained 






















Total 


8 


5 


13 


- 1 1 


- 1 1 


4 


3 


7 


4 


1 5 



includes' 'North" and "South". 
^Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

^Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dalmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish, 
Russian, Ruthenian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



22 . P.D. 70 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified idth Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 




Under 
15 years 


15-19 
years 


20-24 
years 






M. 


F. 




T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic 




















2. 


Senile 


1 


8 


9 














3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


4 


5 


9 














4. 




2 


2 


4 














5. 


With cerebral syphilis 




















6. 


With Huntington's chorea 




















7. 


With brain tumor 




















8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 


- 


1 














9. 




5 


- 


5 














10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




















11. 


With pellagra ...... 




















12. 


With other somatic diseases 


2 


8 


10 














13. 


Manic-depressive 


2 


4 


« 














14. 


Involution melancholia .... 


- 


2 


2 














is! 


Dementia praecox 


8 


5 


13 


- - - 


1 - 


1 


2 


2 


4 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 
1 














17. 


Epileptic psychoses 




















18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 




















19. 


With psychopathic personality 




1 


1 














20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


4 


3 


7 




1 


1 


1 




1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses .... 




















22. 




4 


1 


5 
















Total 


33 


40 


73 




2 - 


2 


3 


2 


5 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 







25-29 






30-34 






35-39 






40-44 




45-49 






Psychoses 


years 






years 






years 






years 




years 








M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 




























2. 


Senile 




























3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 
























- 1 


1 


4. 


General paralysis . 




















1 


1 


1 1 


2 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 




























6. 


With Huntington's chorea . 




























7. 


With brain tumor. 




























8. 


With other brain or nervous 






























diseases .... 




























9. 


Aldoholic .... 


















2 




2 


2 - 


2 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exo- 






























genous toxins 




























11. 


With pellagra 




























12. 


With other somatic diseases 








1 


1 










2 


2 


1 1 


2 


13. 


Manic-depressive . 


1 










1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


- 1 


1 


14. 


Involution melancholia 
















1 












15. 


Dementia praecox 


1 1 


2 








1 


1 


2 




1 


1 






16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 






























ditions .... 




























17. 


Epileptic psychoses 




























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 




























19. 


With psychopathic person- 






























ality 




























20. 


With mental deficiency 






1 




1 




2 


2 




1 


1 






21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 




























22. 


Without psychosis 






2 




2 














- 1 


1 




Total .... 


2 1 


3 


3 


1 


4 


2 


5 


7 


2 


6 


8 


4 5 9 



P.D. 70 



23 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Refei^nce to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 









50-54 






55-59 






60-64 






65-69 


70 years 




Psychoses 




years 






years 






years 






years 


and over 





— — 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


R. T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 


























2. 


Senile 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 


- 








3 3 


14 5 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 
















1 


1 






4 3 7 


4. 


General paralysis . 








1 




1 














5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 


























6. 


With Huntington's chorea . 


























7. 


With brain tumor 


























8. 


With other brain or nervous 




























diseases .... 


1 


- 


1 




















9. 


Alcoholic .... 


1 


— 


1 




















10. 


Due to drugs and other exo- 




























genous toxins 


























11. 


With pellagra 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 












1 ] 


13. 


Manic-depressive . 






- 


~" 


1 


1 














14. 


Involution melancholia 
















1 


1 








15. 


Dementia praecox. 


2 




2 








1 




1 






_ _ _ 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 




























ditions .... 




1 


1 




















17. 


Epileptic psychoses 


























18. 


Psy choncurosGS snd ncurosGS 


























19! 


With psychopathic person- 




























ality 
















1 


1 








20. 


With mental deficiency 








1 




1 














21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 


























22. 


Without psychosis 


1 




1 














1 


- 1 






Total .... 


5 


2 


7 


3 


4 


7 


1 


3 


4 


1 


3 4 


5 8 13 



24 



P.D. 70 



5 c 



- 2 



I I I <S fS CM ! 



S 5 
II 



CM I I , 



I C^ I - 



C5 03 



I I I I 
III' 



I I I O O c~'l ' 



3C LT, ^ I I I I I i I X ^ ^1 LT. 



— TtCMI I It^vOI |CM(N|X 



5 ^ t 



o a 



^ > 5 P s o 



P.D. 70 



25 



Table 10. Environment of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 





Psychoses 




Tota 




Urban 


Rural 


— - 


— 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 






















2. 


Senile 


1 


8 


9 










3 


3 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 


5 


9 












2 


4. 




2 


2 


4 




2 




2 






5. 


With cerebral syphilis 




















6. 


With Huntington's chorea 




















7. 


With brain tumor 




















8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


1 


- 


1 


I 




I 








9. 


Alcoholic 


5 




5 


5 




5 








10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 




















11. 


With pellagra 




















12. 


With other somatic diseases 


2 


8 


10 


2 


5 


7 




3 


3 


13. 


Manic-depressive 


2 


4 


6 


2 


^ 


g 








14. 


Involution melancholia ...... 




2 


2 




1 


1 




1 


1 


15. 


Dementia praecox 


8 


5 


13 


8 


4 


12 




1 


1 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 




1 


1 








17. 


Epileptic psychoses 




















18. 






















19. 






1 


1 




1 


1 








20. 




4 


3 


7 


3 


3 


6 


1 




1 


21. 






















22. 




4 


1 


5 


4 


1 


5 










Total 


33 


40 


73 


30 


31 


61 


3 9 12 



Table 11. Economic Condition of First Admissions Classified Reference 
to Principal Psychoses 



























Com 




Unascer- 




Psychoses 




Tota 




Dependent 


Marginal 


fortable 


tained 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic 






























2. 


Senile 


1 


8 


9 


1 


4 






2 


2 




1 


1 




1 1 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


4 


5 


9 


3 




3 


1 


3 


4 










2 2 


4. 


General paralysis .... 


2 


2 


4 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 






5. 


With cerebral syphilis 






























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 






























7. 


With brain tumor .... 






























8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases 


1 




1 








1 




1 












9. 




5 




5 








3 




3 


1 




1 


1 




10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous 
































toxins 






























11. 
































12. 


With other somatic diseases 


2 


8 


10 


1 


2 


3 


1 


5 


6 




1 


1 






13. 


Manic-depressive .... 


2 


4 


6 


2 




2 




2 


2 










2 2 


14. 


Involution melancholia . 




2 


2 










1 


1 




1 


1 






15. 


Dementia praecox .... 


8 


5 


13 


6 


1 


7 


2 


4 


6 












16. 


Paranoid and paranoid conditions. 






1 










1 


1 












17. 


Epileptic psychoses .... 






























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 






























19. 


With psychopathic personality 




1 


1 










1 


1 












20. 


With mental deficiency . 


4 


3 


7 


2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 




1 1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . 






























22. 


Without psychosis .... 


4 


1 


5 




1 


1 


4 




4 














Total 


33 


40 


73 


16 


9 


25 


13 


21 


34 


3 


4 


7 


1 


6 7 




26 



P.D. 70 



Table 12. Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified iviih Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Tota 




Abstinent 


Temperate 


Intemperate 






M. 


p. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic 








- 


— 


— 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ _ 


2. 




1 


8 


9 


1 


8 


9 












i. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 






y 


3 


5 


8 


_ 




_ 


1 


1 


4. 


General paralysis 


2 


2 


4 


_ 


2 


2 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis 
























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 
























7. 


























8.' 


With other brain or nervous diseases . 


1 




1 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ _ 


g. 






















5 


- 5 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 
























1 1. 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases 


2 


8 


10 


1 




8 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive 


2 







2 


4 


6 












14. 


Involution melancholia .... 




2 


2 




1 


1 




1 


1 






15. 


Dementia praecox 


8 


5 


13 


7 


3 


10 


1 


1 


2 




1 1 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 




1 


1 












17. 


























18. 


Psj choneuroses and neuroses . 
























19. 


With psychopathic personality 




1 


1 
















1 1 


20. 


With mental dencienc\- .... 


■i 


3 




2 


3 


5 


2 




2 






21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses .... 
























22. 


Without psychosis 


4 


1 


5 




1 


1 


2 




2 


2 


- 2 




Total 


33 


40 


73 


16 


35 


51 


8 


2 


10 


9 


3 12 



28 



P.D. 70 



Table 14. Psychoses of Readmissions 

Psychoses Males Females Total 

1. Traumatic - - 

2. Senile psychoses - 1 1 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 

4. General paralysis - 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis . - - - 

6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea - 

7. Psychoses with brain tumor - - - 

8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases - - - 



9. Alcoholic psychoses . ; 1 - 1 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins ] - - - 

11. Psychoses with pellagra - - - 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases 

13. Manic-depressive psychoses ..,1 5 6 

14. Involution melancholia v . . ; 1 1 2 

15. Dementia praecox 1 1 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions ;1 - 1 

17. Epileptic psychoses - - - 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses - 1 1 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality 1 - 1 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency 2 - 2 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses - - - 

22. Without psychosis - 

Total 7 9 16 



Table 15. Discharges of Patients Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 

and Condition on Discharge 



Psychoses 




Total 




Recovered 


Improved 


Unimproved 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


























2. 




1 




1 








1 




1 






3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




1 


1 










1 


1 






4. 






1 


1 










1 


1 






5. 


With cerebral syphilis 
























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 
























7. 


With brain tumor 
























8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases . 
























9. 


Alcoholic 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 






10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 
























11. 


With pellagra 
























12. 


With other somatic diseases 


1 


2 


3 










2 


2 


1 


1 


13. 




3 


3 


6 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 






14. 


Involution melancholia .... 




2 


2 










2 


2 






15. 




5 


2 


7 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 4 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 
























17. 


























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 




1 


1 




1 


1 












19. 


With psychopathic personality 


1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 






20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


1 


3 


4 








1 


1 


2 




2 2 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . . 
























22. 




2 


1 


3 






















16 


17 


33 


3 


2 


5 


7 


11 


18 


4 3 7 



P.D. 70 



29 



= C3 
a; u 



x: i2 ° 2 



00 « ir: (N X « 



is- 



CO O 



.1 s 

H ^'o a 

*j O >> rt'— 

" Is II 



T3 

tl 95 

.22 



C 03 



.S CO ^ 



•2° 

•< CO 

.2 O 

(u.i: 



30 



P.D. 70 



'All other 
psychoses 








fC— 1 1 1 1 








1 - 


- 1 1 
• 

. . . 


I 1(11 

1 - 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 

III, 








^ 1 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 . 1 




G O 


















1 1 


, , , 


fN 1 1 1 1 1 


.1.1 




.tl I' 














moia 

[id 

moid 
itions 




, , 


1 1 1 
1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 


.III 

III! 


- 


Par? 

ai 
par:) 
cond 


:^ 


1 1 




1 ^ 1 1 I 1 






jmentia 
raecox 




^ 1 


rn (N 1 

^ - 1 


ro 1 1 — 1 


- 1 
1 - - 1 


12 21 






1 


CS — 1 








ition 
:holia 


H 






II CN 1 1 1 


II 1 1 




Involi 
melanc 








II (N 1 1 1 


II 1 1 





CD 2 



2 



S §o S 

O g CO 



II 



-2 ^ 



c £ 

ii 



c S 3 



P.D. 70 



31 



Tabll 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Tola 




20—24 
years 


25—29 
years 


30-34 
years 


35-39 
years 


40-44 
years 






Al. 


„ 
r . 


_ 
1 . 


A r TT T 

ivl . r . 1 . 


JVl . r . 1 . 


- „ _ 
-Nl . r . 1 . 


. _ _ 
. a1 r . 1 . 


aI . r . 1 . 


1. 


Xrciuiiititic 


















2. 






J. 


_ 












3. 


W'itli cercbftil arteriosclerosis . 


3 


3 














4_ 


General paraivsis 


3 




3 












5! 


With cerebral syphilis 


















6. 


With Huntington s chorea 




















With brain tumor . 


















8. 


With other brain or nervous 




















diseases .... 


1 




1 












9. 


Alcoholic 






3 










2-2 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exoge- 




















nous toxins .... 


















11. 


With pellagra .... 


















12. 


With other somatic diseases . 




2 












J 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive 




2 


2 












14. 


Involution melancholia . 




3 


3 












15. 


Dementia praecox . 


9 


12 


21 


1 - 1 


- 1 1 


_ _ _ 


2-2 


1 I 2 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid condi- 






















1 


- 


1 












17. 


Epileptic psychoses. 


















18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses. 


















19. 


With psychopathic personality 


















20. 


With mental deficiency . 


2 


2 


4 












21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . 


















22. 


Without psychosis . 


1 


1 


2 














Total 


25 


31 


56 


1 - 1 


- 1 1 




2-2 


3 3 6 



T.\BLE 17. Age of Patients at Time of Death Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses — Concluded 







45-49 


50-54 




55-50 


60-64 


65-69 


70 years 




Psychoses 


years 


years 




years 




years 


years 


and over 






M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M 


. F. 


T. 


M.F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic 
























2. 


Senile 






: 












- 1 1 


2 


4 6 




With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




















3 


3 6 




General paralysis. 




1 - 1 












1 




1 


1 




With cerebral syphilis. 




- 1 1 




















6. 


With Huntington's chorea . 


























With brain tumor 
























8. 


With other brain or nervous dis- 






























1 - 1 




















9. 


Alcoholic 






1 




1 














10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous 


























toxins 
























11. 


With pellagra .... 
























12. 


With other somatic diseases 














1 


1 








13. 


Manic-depressive. 














1 


1 






1 I 


14. 


Involution melancholia 








1 


1 












I 1 


15. 


Dementia praecox 


-22 


- 1 1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


1 1 2 


1 


2 3 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 






1 




1 














17. 


Epileptic psychoses 
























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 
























19. 


With psychopathic personality. 
























20. 


With mental deficiency 


- 1 1 


1 - 1 


1 






- 










1 1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 
























22. 


Without psychosis 








1 


1 


1 




1 












-33 




3 2 5 


— 


4 






4 


8 


1 2 3 


7 


12 19 



o 



(N CN — -H 



.2 5: s o c 



c 
o 

u 

■•o 



2S 



5^ y 

5 is m (b M O 



i3 S 
c. o 



^ (N \d ^~ M O O «N "I O « 0>- C 



i 

P.D. 70 



33 



0} u 

nJ > 

a o 



o 2 



3 

O ai 
".=0 ' O 



03 (fl Cfl C 

o G <y y 
■t-i u :3 a 
ri CJ rs T' b 

C O (J hU J3 o 



O X 



p c 
i: o 

OT "i; tL> in o 
>> c ot:'o >> 



^ fS Tj< lO I 



34 



P.D. 70 



Table 19. Family Care Department 



Male Female Tot; 

Remaining in Family Care. October I. 1930 9 57 66 

On visit from Family Care, October 1, 1930 I - 1 

Admitted during the year 4 43 47 

Whole number of cases within the year 14 100 114 

Dismissed within the > ear: 

Returned to institution 8 36 44 

Returned to institution while on visit from Family Care ... 1 - 1 

Discharged (died) - - - 

On visit - - - 

Remaining in Family Care. September 30. 1931 5 64 69 

Supported by State 4 64 68 

Private - - - 

Self-supporting 1 - 1 

Number of different persons within the year 9 42 51 

Number of different persons within the year dismissed .... 8 29 37 

Number of different persons within the year admitted 4 35 39 

Average daily number in Family Care during the vear: 

Supported by State 4.432 57.506 61.9, 

Private - - - 

Self-supporting 1.000 1.632 2.6- 



Public Document 



No. 70 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony 

FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 
1932 

Department of Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
500 — 4 -'33. Order 8203. 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE COLONY 



GARDNER STATE COLONY 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.-D., Chairman, Boston. 
Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Secretary, Worcester. 
Owen A. Hob an, Gardner. 
George A. Marshall, Fitchburg. 
Miss Grace Nichols, Boston. 
Richard T. Fisher, Weston. 
Frederick N. Dillon, Fitchburg. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
Henry L. Clow, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Senior Assistant Physician. 
Harold K. Marshall, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mart Danfortk, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Nathan C. Robey, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Lee W. Darrah, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. Marr, Steward. 
Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Friberg, Social Worker. 

Mary Anne Chisholm, R.N., Principal of the School of Nursing. 

DIRECTORS IN INDUSTRIES 

Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
Newton E. Smallwood, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Henry L. Nielson, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
Anthony P. Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Elof R. Teir, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS 
Viola Farnham, G.N., Women's Infirmary. 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, G.N., Women's Hospital Building. 
M. Josephine Shcptt, C-.N.. Men's Hospital Building. 
Elvira I. Winchi^nbach, G.N., Woven's Treatment Building. 
MoNA Bishop, G.N., Men\ Treatment Building. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES 
Rev. James T. Reilly, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant 



TRUSTEES' REPORT 
T His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees have the honor to present herewith the thirtieth annual report 
of the Gardner State Colony. 

On February 24, 1932 Major Thomas H. Shea died. He was first appointed to 
this Board in 1915. The following resolutions were passed at the time of his death: 

" The Trustees of the Gardner State Colony note with sorrow the passing 
from this life on the twenty-fourth day of February, nineteen hundred and 
thirty-two, of one of their associates, Major Thomas H. Shea of Fitchburg. 

His official connection with the Gardner State Colony began in February, 
1915, and continued to his death, covering in all a period of seventeen 
years. During that time the institution passed through the most im- 
portant stages of its development. 



I 



P.D. 70 3 

With a wide and varied experience in human relations, accustomed to 
the details of business transactions of major dimensions, he brought to 
the service of the Commonwealth a breadth of vision, soundness of judg- 
ment and wisdom in counsel which enabled him to contribute in a large 
way to the successive changes in policy which enlarged the scope of the 
work of the Gardner State Colony and made it a significant unit in the 
Commonwealth's system for the care of the mentally ill. 

Of his labors in behalf of the Gardner State Colony, of his interest in its 
progress, of his delight in its growth, of his sorrow at its defeats, of his 
constant and vigilant watchfulness over it, of his sympathetic human 
understanding, of his patience with the shortcomings of others, of the 
rectitude of his life, of his earnestness and fidelity in the preformance of 
his public duties, we are both mindful and grateful, and order this brief 
record of his services to the Commonwealth and our personal apprecia- 
tion of him as an associate spread on the records of the Trustees of the 
Gardner State Colony as a memorial to him who was one of its truest 
friends." 

Mr. Frederick N. Dillon of Fitchburg was appointed a Trustee to serve Major 
Shea's unexpired term. 

Attention is invited to the excellent report of the Superintendent. The Board 
endorses the list of needs of the Colony contained in this report. The Board does 
not, however, feel that it wishes in this year of exceptional diflficulty to urge the 
immediate appropriation of money for any of this work. During the year 1932 
a very considerable amount of special work has been done under appropriations , 
made in 1931. A list of this work is contained in the report of the Superintendent. 
When it is again possible for the Commonwealth to appropriate money for develop- 
mex^t of the State institutions it seems to this Board important that very careful 
consideration should be given to the question of returning to the Colony principle 
for which this institution was first built. The policy of the last few years has led 
away from that principle. In the minds of the Trustees it is the correct one. A 
great deal can be done in the building and developing of colonies by the labor 
of patients. It is the opinion of the Board that this is a wise and economical pro- 
cedure. 

The increase in numbers of the insane, the feeble-minded, raises in acute form the 
question of what must be done to alter this trend. Your Trustees do not propose 
in this report to go into the long story of the proof of the transmittal of these diffi- 
culties from one generation to another. There can be no doubt about the large 
part taken by heredity. The menace to the future of our race, the burden on the 
state, the suffering of the afflicted individual and his family all call upon us to stop 
the policy of drift and take action to control the propagation of inferior and vicious 
strains of the human race. Will we have the courage to do this before it is too late? 

Respectfully submitted, 
Amie H. Coes Richard T. Fisher 

Grace Nichols Owen A. Hoban 

George A. Marshall Fred N. Dillon 

Frederick A. Washburn Trustees. 
January 18, 1933. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

Herewith is respectfully submitted my annual report as superintendent of the 
Gardner State Colony. All matters relating to finance are for the year ending 
November 30, 1932; all matters relating to patients are for the hospital year 
ending September 30, 1932. 

Movement of Population 
At the beginning of the year, September 30, 1931, there were 1,375 patients on 
record on the books of the institution. Of these there were 1,230 in actual residence 
and 145 were on visit or otherwise absent. At the beginning of the year there were 
69 patients cared for in families under supervision and this number has been 



4 



P.D. 70 



increased to 78 at the end of the year. During the year 252 patients have been re- 
ceived; 117 of these were received by direct admission and 135 by transfer from 
other hospitals to relieve overcrowding. Of the 117 direct admissions, 95 were 
admitted for the first time to any hospital. There were 22 who had had previous 
hospital residence. Compared with 252 patients admitted, 152 were discharged or 
died. Of these 81 were discharged and 71 have been removed by death. 

There remained on our books at the end of the year, September 30, 1932, 1,475 
patients. Of these 1,327 were in actual residence and 148 were on parole or other- 
wise absent. Compared with the previous year, 1931, there have been 100 more 
under care during the year and at the end of the year an increase of 97 resident 
and three non-resident. There are under care at this hospital 280 patients more 
than during the same period three years ago which increase is due to additional 
facilities. 

An analysis of the form of mental disease occurring in those 95 admitted for the 
first time to any hospital shows that 12.6% were diagnosed as manic-depressive 
psychoses; 11% dementia praecox; 10.5% senile psychoses; psychoses with 
cerebral arteriosclerosis 9.5%; without psychoses 9.3%; psychoses with mental 
deficiency 8.3%; neuroses 8.3%; alcoholic psychoses 7.3%; psychoses with. 
somatic diseases 5.2%; paranoid conditions 2.1%; general paralysis 4%. As 
noted in my last report, the largest number of admissions was due to age and 
arterial changes, which combined accounted for 20% of the admissions, compared 
with 19% the previous year. An analysis of all psychoses in the 95 first admissions 
compared with the previous year shows fewer admitted with general paralysis; a 
similar number diagnosed as dementia praecox; fewer diagnosed as psychoses with 
other somatic diseases an increase in manic-depressive psychoses; a decrease in 
neuroses. 

9.3% of the 95 admitted for the first time diagnosed without psychoses: 7 were 
mentally deficient, 1 a drug addict, 1 without psychosis. 

It is noteworthy that this year when we received 95 first admissions and in the 
previous year, 97, that there is but little difference in the types received and the 
diagnosis made. We are frequently asked what difference has been noted in the 
number admitted during this period of so-called depression. No difference of note 
is apparent. While there has been an increase in the number of manic-depressive 
psychoses admitted, the reasons assigned for the mental illness have not been 
directly attributable to the business situation over that of one year ago. Possibly 
in a fev/ cases depression has been more marked and is more difficult to overcome 
than during the previous year. Discouragement seems to be more deep seated 
and the ability to fight to make a come back much less. 

The principle assigned causes of mental illness in the 95 first admissions were as 
follows: senility and arteriosclerosis 19; poor mental endowment 23; somatic 
disease 5; alcohol 7; mental deficiency 8; syphilis 4. Of all first admissions 23.1% 
were discharged within the same hospital year. 

There were 71 deaths: 36.6% were over 70 years of age; 52.1% were between 
50 and 70 years of age, and only 11.2% were under 50 years of age. 

The principle causes of death were: cardio-vascular disease 50.7%; tuberculosis 
5.6%; carcinoma 15.6% and syphiHs 5.6%. 

Of the first admissions 31% were of foreign birth; 69% were born in the United 
State; 72% were of parents, one or both of whom were born abroad; in 28% the 
parents were born in the United States. 

Extra Mural Activities 

With the establishment of a traveling clinic composed of a psychiatrist, psycho- 
logist, psychiatric social worker and clerk, much work has been done in the com- 
munity in towns and cities, adjacent to the Colony. These clinics include: an 
adult out-patient clinic; a school clinic; a child guidance and a habit clinic as well 
as the examination of problem cases of the Juvenile Court. 

In the out-patient and consultation clinic for adults 45 cases have been studied. 
In this clinic are seen all cases that are referred by a social agency, a physician, by 
the court or for personal examination. These examinations are conducted not 
only at the established clinic but in other hospitals and at the home of patients. 



P.D. 70 



5 



In the school clinic 261 children were studied. This clinic is intended to aid 
superintendents of schools in the studying of children who are retarded in their 
studies. All of those three years retarded must be studied and other may be re- 
ferred at the discretion of the school superintendent. It appears that there are still 
some school superintendents who are not as yet availing themselves of the facilities 
of the clinic. 

In the child guidance clinic, problem and habit cases are chiefly studied. There 
were 101 new cases studied this year. The work of this child guidance clinic 
should, and we believe already does, demonstrate its value in providing better ad- 
justment, correction of habits and perhaps most important of all in improving the 
understanding of the parents and their obligations to the child. The aim is to 
study and improve the habits which are frequently the reasons for bringing the 
child for study. 

Thirty-four children have been presented for study and report to the Juvenile 
Court for the purpose of examining and to determine whether the mental condition 
is the cause of delinquency, whether institutional care is indicated, or whether 
other adjustments may be made that will prevent further delinquency. 

All cases presented in the out-patient clinic that present special problems are 
referred to the entire hospital staff for review. All of this out-patient work seems 
to be greatly desired by the communities we serve. An increasing interest is being 
shown. One indication of this is the fact that the members of the out-patient 
staff have by invitation given 27 talks on "Better Mental Health" during the 
past year. 

If any improvement in the nervous and mental health of the next generation 
is to be made, if delinquency is to be reduced, if citizens in general are to give 
greater consideration to mental health as indeed they must or bear a still greater 
burden than at present, then the work which is being done in the community is 
decidedly worth while and worthy of every support. A certain amount of general 
education may be carried on from the hospital by its staff members, but this can 
be done only to a limited extent. Real progress must be made thru educational 
methods carried on in the community itself by trained workers. The importance 
of this work has been demonstrated and accepted. The need of it is great. The 
work itself is bound to grow rapidly. 

General Medical 

There have been no changes on the medical staff during the year. The consulting 
staff has actively cooperated during the year and we are indebted to Dr. A. F. 
Lowell, Gardner, Surgeon; Dr. H. D. Bone, Gardner, Ophthalmologist; Dr. G. A. 
Mossman, Gardner, Orthopedic Surgeon; Dr. C. H. Jennings, Fitchburg, Roen- 
tgenologist for their services. 

Considerable surgical work occurs during the year in a population such as this 
and these physicians have most fully cooperated and given their time and the 
value of their experience in their specialties. 

The following meetings and gatherings have been held at the Colony during the 
year: Worcester North District Medical Society, October 25; Students from the 
Fitchburg Normal School, July 27; Wachusett Dental Society, November 2; Dis- 
trict Branch of the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene, December 14. In 
addition to these we have received a number of groups from other hospitals, for 
instruction in special methods of treatment. Members of the staff assisted in 
giving a course in mental hygiene in Orange in cooperation with the State Depart- 
ment of Education and the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene. 

Treatment 

Our population rather naturally divides itself into three groups: 1. A rather 
large group of those in which the duration of mental disease has been considerable 
and with but little prospect of permanent recovery in the light of our present 
knowledge of mental diseases and who require not only ordinary medical care but 
whose daily lives require supervision and direction. In this group there is com- 
paratively little hope of recovery. Re-adjustment thru occupation, productive if 
possible, is th^ chief method employed. 



6 



P.D. 70 



2. A group of those who because of bodily illness or advanced age require strictly 
hospital care. In this group the chief requirement is medical supervision and 
nursing. This group is an ever enlarging one. The average number confined to 
bed this year has been 71. 

3. Those in whom the onset of mental disease has been of comparatively recent 
origin and in whom intensive treatment is carried out with the view of correcting 
physical conditions that may exist and to bring about a re-establishment of mental 
faculties. 

Our greatest eHort this year has been in the study and treatment of this last 
group. We constantly stress the need of individual treatment, the need of special 
study of every individual as an individual rather than one of a group. In these so 
called recent cases a personal interest is taken in each case. Confidence is instilled 
in them so that their cooperation may be obtained and held. They must be made 
to feel that the doctors and nurses have a keen interest in their illness. They 
must be made to feel that every effort is being made to assist them in their re- 
covery. I firmly believe that if the confidence of the patient can be obtained early 
during hospital residence as well as the confidence of relatives and friends that it 
is of material assistance to those who come to us for treatment and to us who are 
endeavoring to give that treatment. 

Every effort is made to determine, if possible, any physical basis which may 
account for the mental upset and if found it is corrected. Full use is made of the 
laboratory facilities, dental facilities, x-ray, etc., etc. Each year sees an increasing 
use of those facilities which are so important in general hospitals. 

Each year sees a further development in our facilities for special treatment and 
the use of them. Some of the most common forms of special treatment in use are: 

Occupational Therapy: This is organized to provide varied occupation to suit 
the individual need of the patient and extends from so-called bedside occupation 
available to those who are incapacitated and confined to the bed or convalescent, 
to those who are able to attend classes held in the various buildings or to go to the 
Occupational Therapy Building where special instruction is given. 

The various activities of the Colony are divided into: 1. Occupational therapy. 
2. Industrial therapy. 3. Necessary hospital occupation. 

1. Strictly occupational therapy is any class work, activity or occupation pre- 
scribed by the physician for its re-adjustment value. It is a means to an end not 
the end itself. It is adapted to the patients' needs from the acute stage of the 
existing disease to the time when a patient may be mentally or physically re- 
adjusted to a daily normal activity. 

2. It is at a later stage that we make every effort to prescribe normal activities 
which then places the patient in the industrial therapy group in which creative 
interest is encouraged and productive energy utilized. As I have frequently stated, 
it seems to us to be the most common sense method to, as soon as possible, graduate 
patients from strictly occupational therapy into interesting and productive occu- 
pations. To make this possible we have many industrial therapeutic departments 
where it is possible to occupy and engage the attention of the larger number of 
our patients. 

3. Necessary hospital activities. These acitvities actually cover every depart- 
ment of the institution from the wards to the dining-rooms, kitchen, farm, etc. 
In this group are employed those who because of continuing mental disease and in 
whom the prospect of recovery through intensive medical treatment is somewhat 
remote. 

While we divide our occupational therapy service into three major groups, they 
naturally merge one into another and become a part of the whole system of occu- 
pation as a therapeutic measure but not in the narrow sense used in speaking of 
occupational therapy. In the placing of all patients whether in the simplest occu- 
pational therapy or producing vegetables on the farm it is all under the direction 
of the attending physician. The daily average number engaged in occupational 
therapy or useful occupation during the year has been 75% of the women, 82% 
of the men. We consider as occupied only those who are occupied at least two hours 
per day. 



P.D. 70 



7 



During the year 19,352 articles of clothing were made by women and 14,231 
articles other than clothing such as household articles were manufactured. 

Textile Department: On the looms are made the greater portion of our cloth 
for clothing, sheets, towels, blankets and bedspreads. The total amount of cloth 
woven during the year was 27,453 yards. All brooms, brushes, pillows, mattresses, 
stockings, rubber door mats, etc., are made in this department. 

Shoe Shop. Here are manufactured all new shoes. There have been 808 pairs of 
shoes made and 2,183 pairs repaired. It is of note that for the past 24 years all 
shoes have been manufactured and none purchased. 

Tailor Shop: The entire upper floor of the Men's Industrial Building has been 
remodelled and is now devoted to the manufacture of clothing for both men and 
women. In order to diversify the activities of the women's department many 
garments are cut out here but are made by the women in other departments. The 
major portion of the manufacturing is conducted in this department which is now 
well equipped. There have been 10,674 pieces of cloth cut out from which 1,762 
articles of clothing have been made and 4,039 articles have been repaired and 
pressed. 

Provision for the mending of all clothing is made in each building where patients 
live except in the case of the mending for men which is done at each of the women's 
colonies for an assigned colony of men. 

Furniture Shop: In this department all new furniture is manufactured and all 
furniture kept in repair. There were 249 pieces of new furniture made during the 
year and 6,447 pieces repaired. 

Printing Department: This department is operated for the Department of Mental 
Diseases and does all printing of forms, reports and pamphlets required by the 
various hospitals as well as the Department. Perhaps the best way to show the 
amount of work done in this department is to state that five tons of metal type 
has been used and 42,664 pounds of printed matter delivered. Institution payroll 
checks are now printed here. Five million impressions were made and the printing 
of all forms from a small report card to a 378 page annual report. 

Cannery: Here have been employed during the summer and fall months, groups 
of women many of whom are from the Treatment Building and who cannot be 
satisfactorily employed in many of the indoor activities but who enjoy work at the 
cannery and benefit materially in the preparation, largely out of doors, of vegetables 
and fruit for winter use. There were 32,295 cans of vegetables and fruit preserved 
and delivered to the store from the cannery. 

Hydrotherapy 

This is largely carried on in the Men's and Women's Treatment Buildings where 
special equipment is provided. Each building has seven continuous bath tubs, a 
tonic treatment room, a pack application room and pack rest room and two colonic 
irrigation rooms. During the year 3,620 continuous bath treatments have been 
given. This form of treatment we consider most important. 

Colonic Irrigation: This form of treatment was instituted in May 1930. Over 
10,000 colonic irrigations have been given, each requiring approximately 45 
minutes. We believe that internal hydrotherapy as well as external is indicated 
in a considerable number of cases and feel that it merits the same attention. It is, 
of course, difficult in most forms of treatment to claim that treatment and that 
alone has produced the physical or mental change noted, but we have noted in 
those cases suffering from manic depressive conditions there has been a quicker 
return to normal mentality if the colon is kept well irrigated. This we believe is 
due to the removal of toxic products from the colon, a relief to the dehydrated con- 
dition to the tissues and a relief from acidosis. Our most marked depressive cases 
are constipated and dehydrated especially upon admission to the hospital. Re- 
sults have not been outstanding in cases of dementia praecox, that is, from a psy- 
chiatric standpoint. 

In dementia praecox, physical improvement has been noticed and because the 
colon is not permitted to becom.e conjested, many are less objectionable in their 
habits. They are certainly quieter and cleaner following this form of treatment. 
From the standpoint of the hospital, it has been interesting to note that there has 



8 



P.D. 70 



been a marked lessening of destruction of clothing, sheets and mattresses. From 
our experience this form of treatment tends to produce a quicker return to mental 
stability in favorable cases. In active cases sedation is unquestionably obtained. 

Wet Sheet Envelopment. This form of treatment has limited application and where 
indicated has been used. We beheve the number of wet sheet "packs" should not 
be large and our experience has been that the hydrotherapeutic baths and colonic 
irrigations have reduced them to a minimum. The benefits that may be expected 
through hydrotherapeutic measures whether baths, packs, or irrigations, are 
pretty largely dependent upon the interest the physician may have in the selection 
of suitable cases for treatment and his interest in following them up and he must 
have the intelligent and active support of his nurses and hydrotherapists. Success 
or failure it seems to me depends somewhat upon this interest and study of each 
case. 

Nursing Service 

The two year course in psychiatric nursing for attendants has been continued. 
In the senior class nine pupils were enrolled at the beginning of the year, eight 
successfully completed the course and passed the examination. In the junior 
class twelve successfully passed the examinations. There have been fewer changes 
in the nursing force in general this past year than in previous years owing to the 
general industrial situation. Because of the need of operating as economically as 
possible a number of vacancies were left unfilled and many leaves of absence with- 
out pay were granted. This, of course, reduced the force to a point below which it 
is not wise to go if a satisfactory standard of service is expected. 

Several lectures were given to groups of physicians and nurses from other hospitals 
in the technique and value of colonic irrigation. 

Diversion 

An R C A talking picture equipment was installed in April and during the fall 
and winter months motion picture entertainments have been given each week. 
This seems to be the form of entertainment that our patients as well as the com- 
munity at large seem to enjoy. 

All special holidays have been appropriately observed. On Memorial Day a 
special program was arranged with Captain J. Robert O'Brien of the Constitutional 
Educational League of New York, speaker of the day. 

A concert by the Nevins Glee Club of Gardner was enjoyed on May 4. A Min- 
strel Show was given by the American Legion Minstrels of Ashburnham, April 
14. The Annual Field Day was held October 12. Dances have been held at in- 
tervals and dances of a special nature with special music and refreshments on all 
holidays. At dances music is furnished by the Colony Band of fifteen pieces. 

The occupational therapy classes have assisted much in interior decorating and in 
making special decorations for the Assembly Hall. 

Much effort has been expended in making our church services attractive and the 
attendance encouraged by special music arranged for the choir for both morning 
and afternoon services. Many officers of the colony have contributed generously 
of their time to provide music for these services of a high order. These services 
have, I know, been much appreciated. 

Dental Department 
Both the Dentist and Dental Nurse devote their entire time to the care of the 
teeth and mouths of the patients and have done considerable bacteriological work 
particularly as to the cause of Vincent's infection and in the treatment of the same. 
The work accomplished in this department is shown in the following tables: 



Examinations 2,577 

Prophylaxes 1,215 

Fillings 201 

Root canal treatment 82 

Extractions 450 

Oral surgical operations 163 

Abscesses 77 

Corrected occlusions 12 

Root resections 13 



P.D. 70 9 

Surgical treatment of: 

Pyorrhea 4 

Fractures 2 

Impactions 25 

Alveolectomies 5 

Cysts 10 

Post operative treatments 663 

Special treatment for pyorrhea 500 

Special treatment for Vincent's angina 207 

Other pathological conditions 200 

Plates made 28 

Plates adjusted 66 

Plates repaired 45 

Plates polished 1 

Bridges removed 6 

X-rays taken 116 

Microscopic smears taken 1,100 

The bacteriological findings in these examinations have proved of great value in 
the matter of treatment and this is now a matter of routine. A smear is taken of 
each patient, presented at the clinic, and the findings made a matter of record. 
The elimination of all sources of infection in the mentally aflElicted is considered 
of great importance. Further work in this field in relation to infection of other parts 
of the body merits intensive research. 

Maintenance 

There was appropriated for general maintenance purposes $463,712.34 including 
liabilities amounting to $17,562.34 brought forward from 19,31. There has been 
expended $425,336.56. Liabilities of $11,239.13 are to be carried forward to the 
1933 appropriation which leaves an unexpended balance reverting to the State 
Treasury of $24,307.55. The per capita weekly cost based on purchases was $6.08 
compared with $6.76 of last year, or a ten percent decrease. The per capita cost 
on the maintenance basis which includes farm products, etc., is $7.07 against $7.89 



of the previous year or a reduction of 10.03 Vc^ 



The budget estimate for 1933 is as follows: 



Personal services $234,000 

Travel, transportation, etc 3,920 

Food 53,105 

Clothing and materials 11,100 

Religious instruction 1,900 

Furnishings and household supplies 15,500 

Medical and general care 25,000 

Heat and other operating supplies 45,200 

Farm 24,600 

Garage and grounds 3,350 

Repairs ordinary 11,000 

Repairs and renewals 2,325 



Total $431,000 

Budget figures as prepared and presented must contain all probable expendi- 
tures for the ensuing year. Further study of this and the entire State budget will 
undoubtedly make reductions necessary. Whatever appropriation is finally 
thought necessary we will keep within, barring unforeseen emergencies. It will 
be my aim, however, to maintain the present standard of the nursing service. The 
standard of this service should be raised and for any reason it would be unfortunate 
to reduce it. 

Special Appropriations 
1. An appropriation of $10,000 for the construction of a cow barn was granted 
in 1930. The plans for this were drawn but the details of construction apparently 
could not be agreed upon. The money appropriated has been allowed to revert to 
the State Treasury. 



10 



P.D. 70 



2. New central heating plant. An appropriation of $150,000 was made. Con- 
struction was done under contract and was begun November 20, 1930. This was 
completed and in operation in October 1932. 

3. The sum of $10,000 was appropriated for the construction of a coal trestle. 
This in reality is part of the new heating plant development. Construction was 
done under contract and was completed in August 1932. 

4. Employees' Cottage. An appropriation of $14,000 was made available for the 
construction of an additional employees cottage. This cottage has been erected 
without a general contract, is now being plastered and will be ready for occupancy 
by April, 1933. 

5. Sewage disposal. An appropriation of $12,850 was made available for addi- 
tional sewer beds at the Westminster Cottages and a new filtration plant at the 
rear of the Highland Cottage. The plant at the Westminster Cottages consists 
of necessary sludge tanks and five filtration beds. It was constructed by our 
own labor and is in operation. 

The construction of the filtration plant at the Highland Cottage is now under- 
way. The open winter thus far has permitted us to continue this construction and 
at the present time five of seven beds have been built. When completed, about one 
mile of six inch tile will be laid connecting nine buildings. This system should be 
in operation by May first. 

6. Furnishings — Hospital Building. A sum of $9,300 was made available for 
furnishing the last 86 bed treatment building for men which has been completed. 
The installation of a tonic bath equipment recently ordered will complete the 
equipment for this building. . 

Repairs not Re-curring Annually 

1. Coal trestle repairs. Only necessary repairs have been made on the original 
coal trestle as it will be abandoned. A new coal trestle has been erected at the site 
of the new heating plant. 

2. Poles. A sum of $300 was appropraited for the purchase of electric light and 
telephone poles. These have been purchased, delivered and erected where re- 
quired. 

3. Re-building road. This road, from the main highway to the garage and shops, 
was constructed by our own labor and is 850 feet in length and 16 feet in width, 
1,904 square yards. It has a stone base and asphalt surface. 

4. Extension of fire alarm system. The system has been extended to include 
a station at the Ash and Locust Cottages and another centrally located to care 
for the hospital and treatment buildings. This system installed during the past 
three years gives us a reasonably adequate fire alarm system. The control appartus 
and whistle are now located at the abandoned heating plant and should be re- 
located at the new heating plant building. 

5. Transformers — Dairy Barn. The sum of $325 was available for changing 
the 110 volt electric system used at the dairy building and barn to 220 volt. This 
work has been done. 

6. There was appropriated for additional transformers to care for buildings 
erected in the past three years $828. The transformers have been purchased but 
owing to radical changes in the electrical system which will now be made and to 
the re-location of the new heating plant, they have not been installed. 

7. Changes in hospital buildings. A sum of $1,057 was made available for 
changes which are now underway as follows: At the Men's Hospital a diet kitchen 
has been installed; a dumb waiter installed from this kitchen to the two floors 
above; a barber shop and linen room are now provided in this building. The 
equipment for the giving of tonic baths has been removed from the Women's 
Hospital to the Women's Treatment Building and is in use. The room in the 
Women's Hospital Building formerly used for tonic bath treatment has been made 
into an enlarged dental room with waiting room and laboratory. The former dental 
room will be made into a room for the care of laundry for this building. An equipped 
storage room has been added to the pharmacy. Serving rooms have been arranged 
on each floor of the Men's Hospital and linen rooms on each floor provided. This 
work has been done by our own labor. 



P.D. 70 11 

In the maintenance request for 1933 appropriations three renewal items have 
received favorable consideration as follows: 

1. Re-building road to hospital building: This is a continuation of the main 
road from a point near the office to and including the two hospital buildings and 
two treatment buildings. 

2. Painting standpipe: This steel tank with a capacity of 295,000 gallons needs 
re-painting and should not be neglected. A request of $1,000 has been made for 
this work. 

3. Subway and steam pipes to ward buildings: a request of $600 has been made 
for this to renew old pipes in the ground at the Gardner Cottages. These pipes 
have been in about 25 years and are giving trouble and should be replaced. 

Future Development 
Owing to the present general financial situation, it is doubtful if money will be 
appropriated for new construction in 1933. However, I am presenting those needs 
which are indicated when the money is available as follows: 

1. Storehouse and cold storage. At the present time our storehouse which was 
erected as a freight house in 1904 is entirely inadequate for the reception and dis- 
tribution of supplies. It is not properly equipped nor is it of sufficient size for the 
keeping of all supplies. Many articles are now distributed to other departments in 
bulk which is not as it should be. Our present system of distributing supplies not 
only is improper but not conducive to economy. 

In addition to the pressing need of suitable storage for supplies is presented the 
question of a suitable ice supply. There are 2,400 tons of ice harvested each year 
from a pond through which flows the erfiuent from a filtration area one half mile 
above. Water and ice from this pond have been analyzed by the Department 
of Public Health and this Department urges that at the earliest opportunity a better 
source of supply be obtained. There is no other source of supply on land owned 
by the Colony or adjacent to it. At present we are buying such quantities of ice 
as our appropriations permits. It would be very expensive to purchase ice for all 
departments and an ice making plant should be included in the storehouse develop- 
ment. Because of the possible danger to health this development should not be 
long postponed. 

2. Reception Building for 50 patients. As previously stated this building would 
provide for the reception of those patients who come directly from their homes, 
admitted for the first time to any hospital. The present surroundings to which they 
come are not conducive to the betterment of their mental condition. They find 
themselves in an environment which is altogether strange, rather alarming and 
not conducive to peace of mind and prospect of early recovery. The general effect 
upon relatives, to the general public at large, would be very much improved by 
receiving patients in a building of a general hospital type. 

At the same time there is a growing need for the reception of a certain class of 
patients in the early stages of mental or nervous trouble who are seen in consul- 
tation or in our out-patient ser\*ice and who would benefit by earlier treatment, 
but who hesitate to enter a mental hospital. Delay in these cases may be of serious 
consequence. If such a building were available we would see a tendency for patients 
to seek earlier treatment when the prospect of recovery is so much greater. Our 
attention must be focused upon the treatment of these earlier nervous and mental 
conditions. 

As stated in my last annual report, the time is approaching when provision should 
be made for further and complete study of delinquents. At the present time we 
are examining youths brought before the Juvenile Courts and the disposition of 
these cases depends largely upon our examination and recommendation. It is 
not desirable or fair to submit a report upon one relatively short examination which 
will mean so much in after life to the individual examined. I believe it desirable 
to provide for a more complete study of these juveniles. This proposed building 
would serve as a center for extra mural activities. Our social welfare work could 
well be centered there. It could well be the center for research in the ever growing 
field of mental hygiene. I believe that the addition of a building of this type planned 
and conducted on the general hospital idea would be a real step forward in state 
hospital development. 



12 



P.D. 70 



3. Cow Barn. An additional barn for stock is very badly needed. An appropria- 
tion was granted two years ago but construction not carried through. At the present 
time our young stock is being cared for in distant barns. They are not being given 
the care they should and would receive at a central farm group. Additional space 
is indicated and should be provided. 

4. Hay storage. Hay and grain are now being improperly stored in various 
places. This results in much handling and is not under good control. All feed should 
be centralized as should the livestock. 

5. Colony group for 35 patients. At the present time over-crowding in our 
present buildings is considerable and is likely to become greater. Evidently other 
buildings to house patients will be needed and I believe that colony groups planned 
and constructed by our own labor have advantages that should not be overlooked. 
The original intent of the Colony was that each year or every other year a Colony 
should be erected. Recent development has been along the lines of providing better 
hospital facilities. Need of further development is now found necessary and I 
believe the Colony type of development should be again taken up and continued. 
The advantage of such construction is that Colony buildings are much less expen- 
sive to build and may be located where farm land may be cleared which would 
provide occupation for the patients which is an essential part of their care. 

6. Purchase of land. There is a tract of land of about seventeen acres adjacent 
to the Central Group. When possible this should be purchased not only for its 
value at present to us but to prevent future encroachment. 

7. Superintendent's house. This has been urged each year by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Farm 

Farm operations have been carried on actively during the year and the return 
has been satisfactory. Again, as in former years, we have raised all vegetables, 
milk, pork, poultry that have been required for the dietary of the institution and 
some vegetables have been sold to other hospitals. Owing to the large yield, the 
cannery was operated during a longer period than in other years to care for excess 
fruit and vegetables. There were 32,998 cans of vegetables and fruit canned and 
delivered to the store. These have a value of $7,450.61. The unit price used for 
vegetables and fruit is as prescribed for all hospitals and state departments for 
comparative purposes. It is not the prevailing price in the market. The prevailing 
price in the market is ordinarily on the average in excess of prices used, quality 
considered. ■* 

The acreage under cultivation is 159.3 and in addition 128.9 acres in hay crop. 
The 159 acres were planted as follows: 20.4 potatoes; 54.9 garden crop; 37 en- 
silage corn; 45 oats and seeded; 2 acres mangles. 20.4 acres of potatoes yielded 
6,319 bushels or an average of 309 bushels per acre, valued at $3,791.05. There 
were 470 tons of ensilage corn harvested with a value of $2,820; 54.9 acres of garden 
crop produced has a value of $11,429.08. The value of the orchard and fruit crops 
was $942.21. The total value of all farm products for the year was $68,370.42. 
This assigned value is less than that of 1931 although the crop yield was larger 
owing to the fact that lower unit prices were used, following the trend of the pre- 
vailing market prices. 

Dairy. The entire herd passed the State and Federal test for tuberculosis this 
year for the sixth consecutive year. The average number of cows milked was 57.22. 
A total of 807,405.6 pounds of milk valued at $32,296.22 was produced. The 
average production per cow for the year was 14,110.84 pounds with an average of 
3.83% butter fat. The highest producing cow gave 22,117.5 pounds for the year 
with a butter fat of 3.7%. Owing to the high yield per cow, the inventory was in- 
creased during the year. This, at the beginning of the year, was $26,032.43. At 
the end of the year it was $29,154.33. The total cost per pound of milk produced 
was $.0303 which equals $.0651 per quart. In computing this cost all team labor, 
veterinary services, tools, etc., are included. The credits to the dairy total of 
$36,146.32. The net cost per pound of milk was $.0255 which is $.0548 per quart. 
The total gain in the dairy inventory was $14,755.08, 

Contagious abortion in the herd which was so prevalent in the previous year was 
less prevalent, two animals only being removed and slaughtered. 



P.D. 70 



13 



Mastitis which was also serious last year was less. The entire herd is now tested 
several times each month to determine the prevalence of mastitis and those found 
to be affected, and later the entire herd, have been treated with mastitis bacterin 
with apparent favorable results. There were 65 heifers treated for black leg and 
hemorrhagic septicaemia before going to pasture. For the past two years we 
suffered severe losses, from heifers going to pasture, from a disease not accurately 
diagnosed but resembling hemorrhagic septicaemia. This year all heifers were 
removed from pasture on July 17 and no losses occurred. 

A new DeLaval magnetic milking outfit has been installed; individual drinking 
cups fed by overhead system which have been in use for a number of years have 
been replaced throughout by an under fed system. A new 300 gallon Barrett 
pasteurizer has been installed and is giving excellent results. A sterilizing equip- 
ment has been added to the dairy. 

Sudne. The production of pork has been continued in a satisfactory manner. 
There have been no serious outbreaks of disease. There was 61,879 pounds of 
pork produced. The total cost of operating the department was $7,867.23. There 
was a total credit of $5,767.27 and an apparent loss of $2,851.91 due in part to in- 
ventory, there being 316 head at the beginning of the year and 239 at the end of 
the year, but also to the fact that the unit price of pork was reduced from fifteen 
cents per pound to eight cents per pound this year. Six pure bred boars were 
supphed to other hospitals. 

Poultry. More attention has been given to the poultry department especially 
in culling and the return has been satisfactory. 

Cannibalism was present last year but did not make its appearance this year. 
Of 2,000 day-old chicks purchased, the total loss was 4.3 S^, which was less than in 
former years. The cost of operating this department was $3,913.03. There was a 
net gain, after all operating expenses of $655.36. The total production of the 
poultry department was 464 lbs. geese; 459 lbs. duck; 1,037 lbs. turkey, 
345 lbs. rabbit; 2,063 3^ lbs. broilers; 1,207 lbs. chicken; 4,1483^ lbs. fowl; 
7,210 8/12 dozen eggs. 

Miscellaneous. There were 1,675 tons of stone removed from fields; 2,350 tons 
of rock excavated; 2,420 cubic yards of earth excavated; 840 sq. yds. of road re- 
built; 14,100 sq. yds. of road re-surfaced; 5,644 sq. yds. of grading; 360 sq. yds. 
of Macadam road; 15 sq. yds. of Macadam walk laid; 40 acres of land cleared of 
underbrush; 6.9 acres of pasture land cleared for fields. 

There has been 19,500 feet of lumber cut and sawed at the saw mill; 406 cords 
of wood cut; 2,400 tons of ice harvested; 1,200 tons of stone crushed at the stone 
crusher. 

Special mention should be made of the fact that Mr. George A. Marshall, 
Trustee, of Fitchburg, who is a large producer of apples, gave approximately 
3,000 bushels of apples to the Colony. With these we canned 2,001 gallons, made 
33 barrels of cider for vinegar and the balance was distributed daily, during the 
apple season, to all buildings so that our patients had all the apples they cared to 
eat. 

A list of those friends of the Colony who have contributed generously of maga- 
zines, material for the Occupational Therapy Department and to the patients 
themselves, is so large that it is not submitted in detail, but I wish to express thanks 
for their interest and assistance. 

I again wish to express to the officers of the Colony my full appreciation for their 
efforts and cooperation especially in behalf of the patients during the year just 
ended. 

Upon such cooperation depends the success of the work of the hospital and the 
welfare of those entrusted to our care. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 



14 



P.D. 70 



Productions for 
Garden vegetables, 731,0653^ lbs. 
Fruits and berries, 92,620 M lbs. 
Potatoes, 379,1643^ lbs. 
Mangles, 60,825 lbs. 
Milk, 807,405.6 lbs. . 
Eggs, 7,249 2 12 doz. 
Beef, 13,851 lbs. 
Veal, 1,714 lbs. . 
Liver, 680 lbs. . 
Hide, 1,951 lbs. 
Pork, 61,879 lbs. 
Poultry, 9,384 M lbs. 
Rabbit, 345 lbs.. 
Ensilage corn, 470 tons 
Oats, 32,532 lbs. 
Oats, green, 109 tons 
Oat straw, 17.5 tons 
Hay, clover 96.3 tons 
Hay, timothy 96.2 tons 
Clover, green, 20.5 tons 
Alfalfa, green, 39.0 tons 
Hay, green, 6.0 tons 
Hay, meadow, 15.0 tons 



Honey, 60 lbs. . 
Lumber cut: 

Pine, 15,000 ft. 

Spruce, 2,000 ft. 

Ash, 2,000 ft. 

Oak, 500 ft. . 
Wood cut, 460 cords 
Sawdust, 7 cords 
Ice, 2,400 tons . 
Stone crushed, 1,200 tons 
Fence stakes, 100 ea. 



1932 



$11,429.08 
942.21 
3,791.65 
182.48 
32,296.22 
2,537.21 
1,402.44 
154.26 
47.60 
57.25 
4,950.32 
2,401.13 
86.25 
2,820.00 
325.32 
708.50 
175.00 
1,733.40 
1,731.60 
143.50 
273.00 
30.00 
150.00 

$18.00 

$1,050.00 
130.00 
140.00 
35.00 
4,600.00 
7.00 
13,200.00 
1,800.00 
5.00 



$68,368.42 



Grand Total 



$20,985.00 
$89,353.42 



VALUATION 



November 30, 1932 
Real Estate 

Land, 1,856 acres $41,125.00 

Buildings 1,499,678.43 



$1,540,803.43 

Personal Property 

Travel, transportation and office expenses S300.00 

Food 13,439.88 

Clothing and materials 21,310.51 

Furnishings and household supplies 247,335.09 

Medical and general care 5 ,382 . 85 

Heat and other plant operation 4,696.76 

Farm 66,218.16 

Garage and grounds 11.826.75 

Repairs 21,948.10 



$392,458.10 

Summary 

Real estate $1,540,803.43 

Personal property 392,458.10 



$1,933,261.53 



P.D. 70 15 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
To the Deparimnt of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1932. 

Cash Account 
Receipts 

Income 

Board of Patients $32,144.49 

Personal services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 151.70 

Sales: 

Travel, transportation and office expenses $37.26 

Food 2,029.94 

Clothing and materials 137.58 

Medical and general care 19.75 

Heat and other plant operation 7.00 

Farm : 

Pigs and hogs 162.95 

Hides 18.02 

Hares 2.00 

Vegetables 349.51 

Garage, and grounds .55 

Repairs ordinary 35.65 

Arts and crafts sales 608 . 83 

Total sales $3,409.04 

Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances $766.71 

Rent 577.38 

Post office 180.00 

1,524.09 

Total incomes $37,229 .32 

M.\INTENAN'CE 

Balance from previous year, brought forward $14,730.24 

Appropriations, current year 446,150.00 

Total $460,880.24 

Expenses (as analysed below) 425,333.56 

Balance reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth $35,546.68 

Ayialysis of Expenses 

Personal services $232,347.92 

Religious instruction 1,451.75 

Travel, transportation and office expenses 4,401.85 

Food 44,948 . 06 

Clothing and materials 13,393.87 

Furnishings and household supplies 14,615 .62 

Medical and general care 24,729.94 

Heat and other plant operation 33,538.65 

Farm 29,058.47 

Garage and grounds 4,291.30 

Repairs ordinary 13,429 . 76 

Repairs and renewals 9,126.37 

Total expenses for Maintenance $425,333.56 

Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1 , 193 1 $200,129 . 33 

Appropriations for current year - 

Total $200,129.33 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $156,638 . 28 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth 14,254.18 

170,892.46 

Balance November 30, 1932, carried to next year $29,236.87 





Act or 




Expended 


Total 


Balance 


Object 


Resolve 


Whole 


during 


Expended 


at End 




Ch — Yr. 


Amount 


Fiscal Year 


to Date 


of Year 


Additional water supply . 


126-1924 










398-1926 


$42,000.00 


$1,575.60 


$38,487.46 


$3,512.54* 


Building for printing 


115-1930 


10,000 00 




9.996.33 


3.67* 


Employees' Cottage. 


115-1930 


12,000.00 




11,999.11 


.89* 


Two cottages for Officers . 


115-1930 


10,000.00 




9,779.99 


220.01* 


Hospital Building 


115-1930 


150,000.00 


253.48 


149,648.73 


351.27* 


Fire alarm system 


115-1930 


5.000.00 




4.834.20 


165.80* 


Cow barn 


115-1930 


10,000.00 






10.000.00* 


Furnishing hospital building . 


245-1931 


9,300.00 


2,413.05 


8.692.47 


607.53 


Coal trestle .... 


245-1931 


10.000.00 


9,525.40 


9,565.00 


435 . 00 


Employees' Cottage 1931 


245-1931 


14,000 00 


9.830.80 


9,830.80 


4.169.20 


Additional sewage disposal 


245-1931 


12,250.00 


5.584.58 


6.493.58 


5,756.42 


New heating plant, equipment 


269-1931 


150,000.00 


127.455.37 


131,731.28 


18.268.72 






$434,550.00 


$156,638.28 


$391,058.95 


$43,491.05 



16 



P.D. 70 



$43,491.05 



Balance reverting to Treasury of the Commonwealth during year (mark item with *) — . $14,254. 18 
Balance carried to next year 29,236.87 

Total as above 

Per Capita 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 1,344.843. 
Total cost of maintenance, $425,333.56. 
Exiual to a weekly per capita cost of $6.0821. 
Receipt from sales, $3,409.04. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.04874. 
All other institution receipts, $33,820.28. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.48361. 
Net weekly per capita $5.54975. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Gretjrude W. Perry, 



Treasurer. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 
Table 1. General Information 

Data correct at end of hospital year November 30, 1932 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings $1,540,803.43 

Personal property 392.458.10 

Total $1,933,261.53 

Total acreage of hospital property owned, 1,856. 

Total acreage under cultivation during previous year, 322.25. 

4. Officers and employees: 

Actually in Service Vacancies at End 

End of Year of Year 

M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Superintendents 1 - 1 - - 

Assistant physicians 6 1 7 - - - 

Clinical assistants - - - 1 - 1 

Total physicians 7 1 8 1 - 1 

Stewards 1 - 1 - - 

Resident dentists 1 - 1 - - - 

Pharmacists 1 - 1 - - - 

Graduate nurses - 9 9 - - - 

Other nurses and attendants .... 60 58 118 12 3 IS 

Occupational therapists - 5 5 - - - 

Social workers - 3 3 - - - 

All other officers and employees ... 54 38 92 2 5 7 

Total officers and employees . . .124 114 238 15 8 23 

Note: — The following items, 5-10 inclusive, are for the year ended September 30, 1932. 

5. Census of patient population at end of year: 

Absent from Hospital 
Actually in Hospital but Still on Books 

White: M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Insane 731 511 1,242 39 96 135 

Mental defectives 28 21 49 5 6 11 

Alcoholics 1 - 1 - - 

All other cases 1 1 2 1 1 2 

Total 761 533 1,294 45 103 148 

Other Races 

Insane 23 9 32 

Mental defectives 1 - 1 - - - 

Total 24 9 33 

Grand Total 785 542 1,327 45 103 148 

M. F. T. 

6. Patients under treatment in occupational-therapy classes, including 

physical training, on date of report 67 226 293 

7. Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of 

report 546 119 665 

8 Average daily number of all patients actually in hospital during 

year 750.257 522.657 1,272.914 

9. Voluntary patients admitted during year 4 6 10 

10. Persons given advice or treatment in out-patient clinics during year 289 148 437 

Table 2. Financial Statement 
See Treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



.D 70 



17 




18 P.D. 70 



Table 4. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 



Nativity — 


Patients 


Parents of 
Patients 


Male 


Parents of Female 
Patients 


M. 


F. 


T. 


Both 

Fathers Mothers Parents 


Fathers 


Both 
Mothers Parents 


TTnitpH *statp<! 


26 


21 


47 


13 


13 


11 


13 


1 1 


11 


V— aiidud • • • • 


3 


5 


8 


8 


6 


6 


6 


7 


6 


Sn^lcLIKi • • • 










1 










l^inlcLtid . • • • • 


3 


3 


6 


3 


3 


3 


6 


6 


6 


Gcrniciny 




1 


1 


















1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Ireland 




2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


4 


2 


Italy 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Poland 


2 




2 


3 


3 


3 








Russia ..... 










1 


1 








Scotland .... 








2 






1 






Sweden .... 


1 




1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


1 


Other countries . 




1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Unascertained 








2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Total .... 


36 


34 


70 


36 


36 


30 


34 


34 


31 



'Includes Newfoundland. 



20 



P.D. 70 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions 

Males Females Total 

Citizens by birth 26 21 47 

Citizens by naturalization 2 4 6 

Aliens 7 8 15 

Citizenship unascertained 1 1 2 

Total 36 34 70 



Table 6. Psychoses of First Admissions 



Psychoses 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 




T 


1. 


Traumatic psychoses 








1 


1 


2. 


Senile psychoses 






- 


4 


9 


3. 


Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 






- 


4 


9 


4. 


General paralysis 






2 




" 


5. 


Psychoses with cerebral syphilis 












6. 


Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 












7. 


Psychoses with brain tumor 












8. 


Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total .... 












9. 


Alcoholic psychoses, total 






5 


I 






Acute hallucinosis 


2 - 


2 










Other types, acute or chronic 


3 1 


4 








10. 


Psvchoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins, total 












11. 


Psychoses with pellagra 












12. 


Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total 




. . . . 




3 






Exhaustion delirium 


■ ■-■ ■ i" 












Diseases of the ductless glands 




1 










Other diseases or conditions 




1 








13. 


Manic-depressive psychoses, total 


........ 




4 


5 


9 




Manic type . 




" 2 










Depressive type 


3 4 


7 








14. 


Involution melancholia 






2 


3 


5 


15. 


Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 






5 


6 


11 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 






2 




2 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 












18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses, total 




. . . . 


1 


2 


3 




Psychasthenic type (anxiety and obsessive forms) 














Neurasthenic type 


1 1 


2 








19. 


Psychoses with psychopathic personality 












20. 


Psychoses with mental deficiency 






4 


3 




21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 












22. 


Without psychosis, total 


........ 




1 


1 


2 




Mental deficiency without psychosis 




' 2 










Total 




36 


34 


70 



Table 7. Ro£e of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Race 




Total 




Traumatic 


Senile 


With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerosis 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. .T. 




3 


2 


5 








1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




3 


6 


9 




















6 


6 


12 








2 




2 




1 1 


Greek 




1 


1 


















Hebrew . . . . . 


1 




1 


















Irish 


2 


2 


4 




1 


1 


1 




1 








1 


1 


2 






















1 


1 




















1 


1 


2 


















Scotch 


1 




1 




















3 




3 




















13 


12 


25 










2 


2 


4 


2 6 




2 


2 


4 








1 


1 


2 




1 1 


Total 


36 


34 


70 




1 


1 


5 


4 


9 


5 


4 9 



^Includes "North" and "South." 
^Norwegiands, Danes and Swedes. 

^Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian. Delmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Monxavia, Polish, 
Russian, Ruthenian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 



Race 


General 
paralysis 


Alcoholic 


With other 
somatic 
diseases 


Manic- 
depressive 


Involution 
melancholia 





M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


English 
















1 


1 


2 




- 


- 


Finnish 




1 


2 


1 


3 








2 


2 








French 


- 1 


1 






















1 


Greek 




























Hebrew 




























Irish 












1 


1 














Italian 1 
















1 




1 








Lithuanian ..... 
























1 


1 


Scandinavian* .... 


















1 










Scotch 




























Slavonic ' 






2 




2 


















Mixed 




1 








- 2 


2 




1 


2 


2 




3 


Race unascertained 






1 




1 


















Total 


2 1 


3 


5 


1 


6 


- 3 


3 


4 


5 


9 


2 


3 


5 



Table 7. /2ace of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 











Paranoia 


Psycho- 










Dementia 


and 


neuroses 


With mental 


Without 


Race 


praecox 


paranoid 


and 


deficiency 


psychoses 










conditions 


neuroses 










M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. F. T. 


EngUsh 






















3 


3 












French 


2 




2 




1 1 


2 


1 3 


1 1 






1 














Hebrew 


1 




1 
























1 


- 1 




Italian » 










- 1 1 








Lithuanian 


















Scandinavian ' . . . . 












1 


- 1 




Scotch 










1 - 1 




























2 


2 


4 


2-2 






2 2 




Race unascertained 


















Total 


5 


6 


11 


2-2 


1 2 3 


4 3 7 


1 1 2 



^Includes "North" and "South." 
»Norwegiands, Danes, and Swedes. 

^Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Delmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin, Moravian, Polish. 
Russian, Ruthenian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



22 P.D. 70 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 















15-19 






20-24 




25-29 






Psychoses 




Tota 






years 






years 




years 








M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic 


~ 


1 


1 


















2. 




5 


4 


9 


















3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


5 


4 


9 


















4. 




2 


1 


3 


















5. 


























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 
























7. 


With brain tumor 
























8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases 
























9. 


Alcoholic ....... 


5 


1 


6 


















10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 
























1 1 . 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases 


~ 


3 


3 


















13. 


Manic-depressive. ..... 


4 


5 


9 


~ 


1 


1 


1 




1 






14. 


Involution melancholia .... 


2 


3 


5 


















15. 




5 


6 


11 




3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 — 


1 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 


2 




2 


















17. 


Epileptic psychoses . . . 
























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


2 


3 














1 


1 


19 


With psycho p^ithic pcrsoncilitv 
























20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


4 


3 


7 




1 


1 












21. 


Undiagnosed psyciioses .... 
























22. 




1 


1 


2 


1 




1 














- ■••'-^otal . . . . • . 


36 


34 


70 


1 


5 


6 


2 


1 


3 


1 1 


2 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 









30-34 






35-39 






40-44 






45-49 






Psychoses 




years 






years 






years 






years 








M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic 


























2. 




























3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


























4. 




























5. 




























6. 


With Huntington's chorea .... 






















































8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases . ' 


























9. 


Alcoholic 










1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 


























11. 


With pellagra 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases 






















1 


1 


13. 






2 


2 








2 


1 


3 


1 




1 


14. 


















1 


1 




1 


1 


15. 




1 




1 


1 




1 














16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




















1 




1 


17. 




























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 








1 


1 


2 














19. 


With psychopathic personality . 


























20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 


























22. 












1 


1 


















2 


2 


4 


3 


4 


7 


4 


3 


7 


3 


2 


5 



P.D. 70 



23 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified ivith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 









50-54 






55-59 . 




60-64 






65-69 




70 year 




Psychoses 




years 






years 




years 






years 




and over 







M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 
























1 1 


2. 


Senile 


















1 


1 


2 


4 3 7 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 












1 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


3 2,5 


4. 


General paralysis 


2 


1 


3 




















5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 


























6. 


With Huntington's chorea . 


























7. 


With brain tumor . 


























8. 


With other brain or nervous 




























diseases .... 


























9. 


Alcoholic .... 


2 


— 


2 


















1 - 1 


10. 


Due to drugs and other ex- 




























ogenous toxins . 


























11. 


With pellagra. 


























12. 


With other somatic diseases. 


— 


1 


1 


















1 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive . 














1 


1 










14. 


Involution melancholia 


- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 










15. 


Dementia praecox 


1 


2 


3 




















16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 




























ditions .... 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- - - 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 


























lo. 


Psycho neuroses and neuroses 


























19. 


With psychopathic person- 






















































20. 


With mental deficiency 


1 




1 




















21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 


























22. 


Without psychosis 




























Total 


6 


5 


11 


2 


- 2 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 


5 


8 7 15 



Table 9. Degree of Education of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 

Principal Psychoses 

















Reads and 


Common 




High 






Psychoses 




Total 




Illiterate 


writes* 


School 




School 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 




1 


1 














1 


1 








2. 




5 


4 


9 






1 




1 


4 


3 


7 




1 


1 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


5 


4 


9 








1 


1 


5 


3 


8 








4. 


General paralysis 


2 


1 


3 












1 


1 


2 






1 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 






























6. 


With Huntington's chorea. 






























7. 


With brain tumor 






























8. 


With other brain or nervous 
































diseases .... 






























9. 


Alcoholic .... 


5 


1 


6 


2 


- 2 


1 




1 


2 


1 


3 








10. 


Due to drugs and other ex- 
































ogenous toxins. 






























11. 


With pellagra 






























12. 


With other somatic diseases 




3 


3 










1 




2 


2 








13. 


Manic-depressive 


4 


5 


9 












2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


4 


14. 


Involution melancholia 


2 


3 


5 




1 1 








2 


1 


3 




1 




15. 


Dementia praecox 


5 


6 


11 








2 


2 


4 


2 


6 


1 


2 


3 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 
































ditions .... 


2 




2 












2 




2 








17. 


Epileptic psychoses . 






























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


2 


3 












1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


19, 


With psychopathic person- 






























20. 


With mental deficiency 


4 


3 


7 


1 


- 1 








2 


3 


5 






1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 






























22. 


Without psychosis 


1 


1 


2 












1 




1 




1 






Total 


36 


34 


70 


3 


1 4 


2 


4 


6 


26 


21 


47 


5 


8 


13 



'Includes those who did not complete fourth grade in school. 



24 



P.D. 70 



Table 10. Enrironynent of First Admissions Classified urith Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Tota 




Urban 


Rural 






-M. 


r . 


I . 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .......... 


7 




1 




1 








2. 


Senile 




4 


9 


4 


2 


6 


7 


2 3 


3. 


With cerebral artericclero^i^ 






9 




4 


9 






4. 


General oaralv«is . . ... 


T 

■i. 




3 


2 




2 




I I 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis ........ 


















6. 








































8. 


With other brain or ner\'oii5 diseases .... 


7 
















9 


Alcoholic 








- 


1 


6 


I 




10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 








- 






- 


- - 


11. 




















12. 


With other somatic diseases 




_ 

J 


_ 
3 




3 


3 




- - 


13. 






5 


9 


4 


5 


9 


- 




14. 




2 


3 


5 


2 


3 


5 






15. 




5 


6 


11 


5 


5 


10 




1 1 


16. 




2 




2 


1 




1 


1 


1 




Epileptic psychoses 


















18.' 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


1 


2 


3 




2 


2 


1 


— 1 


19. 


With psychopathic personality 


















20. 


With mental deficiencv 


4 


3 


/ 


3 


3 


6 


1 


1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 


















22. 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 








Total 


36 


34 


70 


32 


30 


62 


4 


4 8 



Table 11. Economic Cojidition of First Admissions Classified with Reference 
to Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 




Total 




Dependent 


Marginal 


Comfortable 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic 




1 


1 
















1 1 


2. 


Senile 


5 


4 


9 


4 


3 




1 


1 


2 






3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


5 


4 


9 


4 


1 


5 


1 


2 


3 




1 1 


4. 


General paralysis 


2 


1 


3 


2 




2 




1 


1 






5. 


With cerebral svphilis 
























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 
























7. 


With brain tumor 
























8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases 
























9. 


Alcoholic 


5 


1 


6 


3 




3 


2 


1 


3 






10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 
























11. 


With pellagra 
























12. 


With other somatic diseases 




3 


3 










2 


2 




1 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive 


4 


5 


9 








4 


5 


9 






14. 


Involution melancholia .... 


2 


3 


5 








2 


3 


5 






15. 


Dementia praecox 


5 


6 


11 


2 


2 


4 


2 


3 


5 


1 


1 2 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 






17. 


Epileptic psychoses 
























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 


1 


2 


3 




1 


1 


1 


1 


2 






19. 


With psychopathic personality. 
























20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


4 


3 




3 


2 


5 




1 


1 


1 


1 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses .... 
























22. 




1 


1 


2 








1 


1 


2 








Total 


36 


34 


70 


19 


9 


28 


15 


21 


36 


2 


4 6 



P.D. 70 



25 



Table 12. Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 































Unascer- 




Psychoses 




Tota 




Abstinent 


Temperate 


Intemperat 


tained 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 




- 


1 


1 




1 


1 
















2. 




5 


4 


9 


4 


3 


7 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 




- 1 1 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


5 


4 


9 


2 


4 


6 


2 




2 


1 




1 


- - - 


4. 


General paralysis .... 


2 


1 


3 


~ 


1 


1 


~ 




~ 


2 




2 


— - — 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis 




























6. 


With Huntington's chorea 




























7. 


With brain tumor .... 




























8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases 




























9. 


Alcoholic 


5 


1 


6 














5 


1 


6 


- - - 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous 


























































11. 






























12. 


With other somatic diseases . 


- 


3 


3 




2 


2 














_ _ _ 


13. 


Manic-depressive .... 


4 


5 


9 


1 


4 


5 


3 


1 


4 










14 


Involution melancholia 


2 


3 


5 


1 


3 


4 








1 




1 




15. 


Dementia praecox .... 


5 


6 


11 


3 


5 


8 


2 


1 


3 










16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 


2 




2 


2 




2 
















1 7. 


Epileptic psychoses .... 




























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 










19. 


With psychopathic personality 




























20. 


With mental deficiency . 


4 


3 


7 


3 


2 


5 


1 


1 


2 










21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses . 




























22. 


Without psychosis .... 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 




















36 


34 


70 


18 


27 


45 


9 


5 


14 


9 


1 


10 


- 1 1 



26 



P.D. 70 



fN CN I 



03 CS C ^ . 



5 -.-c 



I 1- to (U 



s 0) =^ £ 



2 c 

^ 2 S•=■S■«^•- 
i s o '-5 5 a E 5i = o 



P.D. 70 



27 



Table 14. Psychoses of Readmissions 



Psychoses Males Females Total 

1. Traumatic psychoses - - - 

2. Senile psychoses - - - 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 1 - 1 

4. General paralysis - - - 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis - - - 

6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea - 1 1 

7. Psychoses with brain tumor - - - 



8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases . 

9. Alcoholic psychoses 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 



11. Psychoses with pellagra - - 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases - 1 1 

13. Manic-depressive psychoses 1 5 6 

14. Involution melancholia - - - 

15. Dementia praecox 4 1 5 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions 1 - 1 

17. Epileptic psychoses - 1 1 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses - 1 1 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality - 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency - 1 1 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses 

22. Without psychosis - 1 1 

Total •....? 12 19 



T\BLB 15. Diszharje^ of Patietts Cla^v.fiei with R?fere ice to Prin,cipal Psychoses 

and C) iiiiij i Dischirge 



Psychoses 




Total 




Improved 


Unimproved 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic 


















2. 






1 


1 




1 


1 






3. 






2 


2 




2 


2 






4. 


General paralysis 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 






5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 


1 




1 


1 




1 






6. 


With Huntington's chorea 


















7. 




















8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


















9. 




3 




3 


3 




3 






10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 


















11. 




















12. 




1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 






13. 




2 


6 


8 


2 


6 


8 






14. 






3 


3 




2 


2 




1 1 


15. 




3 


3 


6 


3 


3 


6 






16. 






1 


1 




1 


1 






17. 




















18. 




1 


3 


4 




2 


2 


1 


1 2 


19. 




















20. 


With mental deficiency 


4 




4 


4 




4 






21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 


















22. 


Without psychosis 


2 


1 


3 














Total 


18 


24 


42 


15 


20 


35 


1 


3 4 



28 



P.D. 7 



1^ 



ji 2.2 s 



rj" CN « ^ ( 



W — ^ ^ , 



IT) CN I -H cs 



S 



He 



2 cs 

«^ 1- 



o o 



E 2 



C S 



o >. 



■ £ § 



c = 
ci 3 
OH 



P2» 



4/ 4/ ~ 

uoc 



y 5s 



2i 

o — 
Ef 



o 
'5. 

CO 



O to 

E4J 
to 
3 re 
c o 

C.tO 

a-o 
JO 



!3~ 

Q5 



• S 

to 3 
111 

.III 

3 — T3 
3 U O 

in«0 



P.D. 70 



29 



I 



.2 "= c 
c _ "5 .2 



ilii 

f o 



3 3 



S g 

u u 

1 = 

cs 3^ 



ill 



t; 'x 

j3 



>< s 



ll 

I • 

wC5 



-1 11 
l2 =1 



II 11, III II I 



•i rt 3 



P.D. 70 



31 



•if* 



O 
¥0 



C3i 

'Si 



I 

•IS 

I 

o 



to & n 



o c 
cd cs c3 c i, 



JVJ (N 'S' • 



S 2 

3 5 



II. 

sis 



X CO ej ! 



X! 

o aj 



: c 5 
: o c 

1 £ rt 



c. tJ-a 5 » 



32 



P 1) 70 




33 



Table 19. Family Care Department 



laily Care, Octobo^. 1. 1931 
-he year .... 
: cases within the year 



piiy care, ^jepcemba^ 30. 1932 
S-.ate 



-^ons wiUdn the year 
"r^r"? trithin the year dismissed 
- ^ -xithin the year admitted 
rzuly Care doling the jrear: 



Maks 


Females 


Total 


5 


64 


69 


5 


44 


49 


10 


108 


118 


4 

_ 


36 


40 

— 


- 
6 


72 


to 


6 


72 


78 


6 


45 


51 


4 


28 


32 


5 


36 


41 


6 323 


62.471 


68.794 



V 



Public Document No. 70 ^ 

Olommnnturaltlj of ^Ma0Barl^uHrtta 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TH^ 

TRUSTEES 



Gardner State Colony ^.^.^^ 

FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 

1933 

Department of Mental Diseases 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
500. 3-'34 Order 737. 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE COLONY 
EAST GARDNER. MASS. 

c 



GARDNER STATE COLONY 

[Post Office Address: East Gardner, Mass.] 

BOARD OP TRUSTEES 
Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 
Owen A. Hoban, Gardner. 

George A. Marshall, Fitchburg.— Cf4*f >^ ,. 
Fred N. Dillon, Fitchburg. 
Richard T. Fisher, Weston. 
Miss Grace Nichols, Boston. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent. 
Henry L. Clow, M.D., Assistant Superintendent. 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Senior Physician. 
Harold K. Marshall, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Mary Danforth, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Earl D. Dorris, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
Lee W. Darrah, M.D., Assistant Physician. 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist. 
Myron L. Marr, Steivard. 
Hall C. Bowman, Head Farmer. 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer. 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer. 
Elizabeth Friberg, Social Worker. 

Mary Anne Chisholm, R.N., Principal of the School of Nursing. 

DIRECTORS IN INDUSTRIES 
Lillian A. Greene, Supervisor of Industries for Women. 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of W^eaving, Knitting, etc. 
Newton E. Smallwood, Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Carl Lindquist, Supervisor of Tailoring. 
Anthony P. Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Elof R. Teir, Supervisor of Printing. 

SUPERVISORS 
Viola Farnham, G.N., Women's Infirmary. 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary. 
Ila W. Kennedy, G.N., Women's Hospital Building. 
MoNA Bishop, G.N., Men's Hospital Building. 
Elvira I. Winchenbach, G.N., Women's Treatment Building. 
Daa'iel M. Campeell, Men's Treatment Building. 

" ' ' • RELIGIOUS SERVICES 

Rev. James Fitzgibbons, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant 

; t Li \ r, ; , TRUSTEES' REPORT 
To His Excellsncy, the {governor and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees of the Gardner State Colony have the honor to present herewith 
their thirty-first annual report. 

The report of the Superintendent to the Trustees is submitted herewith and 
made a part hereof by reference. In it will be found the detailed record of the 
changes in the colony population; the treatment and care of the patients; the 
cost of maintenance; the needs of the institution; statistical tables and such other 
facts as are necessary to give an accurate view of the acti\dties and accomplish- 
ments of the Gardner State Colony for the past year. We respectfully invite 
attention to it. 

By prudent and careful management, without any impairment in the quality 
of the care or the efficiency of the treatment of the patients, a reduction of 9% 
was made in the per capita cost on gross expenditure as compared with a like 
cost for 1932. Of the gross appropriation granted for 1933, $24,248.42 was unex- 
pended at the end of the year and reverted to the treasury of the Commonwealth. 



70 



3 



Because of a serious doubt as to the purity of the ice for personal consumption 
produced at the colony, all ice for such use is being bought from an outside ice 
supply. We shall be obliged to continue this practice until the new storehouse 
and cold storage plant has been built. Plans for that structure provided for ice 
making facilities which will have an output of artificial ice which we hope will be 
adequate for our immediate needs. In addition to the supply which will then be 
available we recommend that small units for artificial refrigeration be installed 
in the outlying colony groups and in the hospital buildings thus doing away with 
the inconveniences of bulk ice refrigeration and outmoded ice boxes. 

In June of 1933, your Trustees gave serious consideration to the fire protection 
facilities of the colony. A study of several reports which have been made from 
time to time by the state fire marshalls and our own studies lead us to the con- 
clusion that the installation of additional fire protection at the Gardner State 
Colony is imperative and we earnestly recommend that the appropriations for 
that purpose which have been requested in our 1934 budget be granted. 

At the time of the inauguration of the P.W.A. program we submitted a list of 
additional buildings and alterations to existing buildings which we considered 
necessary for the proper carrjang on of the work of the Gardner State Colony. 
Of these projects formal approval has been granted for one only; a storehouse and 
cold storage plant. Upon this project no work has been started for the reason 
that no money has been received. 

While we are not unmindful of the limitations which changed economic con- 
ditions have placed upon the power of the Commonwealth to make large commit- 
ments in the further development of its institutions devoted to the care and treat- 
ment of the mentally ill, we do not feel that the commitments already made ought 
to be curtailed or that the difficulties of the moment should be an excuse for a 
policy of retrenchment which will bring about a retreat from the high place Massa- 
chusetts occupies in this humanitarian work. 

When we submitted a list of needs for approval under the P.W.A, program, 
we did not include anything which was not needed by the Gardner State Colony 
and we recommend that these additions and alterations be pro\ided as soon as 
possible as part of a well considered program for the development of this insti- 
tution. 

Following is a list of projects submitted for approval under the P.W.A. program: 

1. Storehouse with Cold Storage Facilities. 

2. Changes in Electrical Equipment. 

3. Construction of Cow Barn. 

4. Construction of Hay Barn. 

5. A Domestic and Dormitory Building at Valley Farm. 

6. A Building for the Acute and Curable. 

7. A Textile Building. 

8. Enlargement of the Assembly Building. 

At the July 1938 meeting of the Trustees, Mrs. Amie H. Coes of Worcester, 
resigned as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. She 
was appointed to this Board in 1901 and has given continuous service ever since. 
She was for many years secretary of the Board, an active interested worker for 
the welfare of the Colony and made a substantial worthwhile contribution to the 
ser\'ice of the Commonwealth. 

On September 20th, 1933, George N. Harwood, of Barre, formerly a Trustee 
of the Gardner State Colony, died at the age of 91 years. Mr. Harwood was one 
of the original Board of Trustees appointed to establish this institution. 

On the occasion of his death the Trustees adopted formal resolutions com- 
memorating his services, in part as follows: — 

"On his advice the Governor of the Commonwealth, acting through 
the State Board of Insanity, established this institution on its present 
location. He was present at the inauguration of the work here under- 
taken for the relief of suffering humanity and for twenty-five years 
watched the flowering of the hope which was here planted. That he 



4 



P.D. 70 



had just pride in the work which his authority forwarded and developed 
cannot be doubted by those of us who enjoyed his presence and the help- 
fulness of his counsel. To hear him speak of the trees, the proper use 
of the soil, the care of the animals, the comfort and proper housing of 
the patients, was to sense how deeply he loved every stick and stone of 
the land of this institution, and how concerned he was for the welfare of 
those who lived upon it. Countryman always, he exemplified in his life 
the prudence, wisdom, solid worth, fidelity, patience and high character 
of those who live on and from the soil. On such men as George N. 
Harwood is built the real worth and power of great nations." 

In its extra mural activities the Gardner State Colony is each year making 
larger and more useful contributions of service to the community of cities and 
towns which surround it. Through its out-patient consultation clinic, child guid- 
ance clinic, school clinic and assistance to the Juvenile Court in problem cases, 
it has been able to render a special kind of service of great value, much appreci- 
ated by the public authorities, the medical profession and the people with whom 
it comes in contact. 

In addition to this work the Colony is being frequently used as a convenient 
place for meetings of medical, dental and other professional groups whose major 
interest is closely allied to the work of the institution. These activities we en- 
dorse and encourage as valuable helps in bringing the institution into closer con- 
tact with the community and dissipating the idea that it is a place remote from 
the life about it. 

Your Trustees are impressed with the spirit of kindness and sympathy for 
patients and the cooperation in furthering the work of this institution which is 
the characteristic mark of the staff, attendants, and workers under the leader- 
ship of the Superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Owen A. Hoban Fred N. Dillon 

George A. Marshall Grace Nichols 

Richard T. Fisher Frederick A. Washburn 

February 21, 1934 Trustees 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

Herewith is respectfully presented my report as Superintendent of the Gardner 
State Colony for the hospital year ending September 30 and the financial year 
ending November 30, 1933. 

Movement of Population 







Male 


Female 


Total 


1. 


On the books of the institution Sept. 30, 1932 . 


830 


645 


1,475 




Actually resident 


785 


542 


1,327 




In family care 


6 


72 


78 




Absent on visit 


20 


30 


50 




Absent without leave 


19 


1 


20 


2. 


Admitted during the year 


65 


65 


130 




First admissions 


53 


47 


100 




Readmissions 


10 


16 


26 




By transfer . . . . . ' . 


2 


2 


4 


3. 


Total number on books during the year . 


895 


710 


1,605 


4. 


Dismissed during the year 


62 


67 


129 




Discharged (excluding transfers and deaths) 


27 


37 


64 




Recovered 


4 




4 




Improved 


12 


27 


39 




Not improved 


2 


3 


5 




Without psychosis 


9 


7 


16 




Transferred 


4 


1 


5 




Died 


31 


29 


60 



P.D. 70 






5 


5. Number in family care Oct. 1, 1932 


6 


72 


78 


Transferred from Colony to family care . 


- 


43 


43 


Returned from family care to Colony 


2 


36 


38 


Number remaining Sept. 30, 1933 .... 


4 


79 


83 


XN UiliUci Ul laHiliy edit: liUIlIco ..... 






24 


Average number per family 






3.458 


6. Remaining on books of the institution Sept. 30, 1933 


833 


643 


1,476 


At the Colony 


776 


528 


1,304 


In family care 


4 


79 


83 


Absent on visit 


23 


35 


58 


Absent without leave 


30 


1 


31 



Statistical Review: 

There were 130 admissions. The status of these was: voluntary 11; temporary 
care 17; observation 6; regular court commitment 96. Of these four were received 
by transfer from other hospitals. 

The age on admission of those committed was: 40 under 50 years of age; 35 
over 50 years of age. Of these 18 were over 70, Only 9 were under 25 years of age. 

Education: Of the 75 that were received by first commitment, 21 had received 
a high school education; 38 a common school education and 12 less than common 
school or were illiterate. 

Citizenship: 50 were citizens by birth; 10 were citizens by naturalization; 13 
were aliens and 2 undetermined. 

Nativity of Parents: Of the 75 first admissions there were 47 in which one or 
both parents were of foreign birth. Of 50 citizens admitted both parents were 
born in the United States in 28 instances. 

Marital Condition: 35 were single; 26 married; 12 widowed; 1 separated and 
1 divorced. 

Economic Condition: Designated as comfortable 12; marginal 40; dependent 23. 

Environment: 25 were residents of cities or towns under 10,000 population; 50 
were from cities of 10,000 or more. 

Use of Alcohol: Histories show that 54 abstained; 14 used liquor moderately; 
7 were intemperate. 

Diagnosis on Admission: 13 were suffering from senile psychosis; 10 psychosis 
with cerebral arteriosclerosis; 12 dementia praecox; 5 psychosis with physical 
disease; 2 with alcoholic psychosis. The remainder of various types, 8 of whom 
had a background of mental defect. 

Re-admissions: 17 were admitted who had previously been under hospital care. 
Of these 6 were suffering from manic depressive psychosis and 5 from dementia 
praecox. The remainder of various types. 

Termination of Hospital Residence: Compared with 130 admitted during the 
year, 129 had residence terminated: 64 discharged; 60 removed by death; 5 trans- 
ferred to other hospitals. Condition on Discharge: Of the 64 discharged, 4 were 
discharged as recovered and 39 as improved or 61%; 5 or 8% not improved; 16 
or 25% as without psychosis. 

Deaths The principle causes of death in the 60 who died were: cardiovascular 
disease 51.8%; carcinoma 9.2%; syphilis 7.2%; tuberculosis 1.8%,; 48.2% of 
those who died were over 70 years of age at the time of death; 35.2% were be- 
tween 50 and 70 years and only 16.6% were under 50 years of age. 16 of those 
who died had had a hospital residence of 20 or more years; 3 others a hospital 
residence of from 10 to 20 years and 10 a hospital residence of from 5 to 10 years. 
Fourteen had a hospital residence of 1 year or less, these being quite elderly people 
in weakened physical condition when admitted. 

Community Activities 
Extra mural activities have been continued under the supervision of William 
A. Hunter, M. D., assisted by a psychologist, 2 social workers and a clerk. Child 
guidance clinics have been held regularly in Fitchburg and Gardner. That held in 
Fitchburg has continued from previous years. Two newly established clinics 
have been conducted in Gardner. These clinics have met with splendid cooperation 



6 



P.D. 70 



and it is felt that they are of material help to the parents, to the child and to a.! 
those whose acti\ities bring them in touch with children. There have been 14 7 
cases studied. Of the 112 new cases 6S were seen at the Fitchburg clinic: 31 at 
the Gardner clinic and 15 in other towns in the district. Whenever possible we 
have insisted that the parent or guardian come with the child hoping thereby t ~' 
obtain cooperation of the parent or guardian that the whole family situation may 
be studied as well as the condition of the child. Studies are divided into 2 groups : 
those presenting serious problems needing a number of contacts and those where 
only 1 or a few contacts are needed in order to determine the ability to perform 
school work. The ages of children studied varied from 2 to 17 years. 

A group study of the intelligence rating shows that in cases referred by the 
family, Sb-1 were placed in the superior, normal or dull group and only 15 
in the mentally deficient group. Of those presented by the school authorities. 
7S' c were placed in the superior, normal or dull group and 22*^ in the mentahy 
deficient group. Of those children referred by agencies or the court, only 40 
were found to be in the superior, normal or dull group and 60 -"c in the mentals- 
deficient group. 

The nurserj' school in Fitchburg continued in its third year with 7 boys and 
10 girls attending. The ages range from 2 to 5 years. An examination of these 
children showed that 9 were in the superior group and 8 were placed in the normal 
group. This nursery school has been an interesting experiment. It is conducted 
under the supervision of the Fitchburg Teachers College. 

The clinic as a whole has had more children referred to it for examination than 
in the pre^'ious year. Particularly was this noticed in the number referred by 
parents. More have been referred by school authorities. There has been a de- 
cided falling off in the number referred by agencies, and a decrease in the number 
of court cases. 

Members of the out-patient staff addressed 16 public meetings in 6 different 
towns and cities. These lectures seem decidedly worth while as they focus at- 
tention upon the clinic and let it be known that they are available to all seeking 
ad%ice. A follow-up study of all cases, some 400 in number, is now being made 
to determine as accurately as possible the value of the child guidance clinic. 

Those children who have been brought before a court for minor misdemeanors, 
are referred to the clinic for study for the determination of their mentality and 
recommendation: 24 boys and 4 girls were examined. Of these, 6 were found to 
be normal, 4 dull, S borderline: S feebleminded: 1 psychopathic personality and 1 
suffering from mental disease. The ages ranged from 7 to 17. They were re- 
ferred for the following infringements: larceny, 13: sex, 5: neglected children, 5; 
setting fire to and assault and battery, 1: illegal possession of fire arms, 1. Recom- 
mendations were made as follows: proper placement in, 10; probation, 10; insti- 
tutional care, S. They were largely disposed of according to these recommendations. 

School CLI^^cs 

Backward children in public schools were examined in 9 cities and towns. 
There are still 20 towns in this district in which the Superintendent of Schools 
has made no request for examination. 273 children were examined, this being the 
first examination for 247. Of these 195 were boys and 7S girls. The difference in 
numbers seems to be accounted for because the boys are apt to have beha^iour 
problems in school while girls are likely to be of a more retiring nature. As a 
result of the examination of these problem children, we find the following: feeble- 
minded, 36: borderline, 69: dull, 91; normal, 74; superior, 2; deferred, 1. Recom- 
mendations made were as follows: Special classes, 36: institutional care, 2; con- 
tinue in grade, 235. 

Out Patient Clixic 
This clinic has been continued in Fitchburg where all may come to consult re- 
garding friends or relatives who may be suffering from nervous or mental disease. 
Sixty new cases were seen: 30 of these were later admitted to the hospital. This 
clinic is also used, that patients on visit from the colony may report for ad\'ice 
and that their present mental condition may be determined. Consultation at the 
colony may be had at any time. 



P.D. 70 



; Family Care 

This is a part of the service which we have carried on actively for many years. 
' There were 78 in family care at the beginning of the year and 83 at the close. The 
I family care system has pro\-ided very satisfactory' home life for those who do not 
need expensive hospital care. Patients placed in family care have been visited 
frequently by the family care visitor, dentist, occupational therapist and several 
times each year by a physician. 

General Medical 

Dr. Nathan C. Robey resigned October 25, 1933. He had been a member of 
the medical staff since June 6, 1931. He left to enter private practise in Connecti- 
cut. The vacancy thus caused was filled by the appointment of Dr. Earl Dorris 
who assumed his duties November 1, 1933. He is a graduate of the Vanderbilt 
University Medical School, Nash\ille, Tenn., was for 4 years assistant physician 
at the Western State Hospital, Bolivar, Tenn., and joined our staff after training 
at the Psychopathic Hospital in Boston. 

Dr. Harold K. Marshall, member of the staff since February 28, 1928 was pro- 
moted to senior physician, December 20, 1933 in charge of the women's ser\ice. 

The same cooperative spirit as in past years has existed in relation to the con- 
sulting medical staff and we are indebted to: Dr. A. F. Lowell, Gardner, Surgeon; 
Or. H. D. Bone, Gardner, Opthalmologist: Dr. G. A. Mossman, Gardner, Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon; Dr. C. H. Jennings, Fitchburg, Roentgenologist. Their services 
have been frequently sought and freely given. 

Various meetings have been held at the colony during the year: The Worcester 
North District Medical Society with SO present, met with us on October 25; 
Gardner Rotary Club on June 22: The District Society for Mental Hygiene, Dec- 
ember 14: Wachusett Dental Society, November 20, 1932 and again November 1, 
1933; The Economic Class of the Ashby High School for instruction on June 11; A 
class from the Fitchburg Teachers College, July 17. Two public mental hygiene 
clinics were held in Gardner. 

Dental Department 
Under the leadership of James H. Maycock, D.M.D., this department has con- 
tinued active throughout the year in the examination and treatment of all patients 
under care. Still greater interest has been shown in the determination of causes 
of pathological mouth conditions through bacteriological and pathological studies. 
Bacteriological smears are studied in every case and particular attention is being 
paid to the younger patients in which many pathological conditions are found. 
X-ray has shown that impacted teeth frequently occur in recoverable cases which 
react upon the mental condition. Forty-one impacted teeth have been found and 
removed. Several papers on scientific work that has been done have been pre- 
sented by the dentist before dental societies of Massachusetts and a clinic on 
local anaesthesia and oral surgery was conducted for the American Dental Associ- 
ation at the National Meeting held at Chicago. Following is a report of work 
done in this department during the year: 



Number of patients treated 4,425 

Examinations 4,425 

Prophylaxes 1,448 

Fillings 252 

Amalgam, 174; cement, 10; synthetic, 40; gutta percha, 26: inlays, 2. 

Root canal treatments 58 

Extractions, local 447 

Plates 82 

Full denture, IT; adjusted, 33; repaired, 32. 

Bridges and crowns removed 14 

Oral surgical operations 254 

Lanced drained abscesses 92 

Surgical extractions 26 

Fracture 1 

Alveolectomies 53 



8 



P.D. 70 



Cysts 21 

Other miscellaneous operations 20 

Treatment for 1,347 

Carcinoma involving the antrim and maxilla .... 1 

Pyorrhea-surgical and otherwise 510 

Vincents infection 252 

Miscellaneous treatment for pathological conditions . . . 186 

Pre-operative treatments 152 

Post-operative treatments 246 

X-rays taken 107 

Miscroscopic smears 1,619 



Inasmuch as the actual positive factors in many types of mental diseases 
remain unknown, it is essential that ample study is made of every part of the 
human anatomy to discover, if possible, the cause for the exciting influence that 
contribute. Such studies are being constantly made, especially is this true in the 
study of mouth conditions. 

Psychiatric Training School 
A 2 year course given to attendants in the general care of the sick with special 
reference to caring for psychiatric cases, instituted in 1930, has been successfully 
continued. Ten seniors completed the course satisfactorily. Three were placed 
in charge positions at this hospital as Psychiatric Graduates and 4 have been 
advanced to similar positions in other hospitals by transfer. Seven in the junior 
class successfully passed the examination. There were 21 enrolled in the junior 
class beginning in September practically all of whom are graduates of high school. 

Treatment 

Diversified occupations have been continued as a major part of the institutional 
regime on prescription by physicians under the direction of occupational therapists 
as in former years. All treatments, whether by occupational therapy or other 
methods are under the direct order of the attending physician and directed for 
the benefit of each individual patient, both as a curative measure in particularly 
in the earlier cases admitted, and as a purposeful occupation aiding in the eco- 
nomic conduct of the hospital. As previously outlined, occupational therapy is 
not only well recognized as a curative agent where improvement or recovery is 
possible, but also in the continued care cases where a contented and normal daily 
life in the hospital is important. 

Occupational therapy is usually defined as : "Any mental or physical activity 
prescribed and guided for the purpose of contributing to and hastening recovery 
from the effect of disease or injury." It is recognized as a medical function directed 
by occupational therapists under medical supervision as is any treatment used in 
behalf of the patients and supervised by trained workers. In a mental hospital 
where a considerable proportion of the population is of the continued care type, 
"something to do," is of great importance, both from the physical and mental 
side to ease the mind and nerves of the patient aiding, if not in mental recovery, 
perhaps in the prevention of deterioration but regulated in accordance with the 
needs of the individual and the economic conduct of the institution. Practical 
occupational therapy in a hospital such as ours is so organized that it includes 
diversional occupation for the acute and curable and also those normalizing ac- 
tivities necessary for a larger group in whom recovery from mental illness cannot 
be brought about. 

We have well equipped occupational and industrial therapy rooms and work 
shops providing an opportunity for diversified therapy and constructive occupa- 
tion. An additional room, formerly occupied by the printing department has been 
provided for the accommodation of 50 women in which room plain sewing, mend- 
ing and the manufacture of wearing apparel is done thus relieving the over crowd- 
ing in our occupational therapy building for women. The occupational therapy 
building has been so fully occupied that it is not possible there to include all those 
who need this treatment so that classes in the afternoon have been continued in 
the hospital and treatment buildings under the immediate supervision of the 
occupational therapy department. 



P.D. 70 



9 



Hydrotherapy 

The methods of treatment employed are: the continuous bath, wet sheet envelop- 
ment, colonic irrigation, cabinet and tonic baths. All are under the immediate 
direction of the medical staff and trained hydrotherapists. 3,151 continuous baths 
were administered. The wet sheet envelopment is used in a very limited way and 
was used in only 13 cases during the year. During the year 2,071 colonic irri- 
gations were given. This method of treatment is one of the most important in 
use. It is a method of treatment especially mentioned by recovered patients as 
the one that did the most for them. This form of treatment having been carried 
on here for several years impresses us more and more as to its value in both, mental 
and physical conditions. It is, however, a treatment that to be effective must be 
under medical direction and carried out by trained hydrotherapists. Tonic treat- 
ment with its combinations of salt glow, saline baths, fan douches, and needle 
spray, has been given in 1,591 cases. It has been of particular benefit in selected 
cases. 

Physical-therapy: The physical-therapy department has been active through- 
out the year filling prescriptions of the attending physician thru a trained operator. 
5,672 treatments have been administered as follows: infra red, 1,950; ultra violet, 
a. c, 1,395; ultra violet, w.c, 848; high frequency, 714; Morse wave, 599; mas- 
sage, 8S. The value of this treatment in physicial conditions has been demon- 
strated to a greater degree than in the treatment of mental conditions. 

Personal Hygiene: This department was established several years ago primarily 
for the encouragement of a tidy personal appearance. 11,310 treatments have 
been given this year. As all people everywhere feel better if their personal ap- 
pearance is satisfactory, so it is with many of the mentally ill. A better personal 
hygiene is a normalizing influence the importance of which is too much neglected. 

All treatment whether directed toward the improvement of mental or physical 
conditions has been under the immediate direction of a physician. No one method 
of treatment can be pointed out as suitable in all cases. Our facilities for treat- 
ment are such that the physician has at his disposal a very varied armamentarium. 

Maintenance 

By legislative enactment there was appropriated for general operating expenses, 
including unusual repairs and improvements, $425,197.19 in which was included 

1932 liabilities amounting to $11,397.19. There has been expended for main- 
tenance $400,942.77 permitting a return to the State Treasury of $24,248.42. 

Because of the depressed condition of the country, every effort has been made 
to reduce expenses. There has been a daily average of 1,394.958 patients. The 
gross per capita cost has been $5.53 per week compared with $6.08 the previous 
year and $6.76 per week in 1931. This was a reduction of 9% in expenses in 

1933 and a 10^ reduction the prior year, a reduction of 119^. 

While the most pronounced reduction was made in personal service, a reduction 
was made under all headings of the appropriation with the exception of coal 
purchased. Here is noted an increase of $.23 per week per patient. This is be- 
cause of the fact that we not only paid for coal to the amount of $9,554.47 but 
we also purchased all coal for the winter months ending March 1934. 



The estimated budget for 1934 is as follows: 

Personal services $221,330 

Religious instruction 1,711 

Travel, transportation and office expense 5,146 

Food 80,140 

Clothing and materials 17,238 

Furnishings and household supplies 24,206 

Medical and general care 29,868 

Heat and other plant operations 49,009 

Farm 43,595 

Garage and grounds 6,290 

Repairs ordinary 12,200 

Repairs and renewals 12,825 



Total $503,558 



10 



P.D. 70 



This budget prepared before the end of the fiscal year is necessarily larger 
than will eventually be appropriated or will be actually needed as all anticipated 
purchases must be incorporated in the budget presented. It is hoped that the 
appropriation for 1934 will not be reduced below that of 1933 as this cannot be 
well done without impairment of the service. 

Special Appropriations 
There were no appropriations made available for special construction in 1933. 
Some construction was pro\dded for by appropriations of previous years and this 
was continued and completed as follows: 

1. Xeu- heating plant including equipment. This was done under contract and 
the plant was in operation at the end of 1932 and completed in the early part 
of 1933. 

2. Coal trestle. This was completed and in operation at the end of 1932 
except for ditching and draining of coal pocket which was completed in 1933. 

3. Employees cottage. An appropriation of $14,000 was made in 1931 per- 
mitting the erection of a fireproof cottage for 15 employees known as Juniper 
Cottage. This was constructed under our super\ision without contract and was 
occupied in July, 1933. 

4. Furnishings-hospital building. This work has been completed. 

5. Seivage disposal. An appropriation of $12,850 provided for a sewage dis- 
posal plant at the Westminster Cottages and a filtration plant near the Highland 
Cottage. These beds were constructed by our own labor and are now completed 
and in use. This will care for the sewage from ten buildings in which patients 
and employees are housed. 

Repairs not Recurring Annually 

1. Changes in Women's Hospital Building. The tonic treatment equipment 
has been removed to the Women's Treatment Building. A dental room with 
laboratory connecting has been provided in the space vacated. The room formerly 
occupied by the dentist has been converted into a laundry and ironing room. A 
room formerly used as a waiting room has been converted into a stock room for 
the dispensary. 

At the Men's Hospital Building a serving room has been provided on each 
floor and a dumb waiter for food service installed. 

2. Transformers — dairy barn. Two transformers have been installed which 
will deliver a 220 volt service for the operation of motors. 

3. Re-building road to hospital. A stone road with tar^-ia surface, area 2,677 
sq. yds. has been constructed and completed from a point near the office to and 
including the 4 hospital buildings. 

4. Gardner Cottages. Connecting 2 ward buildings and service buildings at 
Gardner Cottages and a new steam line. Subways permitting the passage of 
patients between buildings have been constructed and new steam lines and re- 
turns installed. 

5. Painting standpipe. The water storage tank has been thoroughly cleaned 
and painted both inside and out. The cement foundation was found to be crumbl- 
ing and this has been renewed. It is now in first class condition and should require 
no further repairs for a number of years. 

6. Range burner equipment. Oil burners with an outside storage tank and 
pump have been installed at the main kitchen. 

Renewals for 1934 
In the budget for maintenance is included the sum of $12,825 for repairs and 
renewals, not occurring annually. This request is divided as follows: 1 — $6,700 
for fire protection divided as follows: sprinklers, $2,550; fire escapes, $1,100; re- 
wiring, $1,850; hydrants, $400; standpipe and hose, $500; fire-proof ceiling at 
blacksmith Shop, $100; removal of fire alarm system to new power house, $200. 

2 — Tunnel and steam connection at Monadnock and Watatic Cottages, S400. 

3 — Portable centrifugal pump, $250. 4 — Steam driven tube cleaner, $275. 5 — X-ray 
fluroscopic unit, $1,000. 7 — Installation of oil burners at the Bakery, $200. 
8 — Patients' enclosure, rear of Women's Treatment Building, $3,000. 



P.D. 70 



11 



Future Needs 

In addition to the needs specified above the following have been presented for 
. consideration, at such time as money is available: 

Additional equipment in laundry, $1500. Construction of road leading from the 
I Colony, $2,488. New ovens for bakery, $8,000. Vegetable preparation room, 
I $3,858. Additions and changes in main kitchen, $9,200. Re-building road, $2,900. 
! Construction of two pottery kilns, $3,000. Superintendent's house, $20,000. 
Building on top of vegetable cellar, $7,850. Filter beds at Valley Group, $7,875. 
Electric refrigerators at colonies, $2,000. 

These are all needed additions and improvements and we are hopeful that pro- 
\isions may be made for them in the near future. 

Ci^t:l Works Admixistratiox 
One project consisting of ditching and draining of lowland is underway. This is 
extensive ditching of lowland that 60 acres of land may be brought under culti- 
vation. Work is provided for 100 unemployed men of Gardner and is progressing 
satisfactorily. 

Public Works Admixistratiox 
Pursuant to a request that the Department of Mental Diseases submit ten- 
tative plans for new construction to be done under appropriations made by the 
Federal and State Governments, the following list of projects was submitted to- 
gether with plans and specifications. 

1. Storehouse with cold storage facilities. This is badly needed as no suitable 
storeroom exists at present. It will also provide a cold storage plant and the 
manufacture of ice which is now purchased. 

2. Changes iii electrical equipment to centralize the generating of electricity and 
the distribution of it at the new heating plant. 

3. CoiL' barn. To provide for the housing of 50 cows. 

4. Hay barn. To provide a central hay and feed barn that all farm feed may 
be centralized and properly controlled. 

5. Domestic and dormitory building at Valley Farm. A 2 story building to pro- 
vide a central kitchen and dining room with living and sleeping accommodations 
for 50 additional patients. 

6. A building for the acute and curable. This has been requested previously, 
that suitable provision may be made for the reception of acute cases of mental 
illness. This would also be provided with enlarged facilities for more intensive 
study of mental conditions and facilities for their treatment. 

7. Textile building. This would permit the removal of textile and other in- 
dustries from the printery providing additional space needed at the printery. 

8. Enlargement of the Assembly Building. This would provide facilities for 
diversion and recreation for patients and employees. 

Farm 

The general operations of the farm have been continued as in past years offering 
desirable occupation for patients and providing all vegetables, milk, poultry, etc., 
needed for table use. 319 acres of land were under actual cultivation. Of this 
acreage, 149 acres were hay; 170 general farm crops. The total money outlay 
on the farm was $126,612.90 and credits from farm amounted to $162,235.84. 
The profit from all farm operations was $35,801.78. All farm costs and credits 
are computed on the basis of standard unit prices prescribed in state accounting. 
The largest single crop was that of potatoes, 6,213 bus. All crops were bounteous 
and it was possible to supply other hospitals with 600 bus. of potatoes from the 
1932 crop and 900 bus. of carrots from the 1933 crop. There are available at 
the present time for other hospitals, 400 bus. carrots, 180 bus. turnips, 135 bus. 
of other vegetables. Having this supply of vegetables has permitted us to supply 
each patient with 16.7 ounces of farm vegetables compared with 16.45 ounces in 
1932. Over 50 of food consumed has been produced on the farm. 

Cannery. All excess summer vegetables were sent to the cannery daily and 
there canned for winter use. 17,953 gals, were canned. 6,618 qts. of vegetables 
were preserved at the various cottage kitchens, also seven bbls. of cucumbers, 



12 



P.D. 70 



piccalilli and sauerkraut. Our canning operations and storage of canned goods 
each year are based on the possibility that the following year we may not pro- 
duce as good a crop in which event we would not be without a supply of vegetables. 

The dairy herd for the seventh consecutive year is found to be tubercular free. 
Contagious abortion has been controlled, there being one case only this year. 
There has been very little mastitis. Our cows are tested monthly for this and 
reactors are removed from the main herd and treated. It has been under good 
control and is lessening each year. The total milk yield was 890,573 lbs. produced 
at a total cost of $.02314 per pound which is equivalent to $.0475 per qt. The 
average production per cow for the entire herd was 15,240 lbs. with a butter fat 
test of 3.7%. In addition to milk there was produced: 21,602 lbs. of meat. The 
total cost of operating the dairy was $20,743.25. The total dairy production was 
$40,428.96. There was a loss in inventory due to the removal of animals from 
the herd amounting to $1,687.86. The net gain of the dairy operations was 
$17,997.85. The loss of young stock in the pasture reported in the past two 
years was prevented this year by removing them from the pasture during July 
and August. A yearling bull from the Carnation Farms, Seattle, Washington, 
was purchased and should materially assist in building up the herd of the future. 

The total cost of operating the swine herd was $6,851.07; the total credits 
$5,042.44, showing a loss of $1,808.63 of which $843.89 is a reduction in inventory. 
There was produced 55,739 lbs. of pork for which a credit was received of $.08 per 
lb. The loss shown in this department is due largely to excessive loss of young 
pigs. 

Poultry: 2,000 day old chicks were purchased in March. Poultry debits were 
$3,504.42, credits $5,458.48. There were 7,839 lbs. of meat produced: 9,317 doz. 
of eggs. The average production per hen was 191.7. Included in meat pro- 
duced is that of turkeys, geese, ducks, guinea hens and rabbits which supplied 
us with all poultry needed. 

Miscellaneous: 93,598 ft. of lumber has been cut and sawed at the saw mill 
as follows: pine, 70,000 ft., spruce, 7,200 ft., hemlock, 7,200 ft., maple, 3,200 ft., 
ash, 3,063 ft., oak, 3,003 ft. The total value of this is $6,279.82. 440 cds. of wood 
for kitchen use was cut; 200 fence stakes, 600 fence posts, 2,000 tons of ice har- 
vested; 197 lbs. of honey produced. 

There have been 1600 tons of stone excavated; 1,065 tons of rock removed 
from fields; 375 tons were crushed at the stone crusher for building and road 
construction; 930 sq. yds. of road were re-built; 11,653 sq. yds. of road were re- 
finished; 142 sq. yds. of walk repaired; 60,720 cu. yds. of earth excavated; 17,040 
sq. yds. of grading completed; 40 acres of land cleared of underbrush; 5^ acres 
of land cleared for fields. 

Reforesting work has been continued and we have set out 7,500 pine seedlings 
and 7,500 spruce seedlings continuing the program of recent years. 71 apple trees, 
81 peach trees; 20 pear trees have been added as well as 5,400 strawberry plants; 
200 raspberry and 200 blackberry plants. 

Mr. George A. Marshall, Trustee, donated approximately 2400 bus. of apples 
from his apple farm. Of these 676 gals, were canned at the cannery and 600 gals, 
of cider made for vinegar, the balance gave all patients a bounteous supply of 
apples during the fall months. 

Our many friends have been generous in their contribution of magazines, news- 
papers, material for arts and crafts work, annual subscriptions of current maga- 
zines, entertainment furnished, etc., etc. These gifts are fully appreciated. The 
number of our friends who have assisted is so large that I am not submitting a 
detailed list of them. I may only say that their assistance has been fully appre- 
ciated. There is no measure that I can suggest which can adequately express the 
help they have been to our people. 

To the officers of the colony I wish to express my full appreciation of their 
efforts, ever willing not only to do the work assigned them but assisting in main- 
taining a high standard for the hospital. Success or failure depends upon this 
cooperation. 



P.D. 70 



13 



To you the members of the Board of Trustees I wish to express my deep appreci- 
ation of your help and support and for that willingness to individually give of 
your time and the benefit of your wide experience at all times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 

Productiox for 1933 
Industrial Department — Women: Clothing articles, manufactured, 20,711; 
household articles, manufactured, 14,576; table linen manufactured, 237; sheets, 
pillow slips, blankets, etc., 3,116; luncheon cloths, covers, etc., 61; material dyed 
for occupational therapy department: Articles, 95; Pounds, 1,795; Articles re- 
paired, 14,709. Value of articles produced, $8,732.31. 

Textile Department — Yards of cloth woven: Gingham 5,017; ticking, 1,780; 
denim, 4,797; shirting, 3,056; sheeting, 7/4 5,389; sheeting 4/4, 5,939; strong 
cloth, 2,088: towelling, 2,237; underwear material, 1,200; miscellaneous, 268; 
Brushes, brooms, mats, 1,332; Mattresses and pillows, 15. Articles repaired, 9,033. 
Value of articles produced, $5,799.18. 

Tailor Shop (Pieces): — Men's clothing, 1,679; cut and assembled for women's 
apparel, 6,556; articles repaired, 4,470. Value of articles produced, $3,223.79. 

Shoe Shop (Pairs): — Men's shoes, 997; women's shoes, 199; shoes, repaired, 1,095; 
shoes, rebuilt, 43; other leather work, 41 pieces. Value of articles produced, 
$2,270.41. 

Furniture Department (Pieces) — Manufactured, 150; repaired, 2,647; small 
articles, 5,800. Value of articles produced, $495.93. 

Printery (Department of Mental Diseases) — Annual reports printed (18), 
11,737; bulletins and reprints (5), 35,300; Christmas folders, 37,450; envelopes, 
38,000; labels, 21,700; payroll checks, 107,300; standard forms— 3,508,480; 
Pounds of type used, 8,520; number of impressions required, 4,274,799; pounds 
of printed matter shipped, 41,024. 



Land, 1856 acres. 
Buildings 



VALUATION 

November 30, 1933 
Real Estate 



$41,125.00 
1,499,302.25 



Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Medical and general care . 
Heat and other plant operation 

Farm 

Garage and grounds .... 
Repairs 



Real estate . 
Personal property 



Personal Property 



Sum:.l\ry 



$1,540,427.25 

S300.00 
13,235.68 
22,255.36 
254.366.75 
5.075.69 
15.306.85 
64.327.41 
12.162.97 
21,902.86 

$408,933.57 

$1,540,427.25 
408.933.57 

$1,949,360.82 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1933. 

Statement of Earnings 

Board of patients $30,439.89 

Personal services: — 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 150.71 

Sales:— 

Travel, transportation and office expenses $19. 27 

Food 1,982.88 

Clothing and materials 76.85 

Furniture and household supplies 2.03 

Medical and general care 105 . 29 



14 



P.D. 70 



Heat and other plant operation 

Repairs ordinary . 

Arts and crafts sales 

Farm 



Total sales 
Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances 
Rents .... 
Post office 
B. & M. side track. 



Total, miscellaneou-s 
Total earnings for the year 

Maintenance Appropriation 
Balance from previous year, brought forward 
Appropriation, current year 

Total 

E.xpenditures as follows: 

1. Personal services 

Food 

Medical and general care 

Religious instruction 

Farm . . . . . 
Heat and other plant operation 
Travel, transportation and office expenses 
Garage and grounds .... 
Clothing and materials .... 
Furnishings and household supplies . 

Repairs ordinary 

Repairs and renewals .... 



2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 



Total maintenance expenditures . . . . 
Balance of maintenance appropriation, Nov. 30, 1933 



13.20 
129.35 
647.56 
571.95 



$3,548.38 



$504.99 
562.62 
165.00 
358.00 



1.590.61 
$35,729.59 



$11.197. 19 
414,000.00 



$425,197.19 



$212,383.09 
43,126.67 
24.400.38 

1,338.50 
24,111.26 
51.346.52 

3.587.46 

3.202.40 
10,436.20 
13,812. 13 
10,542.74 

2,655.42 



$400,942.77 
24.254.42 



Special Appropriations 

Balance December 1, 1932, brought forward $29,236.87 

Appropriations for current year - 

Total $29,236.87 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $24,513.46 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth - 

(Star balances below that are reverting) 284.54 

24, 798 . 00 



Balance November 30, 1933, carried to next year $4,438.87 



Appropriation 


Act of 
1931 


Total 
Amount 
Appropri- 
ated 


Expended 

during 
FiscalYear 


Total 
Expended 
to Date 


Balance 
at end 
of Year 


Furnishing hospital building . 

Coal trestle 

Employees' cottage, 1931 
Additional sewage disposal . 
New heating plant equipment 


Chap. 245 
Chap. 245 
Chap. 245 
Chap. 245 
Chap. 269 


$9,300.00 
10,000.00 
14,000.00 
12,250.00 
150,000.00 


$587.85 
264.00 
4,082.61 
5,749.15 
13,829.85 


$9,280.32 
9,829.00 
13,913.41 
12,242.73 
145,561.13 


$19.68* 
171.00* 
86.59* 
7.27* 
4,438.87 






$195,550.00 


$24,513.46 


$190,826.59 


4,723.41 



Per Capita 

During the year the average number of patients has been 1,393.772. 
Total cost of maintenance, $400,942.77. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of (52 weeks to year) $5.5320. 
Total receipts for the year, $35,729.59. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.4929. 

Total net cost of maintenance for year (Total maintenance less total receipts) $365,213.18. 
Net weekly per capita, $5.0391. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Gerteude W. Perry, 

Treasurer. 



P.D. 70 15 

STATISTICAL TABLES 

As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 

Table 1. General Information 

Data correct at end of hospital year November 30, 1933 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant: 

Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings $1,540,427.25 

Personal property 408,933.57 

Total $1,949,360.82 

Total acreage of hospital property owned, 1,856. 

Total acreage under cultivation during previous year, 322.25. 

4. Officers and employees: 

Actually in Ser\'ice Vacancies at End 

at End of Year of Year 

M. 

Clinical assistants - - - 1 - 1 

Total physicians 7 1 8 1 - 1 

Stewards 
Resident dentists 
Pharmacists . 
Graduate nurses 

Other nurses and attendants .... 66 59 125 7 3 10 

Occupational therapists 
Social workers 

All other officers and employees . ... 53 38 91 3 5 8 

Total officers and employees . .129 113 242 11 8 19 

Note: — The following items, 5 — 10 inclusive, are for the year ended September 30, 1933. 

5. Census of patient population at end of year: 

Absent from Hospital 
Actually in Hospital but Still on Books 

White: M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Insane 722 502 1.224 51 106 157 

Mental defectives 29 17 46 4 9 13 

All other cases 1 - 1 2 - 2 

Total 752 519 1,271 57 115 172 

Other Races 

Insane 23 9 32 

Mental defectives 1 - 1 - - - 

Total 24 9 33 

Grand Total 776 528 1.304 57 115 172 

M. F. T. 

6. Patients under treatment in occupational-therapy classes, includ- 

ing physical training, on date of report .... 30 167 197 

7. Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of 

report 496 121 617 

8. Average daily number of all patients actually in hospital during 

year 779.316 538.031 1317.347 

9. Voluntary patients admitted during year .... 3 8 11 
10. Persons given advice or treatment in out-patient clinics during 

year 310 159 469 

Table 2. Financial Statement 
See Treasurer's report for data requested under this table. 



M. 


F. 


T. 


1 




1 


6 


1 


7 


7 


1 


8 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 




7 


7 


66 


59 


125 




5 


5 




3 


3 


53 


38 


91 


129 


113 


242 



IG 



P.D. 70 



o b 



3 c 



I vO I I >0 O I 



I I I f><<S 
»hO I -^OO 

^ « I fS ts 



00 



0«N 




1) o 

'•B 2 



£3- C.a 

o o rt ?5 



£ c3 S ^ c £f ^ 
is 4; 2 £i o 



5 ctf 



P.D. 70 17 



Table 4. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 











Parents of Male 


Parents of Female 




Patients 




Patients 






Patients 




Nativity 




















































Both 






tJotn 




M. 


F. 


T. 


Fathers 


Mothers Parents 


Fathers 


Mothers 


Parents 




27 


23 


50 


12 


17 


12 


17 


17 


16 


Canadai 


3 


4 


7 


8 


4 


4 


6 


5 


5 


England 




J 
















Finland 


4 


4 


8 


5 


5 


5 


6 


< 
o 




Ireland 


1 


2 


3 


5 


5 


4 


2 


3 


2 


Italy 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


Sweden 








2 


2 


2 








Other countries .... 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 




1 


Unascertained .... 








2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


Total 


38 


37 


75 


38 


38 


32 


37 


37 


35 



Include* Newfoundland. 



18 



P.D. 70 



f»3ui— I ^^^^ I ^ 



Tj< CS I »- CN 



C « 
D 



I I 



I CN <*5 I -^f»5 00 



!5 ° 
Sr'oJajtncocotncDoiajtn tn^ 

>>>.>.>>>,>.>.>.>.>.>." 



P.D. 70 



19 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions 

Males Females Total 

Citizens by birth 27 23 50 

Citizens by naturalization 7 3 10 

Aliens 3 10 13 

Citizenship unascertained 1 1 2 

Total 38 37 75 

^ Table 6. Psychoses of First Admissions 



Psychoses 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic psychoses ........... 














2. 


Senile psychoses 








6 


7 


13 


3. 


Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis 








5 


5 


10 


4. 


General paralysis 








1 


1 


2 


5. 


Psychoses with cerebral syphilis ......... 








— 


- 


— 


6. 


Psychoses with Huntington's chorea 








— 


— 


— 


7. 
8. 


Psychoses with brain tumor .......... 

Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases, total .... 

Multiple sclerosis 

Other diseases 


— 
3 


" i" 

2 


. . . . 

5 


- 
3 


- 
3 


- 

6 


9. 


Alcoholic psychoses, other types, acute or chronic 








2 




2 


10. 


Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins 










- 




11. 


Psychoses with pellagra 














12. 


Psychoses with other somatic diseases, total ...... 

Exhaustion delirium 

Cardio-renal diseases 

Other diseases or conditions 


1 
1 


1 

2 


1 

1 

3 


2 


3 


5 


13. 


Manic-depressive psychoses, total 

Manic type 

Depressive type 




"2 
2 


"2 
2 




4 


4 


14. 


Involution melancholia 








2 


2 


4 


15. 


Dementia praecox (schizophrenia) 








7 


5 


12 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 








1 


1 


2 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 








2 


1 


3 


18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses, Hysterical type 

Psychoses with psychopathic personality 










1 


1 


19. 














20. 


Psychoses with mental deficiency 








4 


4 


8 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 














22. 


Without psychosis, total 

Psychopathic personality without psychosis 

Mental deficiency without psychosis 


. . . . 

2 




' i 

2 


3 




3 




Total 




38 


37 


75 



Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified ivith Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Race 



Total 



Senile 



With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerosis 



General 
paralysis 



With other 
brain or 
nervous 
diseases 



English . 
Finnish. 
French . 
Irish 
Italian 1 
Lithuanian . 
Scandinavian 2 
Mixed . 

Race unascertained 
Total . 



M. 



1 3 4 

1 - 1 

1 1 

1 1 2 



F. T. 

4 6 



M. F. T. 
1 1 



M. F. T. 



1 - 1 
1 1 



1 - 1 
1 1 



1 1 



38 



37 



^Includes "North" and' 'South." 



^Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



20 



P.D. 70 



Table 7, Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 



Race 


Alco^iolic 


With other 
somatic 
diseases 


Manic- 
depressive 


Involution 
melancholia 


Dementia 
praecox 


English 

Finnish 

French 

Irish ...... 

Italian I 

Lithuanian 

Scandinavian 2 .... 

Mixed 

Race unascertained 


M. F. T. 
1 - 1 

1 - 1 


M. F. T. 

- 1 1 

- 2 2 
1 - 1 
1 - 1 


^I. F. T. 

- 1 1 
1 1 

1 1 

1 1 


M. F. T. 

- 1 1 

1 — 1 
1 - 1 

1 1 


M. F. T. 

- 1 1 
1 - 1 

1 1 
112 

- 2 2 

1 - 1 

4-4 


2-2 


2 3 5 


- 4 4 


2 2 4 


7 5 12 


Table 7. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 


Race 


Paranoia 

and 
paranoid 
conditions 


Epileptic 
psychoses 


Psycho- 
neuroses 

and 
neuroses 


With mental 
deficiency 


Without 
psychoses 


Finnish 

Scandinavian 2 .... 

Mixed 

Race unascertained 


M. F. T. 
1 1 

1 - 1 


M. F. T. 
1 - 1 
1 1 

1 - 1 


M. F. T. 
1 1 


M. F. T. 

1 1 

2 1 3 
1 2 3 

1 - 1 


M. F. T. 
1 - 1 

2-2 


1 1 2 


2 1 3 


- 1 1 


4 4 8 


3-3 



ilncludes "North" and "South". 
^Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 













Under 15 




15-19 






20-24 






Psychoses 




To 


tal 


years 




years 






years 








M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 
























2. 


Senile 


6 


7 


13 
















3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 


5 


5 


10 
















4. 


General paralysis 


1 


1 


2 






1 


1 








5. 


With cerebral syphilis 






















6. 


With Huntington's chorea 






















7. 


With brain tumor 






















8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases . 


3 


3 


6 
















9. 


Alcoholic 


2 




2 
















10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins . 






















11. 
























12. 


With other somatic diseases 


2 


3 


5 
















13. 






4 


4 
















14. 


Involution melancholia .... 


2 


2 


4 
















15. 






5 


12 






1 


1 


2 




2 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 


1 


1 


2 
















17. 


Epileptic psychoses 


2 


1 


3 




1 




1 








18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses . 




1 


1 












1 


1 


19. 


With psychopathic personality 




















1 


20. 


With mental deficiency .... 


4 


4 


8 


- 1 1 








1 




21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses .... 






- 
















22. 




3 




3 










1 




1 






38 


37 


75 


1 1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


5 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified ivith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 



Psychoses 


25-29 
years 


30-34 
years 


35-39 
years 


40-44 
years 


45-49 
years 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 
































2. 


Senile 
































3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


























1 


— 


1 


4. 


General paralysis . 


1 




1 


























5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 
































7. 


With Huntington s chorea . 
































7. 


With brain tumor. 
































8. 


With other brain or ner%-ous 


































diseases .... 


~ 








1 


1 








2 




2 








9. 


Alcoholic .... 
































10. 


Due to drugs and other exo- 


































genous toxins 
































11. 


With pellagra 
































12. 


With other somatic diseases. 














I 




1 


1 


- 


1 








13. 


Manic-depressive . 


- 


1 


1 




1 


1 




2 


2 














1*. 


Involution melancholia 






























2 


15. 


Dementia praecox 


3 


1 


4 


1 


3 


4 


1 




1 














16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 


































ditions .... 








1 




1 


















1 


17. 


Epileptic psychoses 




1 


1 








1 




1 














18. 


Psycho neuroses and neuroses 
































19. 


With psychopathic person- 


































ality 
































20. 


With mental deficiency 




2 


2 














1 




1 








21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 
































22. 


Without psychosis 




















1 




1 


1 




1 




Total .... 


4 


5 


9 


2 


5 




3 


2 


5 


5 




5 


3 


2 


5 



Table 8. Age of First Admissions Classified ivith Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 









50-54 




55-59 






60H54 






65-69 


70 years 




Psychoses 




years 




years 






years 






years 


and over 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 


M. F. T. 


1. 


Traumatic .... 
























2. 


Senile 














2 


2 


3 


- 3 


3 5 8 


3. 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 




1 


1 
















4 4 8 


4. 


General paralysis . 
























5. 


With cerebral syphilis . 
























6. 


With Huntington's chorea . 


























With brain tumor 
























8'. 


With other brain or nervous 


























diseases .... 








2 


2 












1 - 1 


9. 


























10. 


Due to drugs and other exo- 


























genous toxins 
























11. 


With pella&ra 
























12. 


With other somatic diseases 




1 


1 














1 1 


1 1 


13. 


Manic-depressive . 
























14. 


Involution melancholia 


1 




1 








1 


1 








15. 


Dementia praecox 
























16. 


Paranoia and paranoid con- 


























ditions .... 
























17. 


Epileptic psychoses 
























18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 
























19. 


With psychopathic person- 


























ality 
























20. 


With mental deficiency 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 




1 








21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 
























22. 


Without psj-chosis 


























Total 


4 


2 


6 


- 3 


3 


1 


3 


4 


3 


1 4 


8 10 18 



22 



P.D. 70 



11 



CN CS I I I SO (N -H 

I I I fN I (M ^ I 



•a c; 



I I 



0<N I I UT* fS CS 



'T <N 1/1 r-l ^ »-< 



CN I I Pvl I CN t-- »H <N I 



X! w O 
b m >> O C.5 

2 2 .5 ^ 

J2 J= j3 



O Q 



i" ^ "> 



w _ O. C o 

, y X 2 ^ S-^y^ S 
iiS V, S.^ 4^ S 2 



is r, 5.^ M M 2 X 



o o a o 

O OJ 



5^5 S5f 55o a;5£c o a s^-S55^:S 



11 

o ^ 



o 



>- X! 

«j a <u S 5i 
(J 2 cjSj2 o 
3 — j3 ujssijsji 



Tt> Tt (N ^ 



tN uo ^ ^ 



CS I cs ■rt I 



"5 

.a 

a) o S"^ 

03 CO o C 

M to t> ^ 

3 a c. c 
_™ T) y *j ^ • - 

O o GO 



o — 

O C 
C 03 T3 ,, OJ y 

X! 2 » S-^'^"-- 



24 



p.D. : 



Table 11. Economic Condiiion, of Fi 

to Pr i 





PSVLBOSES 












Maisinal 












L 


Ttanmaltic . . . . 






r - 


i . 
















- ■ 


2. 


^nile 




6 


7 


13 


1 


3 








_ 


1 






With cerebral arterjoorteros 


IS . 


5 


5 


10 


a 

■3 








\ 


1 


- 




4. 


Geneial paralysis 




1 


1 


2 




1 


; 
1 


7 
1 




1 






5. 


With corebraJ syp!a^!-? 


























6. 


With Hmmttimr: : r ^ ; 




— 


— 


— 


















7. 


Wiitli bram t-;— : r 


























& 


Witliodhei-teri- - ; : 




3 


3 


6 


3 




: 






; 


_ 


3 1 


9. 


Alcoholic 


- 


2 




2 
















1 


IOL 


M^%MC UK — ^. ^ - . - 












_ 














11. 


WiltJi i>d!!aEri 


- 
























12- 


W~: - 




2 


5 


i 








1 


2 






1 2 


13. 








4 


4 




1 


1 




3 


\ 






If 




- 


2 


2 


4 








2 


2 














7 


5 


12 


2 




3 






e 




1 1 








1 


1 


2 


1 














1 1 








2 


1 


3 






1 




















1 




















2i. 






4 






2 


1 


i 












22. 






3 





























Table 12. V : A " 5 Classified wifr . . 

































F. 


T. 




F. 


T. 












T. 










7 


13 


2 


7 


9 












1 










5 


10 




5 


6 
























2 




1 


1 












1 


5- 






























6. 


































































i 


! 


6 




3 


4 
























2 


















































ii 


wi lE :: £^%; r_i : 




2 


3 


5 


1 


3 


4 














1?. 








4 


4 




4 


4 




















2 


2 


4 


1 


2 


3 


1 




1 














7 


5 


12 


7 


4 


11 




1 
















1 

2 


1 
1 


2 
3 


2 


1 


2 
3 




















4 


1 

4 


1 

8 


1 


1 

3 


1 

4 


1 






1 






Tottal . . 




3 




3 


2 




2 


- 








38 


37 

















H 














vorc 




1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 








5 







1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


, 




1 


ted 
















jpara 






1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 




C/3 


;^ 


,,,,, 


, , , , 





■ 




1 






1 vC* 1 1 


.1.1 


1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 
























Wide 




1 •^rc 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






o\ 


ied 




1 (N 1 


1 •<* 1 1 


1 rr, « (N CN ^ 1 






CN 


Marri 






1 tN 1 1 




1 fN 




fO 




1 ^ «S 1 


1 <N 1 1 


1 ^ 1 ^^^^ 1 






PO 


<u 




1 lO ^ 1 


1 <M tN 1 


1 »-( --H CN 0\ 1 (N »H 


1 


tN 


lO 


>ingl 




1 fV) tH 1 
















1 1 1 


1 — <N 1 


1 1 VO 1 -H 1 




(N 


CI 






1 O (N 1 


1 VO «N 1 


1 lO fN (N fO •H 


1 00 




JO 


c3 




1 lO 1-1 1 


1 <^ 1 1 


1 tN »0 ,^ »H 








O 

H , 
















i 


1 vOiO^ 1 


1 1 


1 fN 1 tN tS 1 




p^ 


00 



to 

T3 
C 
O 



a 



p c 

to 

O U (U 



2 c .ti g .ti .ti .ti 



•S u:: -o 1; S "O 
o o o ^ o cj 



0.2 oJ u >. 



II 

- -5 c «>■ c ? 
4J 03 a mSi^^S 



C^PO■^lO^O^»o6o^O-HC^rOT^^l0^6^^odo^c5•^tN 



26 



P.D. 70 



Table 14. Psychoses of Readmissions 

Psychoses Males Females Total 

1. Traumatic - - - 

2. Senile psychoses - - - 

3. Psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis ..- 1 1 

4. General paralysis - - - 

5. Psychoses with cerebral syphilis - - - 

6. Psychoses with Huntington's chorea - - - 

7. Psychoses with brain tumor - - - 



8. Psychoses with other brain or nervous diseases - 1 1 

9. Alcoholic psychoses ...1 - 1 

10. Psychoses due to drugs and other exogenous toxins - - - 

11. Psychoses with pellagra - - - 

12. Psychoses with other somatic diseases 1 - 1 

13. Manic-depressive psychoses 1 5 6 

14. Involution melancholia - 1 1 

15. Dementia praecox 4 1 5 

16. Paranoia and paranoid conditions - - - 

17. Epileptic psychoses - - - 

18. Psychoneuroses and neuroses - - - 

19. Psychoses with psychopathic personality - 1 1 

20. Psychoses with mental deficiency - - - 

21. Undiagnosed psychoses - - - 

22. Without psychosis 

Total 7 10 17 



Table 15. Discharges of Patients Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 

and Condition on Discharge 



Psychoses 




Total 




Improved 


Unimproved 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. T. 






















2. 


Senile 


















3. 




















4. 




















5. 




















6. 




















7. 




















8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


















9. 




2 




2 


2 




2 






10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins .... 


















11. 




















12. 






2 


2 




2 


2 






13. 




1 


6 


7 


1 


6 


7 






14. 






2 


2 




2 


2 






15. 




5 


3 


8 


5 


3 


8 






16. 






2 


2 




2 


2 






17. 






2 


2 




2 


2 






18. 






2 


2 




1 


1 




1 1 


19. 




1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 






20. 




2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


4 






21. 




















22. 




2 




2 
















13 


23 


36 


11 


22 


33 




1 1 



P.D. 70 



27 



Table 15a. Hospital Residence during this Admission of First Court Admissions 

Discharged during 1933 













Average Net 




Psychoses 




Number 




Hospital Residence 














in Years 








M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 




- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


— 


2. 




— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


— 


3. 




— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


— 


4. 




— 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5. 


With cerebral syphilis 


— 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6. 


With Huntington's chorea 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7. 


With brain tumor 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


_ 


8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


— 


- 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


9. 


Alcoholic 


2 


— 


2 


.5 


_ 


.5 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11. 




— 


- 


— 








12. 




- 


2 


2 




.7 


.7 


13. 




1 


5 


6 


.5 


1.9 


1.7 


14. 


Involution melancholia 










1.5 


1.5 


15. 


Dementia praecox 


3 


2 


5 


1.5 


.5 


1.1 


16. 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




2 


2 




1.0 


1.0 


1 7. 


Hpileptic psychoses ........ 














18. 






1 


1 




.5 


.5 


19. 


With psychopathic personality 




2 


2 




3.5 


3.5 


20. 






1 


1 




2.5 


2.5 


21. 
















22. 




1 




1 


1.5 




1.5 




Total 


7 


16 


23 


1.1 


1.5 


1.4 



28 



P.D. 70 



03 



.2 c 

0. GO 



£8 



S2 
OS 



IT) , 



-H lO -^-^ ^ 'H 



•2 O 
IP 



^ ^ m 



s 2 s 

u ^ 



^ ^ m 



> 5 S 



§ 03 



. o e 

I'm S 

6q S 



eo M c] ° 0) 

OOOO 



03 O <y 



s 

CO 



"^2 



is Sii 

<-» l^•-< 
o in •-< 



e 2 c ^ S o 



u, O 



■Si!' 



C C3 



.Si ai 



11? 

3 



P.D. 70 



29 



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>>— 




; r>.Si 1 1 


1 1 «M 1 1 — 1 


1 lO 1 1 


1 — 1 1 1 


o 


— 


t 1 1 1 

r 1 — 1 


1 1^1 1 « 1 

P f — f f 1 1 


1 ■* 1 1 

? — < ! 


1 — 1 1 1 

I 1 1. f 1 
















-'- 


^ X 














to - 




11—111 


1 1 1 i i 1 i 

f 1 1 c F • r 


i 1 1 1 

' r« I 1 


1 1 1 i 1 

1 ! I I 1 


r 


^ r 


_ 


_ 


_ - 


_ 


_ 




c ^■ 




1 1 1 1 1 




till 




i: 






I 1 — 1 1 1 




1 — 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 








- 


- 


- 




















V. ~ 




- 


- 


— 




_ 


■* m 




1 i — — 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 — 1 1 


1 — 1 1 1 






; ' — f 1 ( 


1 I 1 ) r I r 


r — f ! 


t 1 ( 1 1 




J: >■ 




- 






- 




^ X 








i . - i 










1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 — 1 


1 1- 1- 








- 








- 


? £ 








. - ; * 


' ' ~ ' ' 








f 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 — 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 




? >> 














^ X 




, t . - . . 








- 


^ >. 




1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 i 


1 






- 






- 




IS 1 




1 I 1 1 1 1 


I ! r 1 ' ■ ' 




« 1 ' r 1 1 


1 










- 




- 




















1 — 











5 I 
o I 



— X 



Jim X 

■s ■ ^ = r 

— M z - 

a «s - = - — 
s „ o 2 - - - = 



— f*; c" X C'' c — ^ •'5 ^ ac Ci> cJ — ri 



30 



P.D. 70 







1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , , 1 1 1 1 


1 1 "-i 1 




3-4 
years 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 ^ 1 _! 








1 <M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 








H 


1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 




1-2 , 
years 












i, 


l|IM|lll-H||||-,|l|| 


1 1 1 1 1 




8-12 
nonths 




1 — -H-H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 
. 1 . , < 


, 






1 '^^^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 








1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 




^ j:: 

1 c 

T}< O 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 




e 




I , , 1 , , , > , 1 , 1 , 1 < , , 


1 1 1 1 1 








|^P^l||l|||l|•rt||||| 


1 1 1 1 1 




1-3 
lonths 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 « 1 1 1 1 1 


, , , , , 




c 








<N 


;ss than 
month 




1 1 (N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 
, , , , , 


T*< 

(N 






J -H'^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


, , , , , 


(N 






lOvf^^tl^l |r-l(Nl 




^ 

in 


Tota 




IrOO^I 1 1 I'^l |-<CN|t^t-i| 


1 CN 1 


CS 






|vOt-fO-H| l^^l 1 |CN|tJ<| I 







o o 



o 



Si «> G c 

U, U >-, 



«l o S 

>-. CO (U g 



a o 



»-i CN ■<* lO O ' 



T3 OJ^ 
(- . 03 CO 

o P « 

o ho 

3 05 

O ^S.cS 
C m'O ,, <u^ 
X 0^ cH-^-g .2 

cfl_, ^ CO 0.__ u 



P.D. 70 



31 



2fe 

rt > 
<u O 



a aj 

"is o 



§5 = 

Sj2 O 



-J ^ — 

™ o "5 
CO I- CO UJ 



o o o i ■ 



2 oj c.y-n~ 2 
o 2 § 

'^J 03 is o^-ti O CO O 

a-' c.T> or "O o.^ 



c3 S. ^: 



32 



P.D. 70 



Table 19. Average Length of Hospital Stay during the Present Admission of All 
Cases in Residence on September 30, 1 933 















Average Length 




Psychoses 




Number 




of Residence 
















in Years 






M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


1. 


Traumatic 


4 


1 


5 


7 


25 


1 .50 


6. 10 


2. 


Senile 


16 


12 


28 


7 


55 


4.32 


6. 16 


3. 




11 


9 


20 


3 


67 


3.48 


3.58 


4. 




12 


5 


17 


3 


16 


8 . 10 


4.61 


5. 




1 


3 


4 


2 


50 


2.50 


2 .50 


6. 


With Huntington's chorea 


— 


2 


2 






2.50 


2. 50 


7. 




— 














8. 


With other brain or nervous diseases .... 


6 


4 


10 


2 


48 


.45 


1.67 


9. 


Alcoholic 


87 


6 


93 


10 


47 


13.33 


10.66 


10. 


Due to drugs and other exogenous toxins .... 


1 


1 


2 


17 


50 


22.50 


20.00 


11. 




— 














12. 




9 


7 


16 


6 


26 


2.78 


4.74 


13. 




29 


47 


76 


10 


60 


7. 72 


8.82 


14. 


Invol ution ruGls-Hc hoi is. 


10 


21 


31 


2 


29 


10.16 


7.62 


15.' 


Dementia praecox 


481 


316 


797 


13 


75 


11.39 


12.81 


16. 




11 


3 


14 


16 


04 


11.16 


15.00 


17. 




2 


1 


3 




45 


.45 


.45 


18. 


Psychoneuroses and neuroses 


2 


5 


7 


7 


50 


5.70 


6.21 


19. 


With psychopathic personality 




11 


11 






6.85 


6.85 


20. 




63 


57 


120 


8 


75 


7.30 


8.06 


21. 


Undiagnosed psychoses 
















22. 


Without psychoses 


31 


17 


48 


11 


60 


10.32 


11.14 




Total 


776 


528 


1,304 


12 


15 


10.02 


11.29 



Table 20. Family Care Department 



Males Females Total 

Remaining in Family Care, October 1932 6 72 78 

Admitted during the year - 43 43 

Whole number of cases within the year 6 115 121 

Dismissed within the year: 

Returned to the Institution 2 33 35 

On visit - 2 2 

On escape - 1 1 

Remaining in Family Care, September 30, 1933 4 79 83 

Supported by State 4 78 82 

Private - -' - 

Self-supporting - 1 1 

Number of different persons within the year 2 41 43 

Number of different persons within the year dismissed .... - 36 36 

Number of different persons within the year admitted .... 2 24 26 
Average daily number in Family Care during the year: 

Supported by State ..5.736 69.966 75.702 

Private ".- - - 

Self-supporting - .456 .456 



Public DocumeQt NoT^?^ 

= r> 

(Hammattiwpaltlf of Haaaarljuaptta 
ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



ass. Gardner State Colony 



FOR THE 

Year Ending November 30, 

1934 

Department of Mental Diseases 




PUBLICATIONf OF THIS DOCUMENT APPROVED BY THE COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

500. 7-'35. Order 4660. 



OCCUPATIONAL PRINTING PLANT 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL DISEASES 
GARDNER STATE HOSPITAL 
EAST SARDNER. MASS 



GARDN E^E §Td.TB36!OLON Y 

(Post Office Address: East Gardner, Mass.) 



Frederic A. Washburn, M.D., CmiTmaw^ Boston. 

Miss Grace Nichols, Secretary, Boston O*'!*"!'^^^ 

Owen A. Hoban, Gardner 

George A. Marshall, Fitchburg 

Fred N. Dillon, Fitchburg 

Mrs. Grace A. Brooks, Athol 

Frank W. Lyman, Ashby 

RESIDENT OFFICERS 
Charles E. Thompson, M.D., Superintendent 
Frederick P. Moore, M.D., Assistant Superintendent 
Harold K. Marshall, M.D., Senior Physician 
William A. Hunter, M.D., Senior Physician 
Lee W. Darrah, M.D., Assistant Physician 
Earl D. D orris, M.D., Assistant Physician 
Paul H. Wilcox, M.D., Assistant Physician 
Janet S. Barnes, M.D., Assistant Physician 
J. Herbert Maycock, D.M.D., Dentist 
Myron L. Marr, Steward 
Percy L. Strout, Head Farmer 
Gertrude W. Perry, Treasurer 
Hervey W. Bell, Engineer 
Elizabeth Friberg, Social Worker 

Mary Anne Chisholm, R.N., Principal of the School of Nursing 

DIRECTORS OF INDUSTRIES 
loNE Johnson, Supervisor of Industries for Women 
Harry E. Whitehouse, Supervisor of Weaving, Knitting, etc. 
Newton E. Smallwood, Supervisor of Shoemaking 
Carl Lindquist, Supervisor of Tailoring 
Anthony P. Bourgeois, Supervisor of Furniture Making ■ 
Elof R. Teir, Supervisor of Printing 

SUPERVISORS 
Viola Farnham, G.N., Women's Infirmary 
Alton J. Winchenbach, Men's Infirmary 
Ila W. Kennedy, G.N., Women's Hospital Building 
MoNA Bishop, G.N., Men's Hospital Building 
Elvira I. Winchenbach, G.N., Women's Treatment Building 
Daniel M. Campbell, Men's Treatment Building 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES 
Rev. James Fitzqibbons, Catholic Moses L. Sedar, Hebrew 

Local Pastors in Turn, Protestant 

TRUSTEES' REPORT 
To His Excellency, the Governor and the Honorable Council: 

The Trustees of the Gai'dner State Colony herewith present their thirty-second 
annual report. 

The report of the Superintendent to the Trustees is submitted herewith and 
made a part hereof by reference. In it will be found statistical tables and facts 
which give an accurate view of the activities of the Gardner State Colony for the 
past year. 

Professor Richard T. Fisher, appointed to the Board in 1930, died suddenly on 
June 9, 1934. Following is a copy of resolutions as appearing in the minutes of 
the meeting of the Board held July 18. 

"In the death of Richard Thornton Fisher, late a trustee of the Gardner 
State Colony, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts loses the services of 
a public officer superbly qualified to make valuable contribution to the 
common good. 



P.D. 70 ^ 

By inheritance, education, ej^eSence and special knowledge in his 
chosen field of arbori-culture he combined in himself the cultural qualities, 
the breadth of view and scientific skill which made him at once a courteous, 
kindly gentleman, a delightful associate, a helpful adviser in the manage- 
ment of the forests of the Gardner State Colony, a wise councillor in 
problems of administration and a force for good in the public service. 

Lover of beauty, idealist, expert, fair minded, courteous, he left on all 
with whom he came in contact the influence of his charming personality. 

As a mark of the respect in which he was held by his associates, and 
as a tribute to him for his services to the Commonwealth, the Trustees 
of the Gardner State Colony order this memorial spread on their records 
and a copy sent to his bereaved family.' ' 

Mrs. Grace A. Brooks, of Athol, was appointed a member of the Board, to fill 
the unexpired term caused by the resignation of Mrs. Amie H. Goes, who was a 
member of the first Board appointed in 1901 and continued until the time of her 
resignation in 1933. 

Mr. Frank W. Lyman, of Ashby, was appointed to fill the unexpired term of 
Professor Richard T. Fisher, ending February 1939. 

Financial 

For the year, we had an average daily population of 1,418.678. Our expenses 
for maintenance totalled $401,739.30, which is equal to a gross per capita cost of 
$5.45 per week per patient, $.08 less than in 1933. 

An analysis of each dollar expended is as follows: 



Personal service $.522 

Travel, transportation and office 009 

Food 126 

Clothing and materials 025 

Religious instruction 003 

F^irnishing and household supplies 047 

Medical and general care 073 

Heat and other plant operations 083 

Farm 063 

Garage and grounds 009 

Repairs ordinary 029 

Repairs unusual Oil 



ri.oo 

Projects 

C. W. A. Project No. 1957, "Ditching and Draining of Lowland/' 
Ended April 19 

This provided occupation for between 30 and 100 men. The part of this project 
which was completed will add from sixty to seventy acres of drained land to our 
farm, which should result in a year or two, in our producing all the hay required. 
We now purchase from ten to twelve cars per year. 

P. W. A. Project M-10. Storehouse 
This work was started in June, and after many unavoidable delays, the building 
itself is practically completed and should be in use by the first of April. 

P. W\ A. Project M-l^S, Shop Building 
Fifty-seven thousand seven hundred fifty dollars was made available for this. 
Bids have been opened, but the contract has not yet been awarded, waiting, pre- 
sumably, for definite approval from Washington. 

Fire Protection 

Vitalarms and alarm gongs have been installed in the attics of the two hospital 
and two treatment buildings, as a temporary protective measure. Money was 
requested that sprinkler systems might be installed in the Administration Building, 



4 



P.D. 70 



Domestic Building and the Dairy Barn. Delay has occurred in this installation 
because of the reduced appropriation made, sufficient only for the purchase of 
material, and also because of the fact that under the "Code" we have not been 
permitted to purchase sprinkler heads unless installed by the contractor doing the 
work. The piping system is being installed by our own labor with the expectation 
that some way may be found later to purchase sprinkler heads. 

Money also was appropriated for the erection of fire escapes on a number of 
buildings, but the appropriation granted was so reduced that materials only 
could be purchased. Material has been purchased and fire escapes are now being 
erected by our own labor. 

Farm Operations 

Farm operations for the year were very successful. All vegetables for the year 
were produced, and a large amount of excess vegetables was distributed to other 
hospitals. 

The operation of the cannery was also successful, being on a slightly larger scale 
than in 1933. 

At the dairy, an average of fifty-three cows milked produced an average, per 
cow, of 16,173 lbs. for the year, this being the highest of any of the sixteen State 
Hospitals. 

Recommendations 

We wish to call special attention to the further need of fire protection. We have 
previously called attention to the need of better fire protection, and some progress 
has been made in installing sprinkler systems in certain buildings, the establish- 
ment of an outside fire alarm system, etc., but still more and better protection is 
required, particularly in those buildings, including the colonies, occupied by the 
patients. We urge that special attention be given this matter and that as soon 
as possible all buildings occupied by patients be equipped with sprinkler systems 
so installed as to become an integral part of the general fire alarm system. 

We again wish to emphasize that this hospital was established along colony 
lines, and we believe further extension of colonies should now be considered. In 
recent years, the need of greater development along hospital lines caused provision 
to be made for buildings of the hospital type. This development, with the ex- 
ception of a suitable building in v/hich to receive new patients, is now fairly com- 
plete. We urge that further development to care for numbers be provided in 
additional colonies or enlargement of present colonies, which may be done at a lesser 
cost per patient bed than buildings of the hospital type and would provide for a 
more normal housing and care of patients than is possible in large hospital buildings. 
Established as a colony type of institution, we believe it should be continued as such. 

The Trustees are in entire sympathy with the report and recommendations of 
the Superintendent, the reading of which is strongly recommended. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Grace A. Brooks Frederic A. Washburn 

Frank W. Lyman Fred N. Dillon 

George A. Marshall Owen A. Hoban 

Grace Nichols 

January 18, 1935 Trustees 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony: 

It is my privilege to present herewith my report as Superintendent of the Gardner 
State Colony which is the thirty-second report of the institution. Matters relating 
to hospital activities are for the year ending September 30, while the financial year 
is of November 30. 

Movement of Population 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Number of patients Sept. 30, 1933 


. 833 


643 


1,476 


Resident 


. 776 


528 


1,304 


Family care 


4 


79 


83 


Absent on visit 


23 


35 


58 


Absent without leave 


. 30 


1 


31 



P.D. 70 5 

2. Admitted during the year 86 110 196 

First admission 59 45 104 

Re-admission 11 12 23 

By transfer 16 53 69 

3. Total number on books during year . . 919 753 1,672 

4. Dismissed during the year 82 76 158 

Discharged (excluding transfers and deaths) . . 41 45 86 

Recovered 6 6 

Improved 18 36 54 

Not improved 1 1 2 

Without psychosis 16 8 24 

Transferred 3 4 7 

Died 38 27 65 

5. Number in Family Care Oct. 1, 1933. ... 4 79 83 

Dismissed to Family Care 84 84 

Returned from Family Care 69 69 

Number remaining Sept. 30, 1934 .... 98 98 

Number of family care homes 24 

Average number per family 4 

6. Number remaining on books Sept. 30, 1934 837 677 1,514 

At the Colony 777 547 1,324 

In Family Care 98 98 

On Visit 25 31 56 

Absent without leave 35 1 36 



Statistical Review 

There were 196 admissions during the year. Of these 104 were admitted for 
the first time to any hospital. Twenty-three had previous hospital residence and 
sixty-nine were received by transfer. 

The status on admission was as follows: voluntary 11; temporary care 15; 
observation 15; regularly committed 86. 

Age of the 127 direct admissions: 8 were under 21 years; 18 between 21 and 
30; 46 between 30 and 50; 21 between 50 and 60; 34 over 60. 

Education: of the 104 first admissions 57 had common school; 26 high school; 
4 college graduates; 2 illiterate; 10 can read and write; 5 unknown. 

Citizenship: 63 native birth; 17 citizens by naturalization; 18 aliens; 6 un- 
known. In 68 instances one or both parents were of foreign birth; in 32 both 
parents were born in the United States; 4 unknown. 

Marital Condition: 32 single; 56 married; one divorced; 15 widowed. 

Economic Condition: 17 indicated as comfortable; 54 marginal; 25 dependent; 

8 unknown. , 

Environment: 34 were residents of cities or towns under 10,000 population; 
69 of cities of 10,000 or over; 1 unknown. 

Use of Alcohol: 66 abstained from liquor; 7 were moderate users; 27 intem- 
perate; 4 unknown. 

Diagnosis on Admission: 10 were suffering from senile psychosis; 11 with 
psychoses with cerebral arteriosclerosis; 12 dementia praecox; 15 manic depressive; 

9 acute alcoholic hallucinosis; 16 mental deficiency without psychosis; other 
conditions 31. 

Termination of Hospital Residence: Compared with 196 admitted during the 
year, 158 were dismissed as follows: Discharged 86; transferred 7; died 65. 

Of the 86 discharged, 6 were recovered; 56 improved; 2 unimproved; 32 with- 
out psychosis at the time of discharge; 7 were transferred. 

Deaths: The principle causes of death in the 65 who died were: cardio vascular 
disease 41 or 62.73 per cent; carcinoma 7 or 10.71 per cent; pulmonary tuber- 
culosis 5 or 7.65 per cent; broncho-pneumonia 3 or 4.59 per cent; lobar pneumonia 
2 or 3.06 per cent; pulmonary abscess 1 or 1.53 per cent; other causes 6 or 9.18 
per cent. 



6 



P.D. 70 



Nine of those who died had a hospital residence of 25 years; 15 between 10 
and 25 years; 16 be^tween one and five years; 25 who died had less than one year's 
residence. The cause of death in 17 of these 25 was cardio vascular disease. 

Extra Mural Service 

We have continued to carry on work of a preventive nature in the community 
this being under the direction of William A. Hunter, M.D., Psychiatrist assisted 
by a psychologist, social worker and clerk. Practically their entire time is given 
to extra mural work, which includes the out-patient Clinics, child guidance clinics, 
examination of backward children in the public schools, direction of the Family 
Care Division, and the giving of mental hygiene lectures to many organizations. 

The regular monthly clinic in Fitchburg has been continued to which patients 
from the Colony on visit report, to which also come those seeking advice and those 
referred by physicians, social agencies, etc. During the year 90 sought advice or 
treatment. Some of these were psychiatric problems while others were social 
service problems requiring study of the home and relatives. Twenty-four patients 
were seen at the Colony for consultation, 44 were seen at other hospitals, 10 were 
seen at home and 6 at court. The monthly clinic in Fitchburg has been handi- 
capped because of lack of room and privacy at the City Hall because of activities 
of E. R. A. Committees requiring room. This handicap has now been overcome 
and we expect the work of the clinic to be much broadened during the coming year. 

Social Service: Visits have been made to homes or places of employment in all 
cases received at the hospital. A full history of the family situation and subse- 
quent situations relating to the mental illness of the patient are investigated and 
recorded. This becomes a part of the history of the patient for the benefit of 
the medical staff that they may have a full understanding of the patient's back- 
ground. 107 histories were taken; 297 calls were made relative to new admissions; 
204 visits were made to patients on visit; 136 to relatives; 80 to others including 
agencies. Patients away from the hospital on visit are not inclined to report as 
we desire and the establishment of an evening clinic is under consideration. The 
social service worker not only visits the home at the time of admission but con- 
tinues personal contact with the patient after admission. A better understanding 
of the patient is of value when one returns to his or her home. Owing to the 
rural nature of our area the social service worker travelled 9,210 miles, the expense 
of travel being $373.13. 

Psychological study was given to 571 persons; 170 of these in the Child Guidance 
Clinic; 316 m School Clinic; 4 Adult Patient Clinic; 81 Adult Hospital Patients; 
24 various. There has been an increase in the number of adult patients admitted 
and studied by the psychologist. Considerable work of this nature has also been 
done in the examination of patients in residents who have been diagnosed mental 
deficiency without psychosis and whose intelligence has not before been tested. 
In other words, psychological study has been made not only of patients seen at 
clinics but as well of those admitted and also to those who have had long hospital 
residence that their intelligence quotient may be determined. 

School Clinics: 315 backward children in the public schools were examined in 
17 cities and towns which is an increase over previous years. Of these, 271 received 
examination for the first time, 44 were re-examinations. In the 271 examined 
the following recommendations were made: 108 special class, 9 institutional care; 
198 continue in grade. The diagnoses were 62 feeble minded; 78 borderline; 
83 dull; 81 normal; 9 superior and 2 deferred. Special classes for retarded children 
have been continued in Fitchburg. Gardner is now making plans to establish 
special classes. Other towns and cities have not established classes, although in 
some the number of retarded children is sufficient to require them. 

Child Guidance Clinic: These clinics have been held twice each week at Fitch- 
burg, Gardner and elsewhere by appointment. 80 individuals were studied and 
treated during the year; 53 of these were new cases; 15 were cases previously 
studied aSnd 12 were carried over from the previous year. Of the 53 new cases, 
27 were from Fitchburg; 14 from Gardner and 12 from other towns. 

Juvenile Court Cases: Juvenile delinquents have been referred to us by the 
Courts for study and recommendation. 21 children have been examined; 16 boys 



P.D. 70 



7 



and 5 girls. Examination showed that two were normal; 5 dull; 6 borderline; 
8 feebleminded. These studies are of great importance as they provide the court 
with information as to the intelligence of the indiv^idual. 

We believe this extra mural service to be of great value both in aiding in the 
immediate problems presented and also in developing a much broader mental 
hygiene understanding. While it cannot be accurately measured it is very probable 
that serious mental disease may be prevented in a certain number of individuals 
and a re-adjustment made in many others. 

I General Medical 

There have been several changes in the Medical Staff: Dr. Henry L. Clow, 
Assistant Superintendent resigned January 26. Dr. Frederick P. Moore, Senior 
Physician was appointed Assistant Superintendent January 28. Dr. William A. 
Hunter, Assistant Physician was promoted to Senior Physician February 19, and 
is now in charge of the male service. Dr. Janet S. Barnes, University of Michigan, 
was appointed Assistant Physician Sept. 18 in charge of the Out-Patient, Family 
Care and the Infirmary Services. Dr. Paul H. Wilcox, University of Michigan, was 
appointed to the position of Assistant Physician March 14. Dr. Mary Danforth, 
a member of the Staff since Oct. 1, 1927 resigned because of ill health. Dr. Mary 
Bolger, Tufts Medical School, formerly Interne, accepted a temporary appointment 
as Assistant Physician from April 1 to July 1 when she entered private practice at 
Worcester. 

W^e have had many occasions to call upon our Consulting Medical Staff and 
we are indebted to them for the services they have rendered. Dr. A. F. Lowell, 
of Gardner, has continued as Consulting Surgeon; Dr. H. D. Bone, of Gardner, 
Ophthalmologist; Dr. George A. Mossman, of Gardner, Orthopedic Surgeon; Dr. 
C. H. Jennings, of Fitchburg, Roentenologist. 

Four cases of diphtheria occurred in patients admitted, one only running a 
typical course. Strict isolation and immunization prevented its spread. 

The following meetings have been held at the Colony: — Family Caretakers, 25 
in number on September 13, to visit the hospital and receive instruction as to the 
care of patients now in their homes; The Athol Exchange Club, 40 present, met 
on June 20; The Hospital Head Farmers, July 17; A class from the Fitchburg 
Teachers' College, July 18; Worcester North District Medical Society, October 24; 
The Wachusett District Dental Society, November 7. At these meetings and 
others held each year it is our endeavor to present a psychiatric program that a 
better understanding of mental diseases may prevail and how they may be pre- 
vented, but more important than this, to spread information throughout the 
community urging particularly early identification of warning signals and early 
examination and where necessary much earlier hospital study and treatment. 

Family Care 

Caring for suitable patients in homes apart from the institution but supervised 
by it has been in use in foreign countries for a number of centuries. Until recently 
Massachusetts was the only state in this country having a family care system. 
It was established in 1885 and 1886 by statute. In earlier years its growth was 
slow. Patients were then boarded out only by the Central Board until 1905. 
In 1915 the State Board discontinued placement of patients in families but ex- 
tended this privilege to the hospitals. In 1933 it discontinued its boarding out 
department and made the boarding out system a hospital function. 

In 1915 when the State Board discontinued its own selection of patients we 
continued it. At the beginning of this year we had 83 patients placed in 23 private 
homes. On September 30, 1934, there were 98 patients cared for in homes in the 
community under our supervision. These homes in rural communities provide a 
home for those patients who do not need expensive hospital care but who for 
sufficient reason cannot be returned to their former homes. In this way room is 
provided for similar numbers at the hospital. The history of family care and its 
practice in Massachusetts was reviewed in a paper presented at the meeting of the 
American Psychiatric Association in New York City in June 1934. 



8 



P.D. 70 



Dental Department 

The work of this department has been carried out actively throughout the year. 
All patients received are examined and the findings charted. Prophylactic and 
corrective work has been attended to promptly that any contributing causes of 
illness requiring admission may be detected and corrected. 

Conditions contributory to mental disease are found but more especially are 
conditions found causing reduced physical resistance. The correcting of all condi- 
tions which contribute to reduced vitality is naturally of great importance. 

Research work in oral pathology and surgery especially, as it pertains to the 
mentally afflicted, has continued under James H. Maycock, D.M.D., resident 
dentist. His work has attracted some attention and papers have been requested 
and presented at Clinics as follows: Sectional Meeting, Chicago; District Meeting 
at Pittsfield, Mass.; Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts State Dental Society: 
Annual National Meeting of the American Dental Association; Wachusett Dental 
Meeting. 



The work of the year is shown as follows: 

Number of patients 4,577 

Number of examinations 4,577 

Prophylaxes 1,952 

Fillings: 177 
Amalgam, 134; cement, 8; synthetic, 16; gutta percha, 19. 

Root Canal Treatments 27 

Extractions: 711 

Local, 652; general, 59. 

Treatment for Pathological Conditions 1,937 



Pyorrhea, 273; Vincent's infection, 246; mercurial stomatitis, 287; 
miscellaneous, 1,131. 
Plates: 

Full dentures made and inserted, 12; adjusted, 53; repaired, 40. 



Bridges — Crowns removed 26 

Oral surgical operations 621 

Surgical treatment — abscesses 180 

Surgical extractions 141 

Impactions 27 

Alveolectomies 1 50 

Cysts 34 

Curettage . 9 

Surgical pyorrhea 9 

Miscellaneous surgical operations 71 

Pre-operative treatments 172 

Post-operative treatments . 845 

X-rays taken 156 

Microscopic smears taken 1,683 



Nursing 

In 1930 we established a two year course in psychiatric nursing for our attendant 
nurses. This course has been continued. This year six seniors completed the 
course; five have been advanced to charge positions. Fourteen juniors passed the 
examination at the end of their first year. In September 1934 there were 11 
seniors and 21 juniors enrolled. 

Our aim is to better train our attendant nurses for the work they are expected 
to do in caring for our patients or those requiring special nursing of a psychiatric 
character in the community. Results obtained thus far seem to justify continuing 
the course. 

Treatments 

Under this broad title may be included all major or minor efforts made to cure 
or to re-adjust the patient. In some cases it may be a surgical operation while 
in others it may be kindly, helpful, cooperative understanding of the patient's 
situation in which an interested helpfulness would tend toward re-adjustment. 



P.D. 70 



9 



Here I will only review the activities of the various departments actually engaged 
in every day treatment such as hydrotherapy, physical-therapy, personal hygiene, 
occupational therapy, diversion, recreation, etc. 

It is now definitely established that seclusion and restraint of the past are 
abolished. The use of strong sedative drugs is now limited. It is recognized that 
a person ner^-ously or mentally ill, is ill, and that the matter of segregation from 
the community is not sufficient but that one must endeavor to find the basis of 
the illness and treat the cause if possible and through the various means at our 
disposal assist so far as possible in re-adjusting the mechanism of the patient. 
Frequently it is found that a patient is ill because of physical causes, depressed, 
excited because of his environment, loss of business, etc. Each patient presents 
an illness peculiar to himself no matter how we may group them as to nomenclature 
of disease. It is essential to find the cause in the individual and if possible correct it. 
The three most effective measures of treatment are: Removal from the former 
environment and supplying quiet, rest, nursing, diet and sleep: Treatment by 
hydrotherapy in any of its various forms best suited to the needs of the patient; 
Opportunity for diversion, recreation and employment that the mind may be 
diverted from trouble by substituting normal activities. 

We have well equipped buildings for treatment by hydrotherapy in its various 
forms. This equipment has been used daily throughout the year. Such treatment 
may take the form of the continuous bath for a sedative quieting effect: cabinet 
baths: salt glow: needle spray and general tonic treatment for those who need 
a bracing treatment: colonic therapy which we have used so much and value so 
highly: the wet sheet envelopment for which we find a limited need and have 
restricted markedly owing to its restraining features. If one were to judge by the 
opinions expressed by recovered patients, one must conclude that the continuous 
bath and colonic therapy are the two forms that have given the greatest relief 
and benefit. 

Seventeen patients whose condition is caused by syphilis have been given anti- 
leuetic treatment. Twelve of these had meningo-encephalitis; 4 meningo vascular 
type; 1 gastric type. Those anti-leuetic drugs now in common use such as tr>-parsa- 
mine, protiodide of mercur>', thiobismol, arsphenamine, necarsphenamine have 
been used, particularly trjiDarsamine, of which 122 treatments have been given 
and thiobismol of which 69 treatments have been given. The results as reported 
in former years have not been particularly encouraging due largely perhaps to the 
fact that in the majorit>' of our cases the disease is of long duration and the 
spirouchettes causing the disease are so deep seated that treatment does not 
effectively reach them. This year 12*^ of those treated improved sufficiently to 
return to civil life; 41 were somewhat improved: 23 were not changed; 
12*^ not as well: 12 have died. 

During the last half of the year Dr. Wilcox has conducted an interesting experi- 
ment as to the possible therapeutic value of color. The Hall Laboratories of 
Boston kindly loaned us a revolving color unit known as the ' " Psychochromosphere " ' 
which unit has been operated at inter^-als in the continuous bath suite. It was 
also used for individual therapy on post operative cases. A total of 10 male and 
19 female patients have been studied by this method. Nine of these were of the 
manic depressive group; 11 dementia praecox: one of psychopathic personality: 
5 of mental deficiency with psychosis. 

The result of this preliminan,- study suggests that color may have a legitimate 
place in the therapeutic program of a hospital. In the continuous bath room 
there was a noticeable quieting effect on the patients. In a manic case there was 
a definite sedative effect: on a post operative un-cooperative patient rather a 
remarkable sedative effect was seen definitely shortening the period of surgical 
control. Several have expressed themselves appreciative of a soothing relaxing 
effect. The work done thus far shows some promise. The mobile color form unit 
seems to have some beneficial sedative effect. 

OccuPATioxAL* Therapy 
The activities of our Occupational Therapy Department are well known to you 
because you have taken a very active interest in them. It has been said that there 
is nothing new in occupational therapy except the name, possibly this in part is 



10 



P.D. 70 



true, but to me the something new in occupational therapy is the ever increasing 
interest in it and a better knowledge of its application. It perhaps has received 
its greatest use in mental hospitals and there possibly this increasing interest is 
noticeable. 

Occupational therapy offers a means of recovery to some; in others physical work 
is good for the body and mind, and to still others handicraft and diversion relieves 
the monotony. In all of these it has a valuable place. Occupational therapy as 
we see it is not limited to invalid occupation or necessarily to hasten recovery. 
While it may be an aid to recovery in some, it provides a normal life and influence 
to many more who are not to fully recover. Occupational therapy is an adjunct 
to other forms of treatment. In a hospital such as ours it should be borne in 
mind that to continue invalid occupation in the adult beyond a certain point re- 
sults in little more than relief from monotony, while worthwhile productive occu- 
pation may result in greater personal satisfaction. From the establishment of the 
colony as an industrial hospital for the development of occupation we have 
applied occupational therapy in a broad program. Most adults are and should be 
interested in adult pursuits therefore worthwhile occupation plays a major part 
in our program. Mental health is a matter of fitting into every day life even 
though it is that of a hospital. 

It has been well pointed out that occupational therapy is especially useful 
in increasing a patient's happiness and in assisting in the problems of his manage- 
ment in building up his power of concentration and application and in increasing 
his usefulness while at the hospital, or after discharge, and thereby increasing 
his economic value. 

We have trained occupational therapy workers engaged daily in the intensive 
teaching of arts and crafts to groups of patients in the industrial buildings and to 
groups on the wards as well as at the bedside. Others are employed in the sewing 
and mending rooms, others are engaged in more constructive pursuits such as the 
weaving and making of clothing, shoes, furniture, and out of doors in the pro- 
duction of milk, the raising of vegetables and assisting in construction and repairs. 

Our occupational program for training and employment has been broad, not 
limited by the idea of cure because this cannot be hoped for in a large percentage 
of our patients but arranged to embrace all classes under care some of whom may 
be cured, some of whom may be re-established in the community while others will, 
of necessity, remain under care. It is of interest that this view of occupational 
therapy which has been our conception since the establishment of the colony is 
now being more generally accepted rather than confining it narrowly to the teaching 
of arts and crafts with the sole aim to cure. In directing our Industrial Department 
so that those employed may assist in their own maintenance, the following has 
been accomplished with benefit to the individual of value to the hospital and of 
some relief to the tax payer. 

During the year 89,330 articles of clothing and household furnishings have been 
produced at $18,590.79. In the women's departments 19,000 pieces of men's and 
women's clothing has been made; 3,081 articles of household furnishings; 2,356 
pieces of table linen; 3,519 articles of bedding and material and other lesser 
articles at a value of $8,250. 37,680 articles of clothing and furnishings have 
been repaired. 

In the Textile Department 30,601 yds. of cloth was woven as fol'ows: Ticking, 
549 yds.; gingham, 4,590 yds.; shirting, 3,365 yds.; sheeting, 8,292 yds.; toweling, 
7,689 yds.; bedspread material, 2,282 yds.; woven underwear material, 2,591 yds.; 
strong cloth, 142 yds.; miscellaneous, 1,100 yds. This department also made 
1,846 brooms and brushes; 46 rubber mats; 42 mattresses and pillows. The total 
value of articles produced in the Textile Department is $5,254.41. 

In the Tailoring Department 6,666 articles of men's and women's clothing were 
cut and assembled for the women's department; 1,812 articles of men's clothing 
were made. The value of the later being $2,413.67. In addition 5,905 articles 
of clothing were repaired and pressed upon which no money value is placed. 

In the Shoe Department 1,083 pairs of men's shoes and slippers and 242 pairs 
of women's shoes were made, the value of which is $2,254.53. In addition 333 
pair of shoes have been rebuilt; 2,483 pairs repaired; 2,710 miscellaneous articles 
mended and repaired. 



P.D. 70 



11 



In the Furniture Department 285 pieces of furniture were made, valued at 
$415.38. In addition 2,597 pieces of furniture have been repaired and refinished 
ready for the painter. 

In the Printing Department operated for the Department of Mental Diseases 
have been printed the annual reports of the Department and for the sixteen in- 
situtions under its supervision; four quarterly bulletins; all forms used by the 
Department and hospitals; payroll checks; Christmas folders; commitment blanks. 
Some twenty-two tons of printed matter have been produced. This is a very 
important department in our occupational therapy program. An average of 
twelve patients have been employed here, much of the work being done by hand 
and in all of which the patients treated here are much interested. 

Entertainment 

Motion picture entertainments, dances and parties as well as out of door special 
events have been most enjoyed. Motion pictures have been held weekly in the 
winter and early spring months and on occasion throughout the remainder of the 
year. Dances have been held at intervals usually with refreshments. Special 
parties are arranged for Christmas, New Years, Hallowe'en, etc. Throughout 
Christmas week a daily program is arranged ending with a ball at New Years. 
On July 4 and "Field Day" September 26 all day out of door programs of sports 
and entertainment were carried out. On "Field Day" 778 patients were out of 
doors about the grounds. The baseball team played 28 games with visiting teams 
for the benefit of the patients. Band concerts during the summer were given by 
our band and with refreshments were much enjoyed. Refreshments help to make 
our programs complete as is the case with normal individuals in the community. 
Under the ERA four vaudeville entertainments were given. Classes in deportment 
and dancing have been held twice weekly during the fall under a non-resident in- 
structor and these will be continued through the winter. Entertainments given 
by our employees have been appreciated much more, I believe, than hired talent. 

Financial 

Total expenses for maintenance have been $401,723.20 equal to a gross weekly 
per capita cost of $5.46, compared with $5.53 for 1933. An analysis of each dollar 
expended shows that $.52 was expended for personal service; $.12 for food; $.07 for 
medical and general care and $.08 for heat, light and power. 

Special Appropriations, 1934 

No special appropriations were made by the Legislature direct. Under the P. W. A. 
for construction of a storehouse and cold storage, known as State Project ,M-10, 
$136,000 was appropriated. Later in the year an appropriation of $47,750 was 
made available for a shop building known as State Project M-43. 

Plans for a storehouse 132 x 68 feet were made by the Department of Mental 
Diseases and work was begun under contract in June 1934. This storehouse is 
of three stories with ice making machinery and cold storage ice boxes. The building 
has been erected, closed in and should be ready for occupancy in the early spring. 

Changes in Electrical Distribution: This work was started October 19 but has 
been delayed and will not be completed until late in the winter. 

While an appropriation for a shop building has been made and plans submitted, 
final approval has not as yet been received. A building 48 x 146 feet of two stories 
is planned where under one roof will be housed the carpenter shop, blacksmith 
shop, paint shop, plumber shop, electrical shop, tinsmith shop and a large storage 
for lumber with a dry kiln. 

My last report reviewed a ditching and draining project then underway under 
the C. W. A. This was a program of ditching lowland so that from 60 to 70 acres 
of land might be brought under cultivation and that employment might be given 
to the then unemployed men of Gardner and vicinity. In the early weeks of this 
project 100 men were given work. This number was reduced to finally 30 when 
the work was stopped on April 19. More than two thirds of the work first planned 
was completed and already some fifteen acres have been worked and seeded. 
We are very hopeful that on this land, part of which has been reclaimed, we will 
eventually be able to raise all hay necessary for our farm animals. The cost of 



12 



P.D. 70 



the project was $12,831. This work was carried on during the severe winter 
weather, the workmen being employed in wet land and icy water and I would 
be remiss if I did not mention, in behalf of the men employed, that our employees 
raised a fund for the unemployed which was expended for hot soup, coffee, dough- 
nuts, etc., and sent to the men each noon every day while they were employed 
on this work. It was a fine thing for the employees to do and was fully appreciated 
by those employed. 

Renewals 1934 

Money was appropriated for the installation of sprinkler systems, better fire 
protection and fire escapes but the money appropriated was reduced from the 
amount requested to a point where it was possible only to purchase materials. 
Materials were purchased and the work is being done by our own workmen but 
very definitely retarded because of our small working force. 

Difficulty has also been experienced in the purchase of sprinkler heads. These 
have not yet been received. Necessarily the installation will continue into 1935. 

An underground tunnel from the Women's Treatment Building to the Monadnock 
Cottage has been constructed which allows for the passage of personnel, delivery 
of food trucks and steam and hot water pipes. Both the Monadnock and Watatic 
Cottages are supplied now from the central heating plant allowing the removal 
of low pressure boilers in each of these buildings. 

Money was made available for installing oil heaters in our bake oven. This 
work has been done resulting in material improvement in the bakery products. 

Electrical equipment to operate the Jay Bee hammer mill for the grinding of 
grain and fodder was purchased. This mill is in operation. It is a distinct addition 
to our farm, grinding as it does, one ton of grain per hour. 

Money was appropriated for electrical changes in five cottages but it was suffi- 
cient only for the purchase of materials. Because of the fact that we have but 
one electrician, also occupied as engineer, this work will be seriously delayed. 

A gasoline portable centrifugal pump for draining ditches, etc., and a power tube 
cleaner at the power house have been purchased. 

General Repairs 

Although our force is small and quite inadequate, general repairs have been 
well attended to. All buildings are in a very good state of repair. A few repairs 
and additions of major importance are: 

Subways at the Gardner Cottages under construction last year have been com- 
pleted. These buildings are now connected allowing free intercommunication and 
a satisfactory re-arrangement of the heating lines. Because of these subways two 
basements have been thoroughly re-modelled. 

A covered manure pit has been constructed at the Belcher Barn. 

An unused bungalow has been moved and made into a grain room at the barn. 

The ice house at the Belcher Cottage has been made into a wagon shed. 

The original coal trestle no longer in use has been removed. 

The Hillcrest Cottage front has been remodelled and rebuilt. 

We employ one painter only who is assisted by patients. Eight buildings have 
been painted on the outside and fourteen buildings inside. 1,409 pieces of furniture 
have been re-finished in the paint shop and 688 panes of glass set. 

Sprinkler heads have been installed in the attics of the Monadnock and Watatic 
Cottages. 

A hydrotherapeutic outfit has been installed in the Men's Treatment Building. 
Flush lighting fixtures have been installed in the single rooms and corridor on 
the second floor of the Women's Treatment Building. 

Special Appropriations 1935 
Following is a list of special needs of a size sufficient to require special appro- 
priations. 

1. Fire protection $19,178.41 

2. Additional laundry equipment 16,005.00 

3. Barn and silos 14,000.00 

4. Hay and grain barn 10,000.00 



P.D. 70 



13 



5. Superintendent's house 20,000.00 

6. Hospital building for the acute and curable . . 245,000 .00 

7. Central building at the valley group .... 85,000.00 

8. Additional colony group 100,000 .00 

9. Refrigeration 3,368.00 

10. Repairs and equipment — main kitchen 9,200 .00 

11. Two bakery ovens 8,000 .00 

12. Two pottery kilns 3,000 .00 

13. Vegetable storage building 7,850 .00 



This list of special appropriations with a description and reason for each has been 
submitted to the Department of Mental Diseases under date of August 13, 1934. 

Renewals 1935 

Following is a list of needs for "Renewals, not recurring Annually'' as included in 



our budget for maintenance for 1935. 

1. Changing the old power house into a garage . $2,196 .00 

2. Laundry equipment 15,000.00 

3. Vegetable preparation room — main kitchen . 2,686 .00 

4. Permanent road from garage to new store, carpenter shop 

to main kitchen and laundry 818.20 

5. Oiling one mile stone filled road 678.00 

6. Construction of two pottery kilns 2,750.00 

7. Additions to poultry plant 1,608 .00 

8. Vegetable storage — Westminster Cottage 5,850 .00 

9. Resurfacing filter beds at Main Group and Gardner 
cottages 650.00 

10. Coal moving equipment 1,358 .00 

11. Refrigeration 3,368.98 

12. Repairs to sidetrack 2,250 .00 

13. Coal pocket 477.50 

14. Cement record vault 1,522 .00 

15. Cooking and heating building at piggery and manure pit. 2,949.00 

16. Installation of electric fixtures — Women's Infirmary . 250.00 

17. Automatic heat control — Employees Cottages 672 . 50 

18. Subways — Men's and Women's Infirmaries to Domestic 

Building 1,814.40 

19. X-ray Fluroscopic Unit 1,000 .00 

20. Repairs — Main Kitchen itile fJoor i .... 9,200 00 

21. Enclosure for out-door exercise 1,067 .00 

22. Beaver Model A. electric pipe machine .... 375 .00 

23. Poles for power and lighting 1,200 .00 

24. Vacuum for heating — Men's Infirmary and Domestic 

Building 330.00 

25. Connecting sprinklers with fire alarm system 2,530 .00 

26. Automatic toaster — cafeteria 200 .00 

27. Dry cleaning equipment 1,005.00 

28. Auto scale 1,068 .10 

29. Fire protection 100 .06 



$64,973 . 74 

Eight of these items appear both under requests for special appropriation and 
for renewals owing to the amount of money necessary. Each of these is sufficiently 
large to consider as special appropriations and are submitted in this way that they 
may be considered under either heading. The actual need of each is included in 
our request as presented and will not be repeated here. 

Farm 

In January, 1934, Mr. Percy L. Strout was appointed Head Farmer to fill an 
existing vacancy. Before appointment Mr. Strout was one of our Farm Colony 
Supervisors, well versed in colony activities, an experienced farmer so that under 
his direction the farm has been efficiently operated and further developed. 



14 



P.D. 70 



The farm is one of the major activities of the colony offering as it does an op- 
portunity for many of our men to work out of doors in healthful occupation and 
at the same time producing all vegetables, milk, etc., that we consume during the 
year. Production has gone beyond that this year and 26,450 pounds of carrots 
and 12,200 lbs. of onions were distributed to other hospitals. Fourteen cows and 
bred heifers have been supplied to another institution of similar character which 
was temporarily short of milk. A service boar has been supplied to a state school 
and a yearling full blood bull supplied to another hospital and a similar bull sold. 

The total acreage of land owned is 1,856; of this 460 acres are available for 
cultivation, 55 acres of which is tilled pasture land, leaving 405 acres for actual 
farm operation. Of this acreage 25 acres were devoted to ensilage and field corn; 
58 acres to oats; 187 to hay; 2 acres to mangle and root crop; 23 acres to meadow 
hay; 20 acres to potatoes; 50 acres to garden; 30 acres to fruit and orchard. 

The total expended on farm operations was $125,579.92. Total credits farm 
amounted to $160,284.71. The profit of all farm operations was $34,711.79. 

The severe hail storm on July 24 did much damage to all growing crops, parti- I 
cularly to potatoes, beans and squash. During the harvest season in September 
there were five pleasant days only during the month. Owing to the very severe 
winter much of the seeded ground was winter-killed and many of our strawberry 
plants were killed. Nevertheless, the year has been a successful one on the farm. 
We have been able to fully supply our needs for the coming year. 

Cannery: This was operated from July 9 to November 5 canning excess fruit 
and vegetables daily from the farm. The total amount canned was 18,747 gallons 
which exceeded the out-put of the previous year by 794 gallons. The total value 
of these vegetables and fruits canned was $4,565.53. In addition to this 3,767 
quarts of pickles, jellies, preserves, vegetables together with 15 barrels of cucumbers, 
piccalilli, etc., were preserved at the various cottage kitchens. 

Dairy: Operations in this department have been successful. An average of 
53.88 cows were milked and they produced an average of 16,173.64 pounds per cow 
exceeding that of the previous year by 933 pounds, per cow which showed a profit 
of $18,694.01. The cost of producing milk is $.02493 per pound which is equivalent 
to $.0536 per quart. Average butter fat test for the year was 3.76%^ The entire 
herd was tested for tuberculosis and no reactors were found for the eighth con- 
secutive year. One cow only showed mastitis actively and was killed. Two cows 
were killed because of abortion and one killed as a non-breeder. All heifers were 
treated for black leg and hemorrhagic septicemia before they were turned out to 
pasture and they summered well. Two years ago we experienced serious loss 
among the young stock in pasture from some cause simulating septicemia which 
was not actually determined. 

Poultry: 2,000 day old chicks were purchased. 1,000 were delivered March 2 
and 1,000 on March 21. The loss among these was small. Their growth has been 
good and now in winter quarters the prospect is encouraging. The average egg 
production per hen for the year was 199. The total cost of operating the poultry 
department was $4,483.85, the total credits $6,744.81, a gain of $1,864.21. 

Swine: 51,237 pounds of pork were produced and consumed at a loss of $1,642.34. 
There has been no serious illness among the swine. They were early and properly 
protected against hog cholera and septicemia but we have not overcome a loss 
noted each year in this department. 

Miscellaneous: We have reforested, as in previous years, 7,500 white pine, 
7,500 Norway spruce. 120 apple trees were set out replacing a non-productive 
pear orchard. Limited lumbering operations were carried on: 31,671 feet of white 
pine and 5,476 of maple were cut and sawed into building material at the saw mill; 
465 cords of wood were cut for fire wood; 500 tons of stone was crushed at the 
stone crusher. 5,526 pounds of wild blueberries were harvested. 1,632 tons of 
rock excavated; 7,030 tons of rock removed from fields; 2,601 square yards of 
road rebuilt; 11,899 square yards of road re-finished; 8,284 square yards of grading 
completed; 83 acres of land cleared of underbrush; 273^ acres of land cleared 
for fields. 



P.D. 70 



15 



Acknowledgments 

Unable, because of the number, to include in this report the names of all the 
friends of the Colony who have given generous contributions of fancy work, 
magazines, papers, library books, etc., I take this opportunity to express in behalf 
of our folks sincere appreciation of their interest and help. 

I do, however, wish to express appreciation to Mr. George A. Marshall, Trustee, 
for his donation of 1,000 bushels of apples from his apple orchards. These were 
thoroughly appreciated by our folks from which in addition to those consumed, we 
made 800 gallons of cider for vinegar. 

To Mrs. Amie H. Coes, former Trustee, I also wish to express thanks for her 
most generous annual gift of magazine subscriptions and also to Miss Grace Nichols, 
Trustee, for her particular interest in the out of door activities for women and 
her gift at the end of the year of an afternoon social with entertainment and re- 
freshments for those women interested in vegetable and flower gardens. 

I have, during another year, been most fortunate in having a loyal and cooper- 
ative corps of assistants and workers and to them I wish to express my appreciation 
and thanks. 

No words of mine can fully express to you, members of the Board of Trustees, 
my deep appreciation of your most helpful spirit of cooperation and assistance 
during this another year. I am deeply conscious of my obligation to you for your 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles E. Thompson, 

Superintendent. 

VALUATION 

November 30. 1934 



Land. 1.856 acres 
Buildings and betterments 



Real Estate 



$41,125.00 

1,532.769.13 



Travel, transportation and oflBce expenses 

Food 

Clothing and materials 
Furnishings and household supplies 
Medical and general care . 
Heat and other plant operation 

Farm 

Garage and grounds .... 
Repairs 



Real estate . 
Personal property 



Person- 



al Property 



Summary 



$1,573,894.13 



$300.00 
11.414.53 
21.556.85 
260.005 . 46 
2.792.39 
4.234.04 
70.664.9)9 
12.083.58 
28.909.93 

$411,961.77 



$1,573,894.13 
411.961.77 



$1,985,855.90 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

To the Department of Mental Diseases: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this institution for 
the fiscal year ending November 30, 1934. 

Statement of Earnings 

Board of patients $24,778.51 

Personal Services: 

Reimbursement from Board of Retirement 153.00 

Sales : 

Travel, transportation and office expenses $22.03 

Food 1,924.08 

Clothing and materials 87.15 

Medical and general care 28.00 

Heat and other plant operations 2.00 

Garage and grounds 1.50 

Repairs ordinary 74.21 

Arts and crafts sales 573.55 

Miscellaneous — Junk 2 . 40 

Farm 203.50 



Total Sales 



$3,018.42 



16 

Miscellaneous: 

Interest on bank balances 
Rents .... 
Post Office 
B. «fe M. Side Track 
Flour Penalty 



P.D. 70 



$288.84 
718.75 
180.00 
172.00 
21. 15 



Total Miscellaneous 1,380.74 



Total earnings for the year 

Total cash receipts reverting and transferred to the State Treasurer 
Accounts receivable outstanding December 1, 1933 . . . . 
Accounts receivable outstanding November 30, 1934 .... 
Accounts receivable increased 



$29,330.67 
29,330.67 



none 
none 



Maintenance Appropriation 
Balance from previous year, brought forward 
Appropriation, current year .... 

Total 

Expenditures as follows: 



Personal services 

Food 

Medical and general care .... 

Religious instruction 

Farm 

Heat and other plant operation 

Travel, transportation and office expenses 

Garage and grounds 

Clothing and materials .... 
Furnishings and household supplies 

Repairs ordinary 

Repairs and renewals 



Total maintenance expenditures 

Balance of maintenance appropriation, November 30, 1934 



$2,449.41 
427,809.00 



$430,258.41 



$208,910.56 
49,819.43 
29,237.80 

1,324.30 
26,133.05 
33,319.27 

3,902.46 

4,138.34 
10,305. 19 
16,291.27 
11,840.42 

4,317.21 



$401,739.30 
28,519.11 



Special Appropriations 
Balance December 1, 1933, brought forward .... 
Appropriations for current year 



$430,258.41 



$4,438.87 

183,750.00 

Total $188,188.87 

Expended during the year (see statement below) $55,748. 29 

Reverting to Treasury of Commonwealth * 420.37 

(Star balances below that are reverting) 56,168.66 

Balance November 30, 1934, carried to next year 



$132,020.21 



Appropriation 


Total Amount 
Appro- 
priated 


Expended 

during 
Fiscal Year 


Total 
Expended 
to Date 


Balance 
at end of 
Year 


Storehouse and Cold Storage, Project M-10, 

Docket 1,942 

Shop Building, Project M-43, Docket 5,900 
New Heating Plant and Equipment, Chap. 260 

Acts 1931 

Reverted 


$136,000.00 
47,750.00 

150,000.00 


$53,614.06 
31. 13 

2,103.10 


$53,614.06 
31. 13 

147,664.23 


$82,385.94 
47,718.87 

1,915.40 
420.37* 



Per Capita 

During the year the average number of patients has been, 1,418.67. 
Total cost of maintenance, $401,739.30. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of (52 weeks to year), $5.4457. 
Total receipts for the year, $29,330.67. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $.3975. 

Total net cost of maintenance for year (total maintenance less total receipts), $372,408.63. 
Net weekly per capita, $5.0482. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gertrude W. Perry, 

Treasurer. 



P.D. 70 17 

STATISTICAL TABLES 
As Adopted by the American Psychiatric Association Prescribed by the 
Masssachusetts Department of Mental Diseases 
Table 1. General Information 

(Data correct at end of institution year November 30. 1934) 

1. Date of opening as a hospital for mental diseases, October 22, 1902. 

2. Type of hospital: State. 

3. Hospital plant : — 

Value of hospital property: 

Real estate, including buildings $1,573,894.13 

Personal property 411,961.77 

Total $1,985,855.90 

Total acreage of hospital property owned 1,856 

Total acreage under cultivation during previous year, 322.25 

4. Officers and employees: 

Actually in Service Vacancies at End 

at End of Year of Year 

M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Superintendents 1 - 1 - ~ ~ 

Assistant physicians 6 1 7 - - - 

Clinical assistants - - - 1 ~ ^ 

Total physicians 7 1 8 1 - 1 

Stewards I - 1 - - ~ 

Resident dentists i - 1 - - ~ 

Pharmacists 1 - 1 - - 

Graduate nurses - 7 7 - - 

Other nurses and attendants .... 68 62 130 4 1 5 

Occupational therapists 4 5 9 1 - 1 

Social workers - 3 3 - - - 

A.1 other officers and employees ... 49 39 88 1 5 6 

Total officers and employees . . .131 117 248 7 6 13 

Classification by Diagnosis: September SO, 19SU 

5. Census of Patient Population at end of year: 

Absent from Hospital 

Actually in Hospital but Still on Books 

White: M. F. T. M. F. T. 

Insane 725 523 1,248 56 120 176 

Mental defectives 25 13 38 3 9 12 

Epileptic and Mentally Defective ... - 1 1 - 

All other cases 3 1 4 - 1 1 

Total 753 538 1,291 59 130 189 

Other Races: 

Insane 23 9 32 1 - 1 

Mental defectives 1 - 1 - - - 

Total 24 9 33 1 - 1 

Grand Total 777 547 1,324 60 130 190 

M. F. T. 

6. Patients under treatment in occupational-therapy classes, including 

physical training, on date of report .40 234 274 

7. Other patients employed in general work of hospital on date of report 561 151 712 

8. Average daily number of all patients actually in hospital during year . 777.72 543.94 1,321.66 

9. Voluntary* patients admitted during year 6 S 11 

10. Person? given advice or treatment in out-patient clinics during year . 34 36 70 



18 



P.D. 70 




P.D. 70 19 



Table 3. Nativity of First Admissions and of Parents of First Admissions 











Parents of Male 


Parents of Female 






Patients 






Patients 






Patients 




^^ATIVITY 


















































Both 






Both 




M. 


p 


T. 




Mothers Parents 


X clLllCl O 


Mothers Parents 


United States * . 


28 


17 


45 


17 


17 


14 


J J 


11 


9 




2 




7 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


13eiiniark 
















1 




England 


2 




2 


2 


4 


2 




2 




Finland 


2 


5 


7 


5 


6 


6 


5 


6 


6 


Germany 




J 




1 






1 


2 


1 








J 








1 


1 


I 


Ireland 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


2 


2 


Poland 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Scotland .... 














1 






Sweden .... 




2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


2 


2 


Turkey in Europe 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 








West Indies 3 
















1 




Other Countries . 


1 




1 


1 


1 


I 








Unknown .... 








2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Total .... 


39 


34 


73 


39 


39 


32 


34 


34 


26 



KPersons born in Hawaii, Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands should be recorded as born in the U. S.) 
^Includes Newfoundland. ^Except Cuba, Porto Rico and Virgin Islands. 



20 



P.D. 70 



it 



b I 



i H 



! I I I I I I 
! I I I I • i 



I I I i I 
I 



I I I I I I 



1 i — — 
I I I 
I I — I 



I I I I „ 1 I I 1 I I I 

-(N- 1 1 1 I I -« I I I I 



' -> i I fit 



— 1 I 1 i 



^ i 



i — — ! i 



lllllllllllllll I 



P.D. 70 



21 



Table 5. Citizenship of First Admissions 

M. F. T. 



Citizens by birth 28 17 45 

Citizens by naturalization 3 10 13 

Aliens 7 4 11 

Citizenship unknown 1 3 4 

Total 39 34 73 



Table 6. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 



Race 




Total 


With 
syphilitic 
meningo- 
encephalitis 


With 
other 
forms of 
syphilis 


Alcoholic 
psychoses 


With 
cerebral 
arterio- 
sclerosis 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


Greek . 
Scandinavian i 
Other specific races 
Race unknown . 
Total . 




8 
6 
4 

1 
5 
2 
1 

9 
2 


5 
5 
3 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 

9 
3 


13 
11 

7 
1 

2 
8 
5 
2 
1 

18 
5 


2-2 
- 1 1 


1 - 1 


1 - 1 

1 - 1 

1 - 1 
1 - 1 

3-3 


2 3 5 
1 - 1 
1 1 
1 1 

-33 




39 


34 


73 


2 1 3 


1 - 1 


7 - 7 


3 8 11 


Table 6. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 


Race 


With 

other 
disturbances 
of circulation 


Senile 
psychoses 


Involutional 
psychoses 


Due to 
other 
metabolic 
diseases, etc. 


With organic 
changes of 
nervous 
system 


Psycho- 
neruoses 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


Enclish . 
Finnish . 
French . 
German 
Greek 
Irish 

Scandinavian ' 
Slavonic ^ 
Other specific races 
Mixed . 
Race unknown 

Total . 


1 - 1 
1 1 2 


2-2 
1 1 

1 - 1 
1 1 

1 2 3 

- 2 2 


1 1 2 
1 - 1 


1 1 2 
1 1 


1 - 1 


1 - i 
1 - 1 


2 1 3 


4 6 10 


2 1 3 


1 2 3 


1 - 1 


2-2 


Table 6. Race of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 


Race 


Manic- 
depressive 
psychoses 


Dementia 
praecox 


Paranoia 

and 
paranoid 
conditions 


With mental 
deficiency 


Without 
psychoses 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


English 

Finnish 

French . . . 

German 

Greek 

Irish 

Scandinavian i . . . . 

Slavonic * 

Other specific races 

Mixed 

Race unknown .... 

Total 


1 - 1 
1 1 2 

1 - 1 

- 2 2 

2 3 5 

- 1 1 


- 1 1 

2 2 4 

3 1 4 
1 1 

1 - 1 


1 1 
1 1 


1 1 

1 - 1 
1 - 1 


1 - 1 


5 7 12 


6 5 11 


- 2 2 


2 1 3 


1 - 1 



^Norwegians, Danes and Swedes. 

^Includes Bohemian, Bosnian, Croatian, Dalmatian, Herzegovinian, Montenegrin. Moravian. Polish, 
Russian, Ruthenian, Servian, Slovak, Slovenian. 



22 P.D. 70 



Table 7. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 











0-14 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 




Total 




years 


years 


years 


years 


Psychoses 




















M. 


r . 


T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. T. 


M. F. 


T. 


Witl syphilitic meningo-encephalitis 


2 


1 


3 












With other forms of syphilis .... 


J 




1 












Alcoholic psychose" ...... 


•J 




7 












With cerebral arteriosclerosis .... 


1 
o 


Q 
O 


11 












With other disturbances of circulation . 


2 


1 


3 












Senile psychoses ...... 


4 


6 


10 












Involutional psychoses ... 


2 


1 


3 












Due to other metabolic diseases, etc. 


1 


2 


3 












With organic changes of nervous system 


] 




1 


1 - 1 












2 




2 








1 - 


1 


Manic-depressive psychoses .... 


5 


7 


12 


- - - 




1 - 1 






Dementia praecox 


6 


5 


11 




1 1 2 


2-2 


1 1 


2 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 




2 


2 












With mental deficiency 


2 


1 


3 












Without psychoses 


1 




1 








1 - 


1 


Total 


39 


34 


73 


1 - 1 


1 1 2 


3-3 


3 1 


4 



Table 7. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Continued 





30-34 


35 


-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


Psychoses 


years 


years 


years 


years 


years 




years 




M. F. T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. F. 


T. 


M. F. T. 


With syphilitic meningo encephalitis . 


1 - 1 


1 




1 


















1 1 


With other forms of syphilis 




1 




1 




















Alcoholic psychoses 


1 - 1 








2 - 


2 


2 




2 


I - 


1 






With cerebral arteriosclerosis 
















1 


1 






1 


1 2 


With other disturbances of circulation 
















1 


1 






1 


- 1 


Senile psychoses 




























Involutional psychoses .... 




















1 1 


2 


1 


- 1 


Due to other metabolic diseases, etc. . 










1 - 


1 








- 2 


2 






With organic changes of nervous system 




























Psychoneuroses 




1 




1 




















Manic-depressive psychoses . 






2 


2 


- 1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


- 1 


1 


1 


- I 






1 


2 


3 


1 - 


1 




1 


1 










Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




















- 1 


1 






With mental deficiency .... 










- 1 


1 








1 - 








Without psychoses 




























Total 


2-2 


4 


4 


8 


4 2 


6 


4 


5 


9 


3 5 8 


4 


2 6 



Table 7. Age of First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 
Psychoses — Concluded 



Psychoses 



60-64 
years 



M. F .T 



65-69 
years 



M. F. T. 



70-74 
years 



M. F. T. 



75-79 
years 



M. F. T. 



80-84 
years 



M. F. T. 



With syphilitic meningo-encephalitis 
With other forms of syphilis 

Alcoholic psychoses 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 

With other disturbances of circulation . 

Senile psychoses 

Involutional psychoses .... 
Due to other metabolic diseases, etc. 
With organic changes of nervous system 

Psychoneuroses 

Manic-depressive psychoses 

Dementia praecox 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 
With mental deficiency .... 
Without psychoses 

Total 



1 1 



1 1 2 
- 1 1 



1 - 1 
1 4 5 



1 - 
1 1 



3 2 5 



- 1 
1 - 



1 3 4 



2 2 4 2 6 



2 1 3 3 2 5 



P.D. 70 



23 



Unknown 


H 

i 




l 1 1 1 1 1 


tN 


College 


M. F. T. 


- 1 — 

1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 ^ 1 1 1 

1 1 1 1 1 1 


•* 
CN 
«N 




H 




(N ■<*' IT) — 1 


VO 


High 
Schoo 


III 


1 1 1 — 1 — 1 1 1 
1 -< 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 


1 rM 1 1 
r-a | ^ | 


X 
00 


Common 
School 


M. F. T. 


(N 1 l/^ 00 — 00 fS 1 
1 1 1 li^ ^ ^ _^ 1 
fvg 1 i/~ 1 — 1 1 


; ir; 1 1 
1 1 — 1 
1 M-* 1 1 1 


21 20 41 


ads and 
Vrites 


H 




1 1 — 1 1 1 




Re; 




1 ! — 1 1 I 1 — — 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 








1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






liter* 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


! 1 1 1 1 1 


1 




i 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 -H 1 1^1 


ts 




H 








Total 


fa 


— 1 1 00 — — (M 1 


1 lO cq ^ 1 


■* 




:^ 




lA, O 1 


o 
ID 



CJ CO 

6 a 



o 
o c 



i-i a "> u '■X 

SOT 53 ^ I- 

a o u 3 

CO 0*0 CI O 



co^ 
OX! 



125 

Q C 



-a (T > o S aj O 
w i)'ot ^-TJJS 



4J 

OT .2 o 
o 
o aj 

C > 3 



c ■ • 

trs 



■5 u c g rt-S^ 



P.D. 70 25 
Table 10. Economic Condition of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 

Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 



Total 



M. F. T 



Dependent 



M. F. T. 



Marginal 



M. F. T. 



Comfortable 



M. F. T. 



Unknown 



M. F. T. 



With syphilitic meningo-encephalitis 

With other forms of syphilis . 

Alcoholic psychoses 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

With other disturbances of circula- 
tion 

Senile psychoses .... 

Involutional psychoses 

Due to other metabolic diseases, etc. 

With organic changes of nervous 
system 

Psyche neuroses 

Manic-depressive psychoses . 

Dementia praecox 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 

With mental deficiency . 

Without psychoses .... 



1 1 
2 2 4 
1 1 2 



- 1 
1 1 



1 

6 8 
3 5 



1 2 

1 3 

2 2 



Total 



39 34 



73 



13 8 21 20 18 38 



7 12 112 



Table 11. Use of Alcohol by First Admissions Classified with Reference to Principal 

Psychoses 



Psychoses 



With syphilitic meningo-encephalitis 

With other forms of syphilis . 

Alcoholic psychoses .... 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis 

With other disturbances of circula- 
tion 

Senile psychoses .... 

Involutional psychoses 

Due to other metabolic diseases, etc, 

With organic changes of nervous 
system 

Psychoneuroses 

Manic-depressive psychoses . 

Dementia praecox .... 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 

With mental deficiency . 

Without psychoses .... 

Total 



Total 



M. F. T 



39 



Abstinent 



M. F. T. 



8 10 



17 30 47 



Temperate 



M. F. T. 



Intemperate 



M. F. T. 



1 - 1 
2-2 
2-2 

1 - 1 



19 



19 1 



Unknown 



M. F. T. 



Table 12. Marital Condition of First Admissions Classified with Reference to 
Principal Psychoses 



Psychoses 



With syphilitic meningo-encephalitis 

Withother forms of syphilis . 

Alcoholic psychoses .... 

With cerebral arteriosclerosis . 

With other disturbances of circula- 
tion 

Senile psychoses .... 

Involutional psychoses . 

Due to other metabolic diseases, etc. 

With organic changes of nervous 
system 

Psychoneuroses 

Manic-depressive psychoses . 

Dementia praecox .... 

Paranoia and paranoid conditions . 

With mental deficiency . 

Without psychoses .... 

Total 



M. 



Total 
F. T. 



39 



Single 



M. F. T. 



- 1 
1 
1 

1 

1 2 
1 2 



34 73 19 6 25 14 21 35 



Married 



Widowed 



M. F. T. 



7 12 



26 



P.D. 70 




P.D. 70 



27 



«N I 



I OJ tN 



sc O 
in vo 



1 I ^■^ 



eo 

111 



.. 2 o o 

g uj c c >, I 



ill 



^1 



o o 



C 3 

re (13, 



2 2^=0 S 

- to m C3 

^ to.t: .ti .ii .t; 



111 



.3 

1 G 



CO 



>> o 



-u ^ C.^ CO 

to oj , , o3 _ " 



28 



P.D. 









X f*; X 1 1 — »- 


1 »/: X 






1 <^ 


1 1 




ON Visit, 








1 tN-<l- 

1 r}- 




1 — 1 

. , , 


1 m <^ 
1 1 «N 


1 1 


s 




_^ O 




<M ^ T i — ^ _ 














o 

ir. 




1 1 ^. 




1 1 1 


1 — 


1 1 1 




IK NT: 








1 1 <N 






— 1 1 


1 1 : 


C 


< 




)^ 








, ,, 




1 1 1 




I'OI'ULATION 


i-2 

to s 




'S-C-XC — — 
(N X c c- — 

— 

t-^ s — ' 
— — 1^ 


cv) X 

U". 

1 't C^ 

ts X c> 




1 1 - 


— >A 


1 CI 


■* 


H 

Z 








1 X 






-< I/-, -* 






a 
c 

X 


O 

•a 

< 




— Tj- I/: — 1 — 
1 1 


1 \r. 




, 


1 <N 1 
— 


1 <^ 1 


2 


■£ 


■ c 




1 !S rvl 1 1 1 1 






1 1 1 






!N 


>I':a Ti 


s 




r^T}- 1 !M 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 




1 1 1 


1 1 - 


1 1 1 






u. tn 

'S 




, ^ ^ — , . — 


1 1 I 




! 1 1 
1 1 1 


1 — 


1 — 1 


X 
















1 — 1 


1 — 1 




iiAi.!(;i':s 1 


ti tn 

E 




1 1 1 1 1 

1 1 -r^ 1 1 i 1 

. 111 


\ 


[ 


1 1 1 
, ,^ 


1 1 1 


1 1 


<N 




CO 

o 






1 « — 




1 i 


1 — ^ 


1 LT.r^ 


O 


< 






— ^ r<4 1 1 


1 — 




, ,, 


1 1 — 


1 fN t«5 


X 

<N 






s 


1 — — 1 1 P-! ^ 


1 1 1 




1 1 — 


1 — — 


1 r; Tj- 


lO 


HONS 1 






1 1 1 , 1 
1 — — — 1 1 1 1 


1 1 
I 1 1 




1 1 1 
1 i 1 


- 1 1 
1 I t 


i 1 
! — 1 




SI 
s 














1 - 1 




J. 

■X. 






.'—:!,.: 


' 1 ^ 




1 1 I 


- 1 1 








tn 




u~, •'t 1 ;n I <n I 


1 




1 1 


1 1 


1 Cro 


o 




c 
o 




















zt 




— {^1 1 — I 1 






1 1 I 




1 (N 






fcE 




















T3 




— !N 1 — 1 1 1 








1 1 


i 00 1 





1 = 

= E £ 

C3 O) O 



o o 
c c 



••J c 



ITS -C C 



^ O C tn p 



■5 ■ c 



c A = S 

C3 S O ^ 

>> c 2 '-S It 



C.tJ a; 



P.D. 70 



29 



Table 14. Discharges of Patients Classified with Reference to Principal Psychoses 

and Condition on Discharge 



Psychoses 


Total 


Improved 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


With syphilitic meningo-encephahtis ........ 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


With other infectious diseases .......... 




1 


1 




1 


1 




- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 






2 


2 




2 


2 






1 


1 




1 


1 


Due to other metabolic diseases, etc 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


^lanic-depressive psychoses .......... 


4 


12 


16 


4 


12 


16 




5 


6 


11 




6 


11 




2 


1 


.? 


2 


1 


3 


With psychopathic personality 


1 




1 


1 




I 






2 


2 




2 


2 






2 


5 








Total 


18 


30 


48 


15 


28 


43 



Table 15. Hospital Residence during This Admission of Court First Admissions 

Discharged during IQSU 



Psychoses 


Number 


Average Net 
Hospital Residence 
in Years 




M. 


F. 


T. 


M 




F. 


T. 








1 






1.50 


1.50 


Alcoholic psychoses 


1 




1 


1 


50 




1.50 


With other disturbances of circulation 




1 


1 






1.50 


1.50 








2 






.46 


.46 


Involutional psvchoses . 


1 




T 




20 




.20 






1 


1 






.62 


.62 






1 


1 






.20 


.20 






1 


1 






.62 


.62 




3 


? 


6 


1 


33 


.72 


1.03 




3 


3 


6 


2 


78 


.71 


1.74 




2 


1 


3 




21 


.20 


.20 




1 




1 




87 




.87 


With mental deficiency 




2 


2 






3.89 


3.89 


Without psychoses 


2 


1 


3 




25 


.12 


.20 


Total 


13 


17 


30 


1. 


22 


1.04 


1.12 



30 



P.D. 



u2§ 



-"2 o's 



p t; 



0-^ 



a a; S 
S o cjO 

1 i « 



16 ~' 



<u » S 1- 
C w 5 nj 

*3 <L' ^ CO O 



"J "i' CO r N o s 



o 

J2 



<U 05.3 



a 2 ca 



^ a: »i 2 ^ « c s 

'^''^ m c So; Si I' ^ o S 
.g.S o V; e S S-S §^.2 



S 2 S § " V c 

§^ o>2 o>S 
•riios'tji-itwr 

t:5 § o-sa §.2 



(4_ ta ^ 

CO ft s'D 

C ? ^ 
[jp^ k'Z o< 

(5 >^ 



P.D. 70 



33 





H 






3-4 
year: 


:^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 - 1 1 I 








1— 1 1 lesl'^l 1— f^l 1 1 




1-2 
years 




l->lll«N|f^lll!lll 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 — M 1 1 ! 


Tf 


8-12 
Months 




1 1 — 1 I 1 1 fT) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■<1« 

tN 






1 1 - 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


«N 


1 

4-7 
lonths . 


H 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


>* 


c 




1 1 1 1 1 — 1 <>» 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1-3 
lonths 




lllll<N|i*5|-<||lll 
1 1 1 1 1 1 -I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






i 


lllll-lesl^lllll 


•>* 


ss than 
month 




lllll ^111 

1 1 1 1 1 1 (S 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 






1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 








^ ^ ^ ^ u, — 00 — -H — ao — — — 


vO 






I—I 1— 010— 1 It-.— ! 1 




O 

H 






rM 


P 1 




U1 



II 



CJ 03 



1 5 



I '=p4)92i;=''»>«2 

•- u y u c.^ ^« U 2 ^ o — -! SS 



2fc 


H 




1 X 1 1 1 




rt > 






1 1 1 1 






:^ 


1 1 1 1 rv) 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 








1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


CM 


^ 0} 










T rt 
















1 — 1 1 1 


^ 




H 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 1 


— — 


•* 


13-14 
years 




1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 


11-11 


(N 






I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 — 1 1 1 


«N 






1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


•i- 


T 








1 


— a; 

— >> 
















1 1 1 


•<* 






lllll 




9-10; 

years 


'a, 


, , , , , 


1 , , , , 


















1 fN 1 1 1 










1 ps| 1 1 1 






^ ! 


1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 










1 1 1 1 ^ fvj 1 \ \ 


1 tN 1 1 1 




S-6 
years 












i 




1 1 1 1 





c. 

c— ■ 



O 0; 

ii 

•r- CO 

C oj C -S S t3 

" e u u " ^ 
c o 



to O O o 
J3 J3 J2 J= 



V CO 

^ O 



U3 O 



c 

o 

2 >. 
<u o 
c. c 



o u o 3 o A c a 5 3 
u .t! .ti c > 5 rt S .t; .ti .ti 



o ^ <" 
, W «i >. 



34 



P.D. 70 



Table 19. Average Length of Hospital Residence during the Present Admission of 
All First Admission Cases in Residence on September 30, 193 U 



Psychoses 




Number 


Average Net 
Hospital Residence 


















M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 




5 


2 


7 


3 


08 


3 


98 


3.33 


With other forms of svphilis 


1 


— 


1 




45 




- 


.45 


With epidemic encephalitis 


3 


1 


4 


5 


50 


3 


50 


5.00 


With other infectious diseases 


1 


- 


1 


17 


50 




- 


17.50 


Alcoholic psvchoses 


11 


- 


11 


3 


49 






3.49 




1 


1 


2 


1 ^ 


50 


2 


50 


7.50 




6 


9 


15 


2 


99 


2 


26 


2.55 


With other disturbances of circulation 




1 


1 






1 


50 


1.50 


With convulsive disorders (epilepsy) ..... 


1 




1 


7 


50 










11 


8 


19 


5 


58 


3 


87 


4.86 


Involutional psvchoses 


3 


6 


9 


1 


48 


5 


49 


4.16 


Due to other metabolic diseases, etc 




2 


2 






3 


00 


3.00 


With organic changes of nervous system .... 


2 


2 


4 


13 


98 


1 


50 


7.74 


Psvchoneuroses 


3 


2 


5 




45 


7 


50 


3.27 


Manic-depressive psychoses 


11 


19 


30 


3 


66 


3 


33 


3.45 


Dementia praecox 


40 


34 


74 


5 


94 


6 


32 


6.12 


Paranoia and paranoid conditions 




1 


1 








45 


.45 




3 


3 


6 


6 


17 


9 


17 


7.67 




12 


9 


21 


3 


83 


3 


50 


3.69 


Without psvchoses 


10 


3 


13 


6 


49 


5 


50 


6.26 


Total "... 


124 


103 


227 


5 


07 


4 


64 


4.87 



Table 19a. Average Length of Hospital Residence during the Present Admission of 
All Readmission Cases in Residence on September 30, 193 1,. 



Psychoses 


Number 


Average Net 
Hospital Residence 
in Years 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


With syphilitic meningo-enrephalitis 


7 


4 


11 


3 


79 


11 


25 


6 


50 


With other forms of sj'pjilis 


2 


2 


4 




98 


3 


98 


2 


48 


With epidemic encephalitis 


4 




4 


15 


GO 






15 


00 


With other infectious diseases 


1 




1 


22 


50 






22 


50 


Alcoholic psvchoses 


63 


6 


69 


12 


26 


10 


83 


12 


13 




1 


1 


2 


22 


50 


22 


50 


22 


50 


Traumatic psvchoses 


3 


1 


4 


9 


50 


22 


50 


12 


75 


With cerebral arteriosclerosis 


2 


3 


5 


6 


00 


4 


47 


5 


08 


With other disturbances of circulation 




2 


2 






11 


48 


11 


48 


Senile psychoses 


3 


2 


5 


12 


17 


22 


50 


18 


30 


Involutional psychoses 


6 


6 


12 


3 


83 


11 


50 


7 


75 




1 


1 


2 


3 


50 




45 


1 


98 


With organic changes of nervous system .... 


2 


3 


5 


4 


50 


2 


83 


3 


50 


Psychoneuroses 


1 


3 


4 


7 


50 


5 


83 


6 


25 


Manic-depressive psychoses 


19 


35 


54 


12 


76 


8 


92 


10 


27 


Dementia praecox 


448 


324 


772 


15 


31 


11 


53 


13 


73 




5 


2 


7 


18 


70 


1 


98 


13 


92 


With psychopathic personality 




4 


11 


7 


07 


5 


00 


6 


32 


With mental deficiency 


59 


33 


92 


10 


82 


8 


56 


10 


01 


Without psychoses 


19 


12 


31 


15 


34 


11 


66 


13 


92 


Total 


653 


444 1 


.097 


14.09 


10.90 


12 


81 



Table 20. Family Care Statistics for Year Ended September 30, 193 If 

Males Females Total 

Remaining in Family Care September 30, 1933 4 79 83 

On Visit from Family Care September 30, 1933 - 2 2 

Admitted to Family Care during the Year 5 78 83 

Whole Number of Cases within the Year 9 159 168 

Discharged from Family Care within the Year: 

From Family Care to Visit Status 1 3 4 

Returned to Institution 8 57 65 

Returned to Institution irom \'isit - 1 1 

Remaining in Family Care September 30. 1934 - 98 98 

On Visit from Family Care September 30. 1934 - 2 2 

Average Daily Number in Family Care during Year: 

Supported by State . . 2.790 88.112 90.902 

Private . O 026 . 766 . 793